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Texas!!!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are so many old time skills and so much knowledge that has been lost. Does anyone have something they can share?

For example, an old time de-wormer was tobacco leaves. Another example is making tea from pine needles for Vitamin C. Or, something I use a lot--beet pulp! Beet pulp is extremely cheap horse/livestock feed. In the old days they used beet pulp or mangles for feed. Mangles are easy to grow. People did not have bagged horse feed like they do now.
 

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Seeking The Truth
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There are so many old time skills and so much knowledge that has been lost. Does anyone have something they can share?

For example, an old time de-wormer was tobacco leaves. Another example is making tea from pine needles for Vitamin C. Or, something I use a lot--beet pulp! Beet pulp is extremely cheap horse/livestock feed. In the old days they used beet pulp or mangles for feed. Mangles are easy to grow. People did not have bagged horse feed like they do now.
Good subject.
I'll have to think about it,but I do know of one treatment for puncture wounds,my aunt used it on my 3 year old when she gashed open her foot on bike spokes, you could see the bone," turpentine". I was very mad that she used it at first but it healed right up.
 

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Well ... Some one forgot to send my critters the memo about mangles & beets ... :gaah: they would not touch them not even after a few days. So I gave up on that ...

As for using tobacco leaves as a de-wormer, my cousin used chew tobacco (so ... same but a little different) The horses would nudge his shirt till he would give them a little of the chew. Now a day someone would say he got the horses hooked on tobacco.

But I will agree a lot of old time skills lost ...
 

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The Future?
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My dad use to make a flute out of willow bark..need to google..
 

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I have never heard of mangles
mangel - (Somethimes called wurzel ) -- A variety of the common beet having a large yellowish root, used chiefly as cattle feed ...
 

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Texas!!!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well ... Some one forgot to send my critters the memo about mangles & beets ... :gaah: they would not touch them not even after a few days. So I gave up on that ...
You have to use reverse-psychology! LOL Act like it is something they aren't allowed to have. I do that for all my critters. When I put dog wormer on their food, they would turn their noses up. When I put it on the counter and acted like they weren't supposed to have it, they wanted it.
 

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I keep that in mind ... lol ... but I still don't think the horses or the goats would fall for it, maybe the cows but I'm not real sure about that. :D

But a great thread ... :2thumb:
 

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Reverend Coot
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Use honey on a wound.

Sharpen a knife on a china bowl.

Make lye water fer soap usin ash from the wood stove.

Use grape leaves sorta like a taco shell fer meats.

Dip match heads in wax ta make em water proof.
 

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I have to grate my sugar beets for the chickens to eat them-same with the mangels-my uncle would shred them and add them to the horse feed in the winter.. they loved them.
 

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The wanderer
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Use honey on a wound.

Make lye water fer soap usin ash from the wood stove.

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I used honey on a place on my finger earlier this summer where I gouged the back of a knuckle. It got blisters around it and took weeks to heal. Normally I heal quickly. It was organic, raw honey, ordered by the gallon locally.

For making lye, make sure you're using ashes from hardwood. Pine and other soft wood ash has a different composition. Here, out west, we burn primarily pine because that and Aspen (another soft wood) are about all there is.
 

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Hmmm.....I have to think..seems I know some things my mother and father passed on, but the mind is a blank tonight.

I can DO a lot of old fashioned things.

One thing I do remember was putting a piece of potato on an infected wound (smaller one). Baking soda made into a paste on a bee sting. I know out here, pine, or fir needles mashed up and put onto a fresh cut will help keep it clean and free from infection. In Oregon, at least, we have "licorice ferns". They grow up in trees usually out of areas that branch out heavily. Take these and clean off the outer rind with a knife, and you can chew on them for stomach upset, or steeped into a tea. They do taste like black licorice too.

Gypsysue, bet you knew this one. Bilberry...otherwise known as blue huckleberries. Good for eyesight, and it is an anti-inflammatory. This would mean good for PMS, joint pain, etc...pretty much anything you would take ibuprofen for (plus you would only get a stomach ache if you ate too much).

Blackberry leaves...
For example, two thousand years ago, the roman army doctor Galenos had his soldiers chew blackberry leaves to strengthen gums and build up physical resistance; today, we know it was the vitamin C and tannins in the leaves that he was counting on to boost immunity and heal wounds. Blackberry leaves have high levels of tannins and vitamin C, and they are made into a tea that has proved beneficial as a remedy for diarrhea, a gargle for throat inflammations and a compress for wounds and rashes. The tea also helps regulate both heavy and light menstrual flow and is a gastrointestinal soother. It's a tea you can drink daily-it has no side effects. Sweeten its bitter taste with honey, or mix the leaves with other herbs for healing tea blends.
(a quote from herbal remedy site, I just needed backup for my memory, plus they put it into words better than me)

Oooh! mustard powder....isn't that good to put on a hot wet towel and wrapped around the chest for heavy congestion?

I do know fresh mint is good for digestion when it is made into a tea, as well as for asthma, I know this being asthmatic myself, peppermint gum, mints and tea are a staple for me. Dandelion root is good for liver cleansing. The root is cleaned, roasted and steeped in hot water, taken three times a day, will clean your system of impurities...and who does not have dandelions around? Besides I found out that it tastes a bit like cheap coffee, not an awful taste, very tolerable.

Got a plugged up ear (full of stubborn ear wax)? Tilt head to the side and drop in about three drops of peroxide, let fizzle a bit, then tilt over, drain and clear out gently with some water, q-tip if needed. This softens up the worst ear wax, but it does freak out younger kids (well it did mine). Earaches were dealt with by my mother with "sweet oil", just warmed up olive oil dropped into the ear, then put a cotton swab in for a while.

So, maybe I did remember some things....I'll be back with more.
 

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willow bark tea for headaches =aspirin
bread mold on a cut then place clean cobwebs on top and wrap with a boiled white rag = penicillin, cobwebs contain a substance that helps clotting, a boiled white rag was clean.
an egg in lye water to judge its strength= if it stands its good if it floats it is too strong.
used tea leaves on a bad burn = tannic acid will help in healing and scaring. i have used this one myself many times. use the water of tea leaves from second soaking for sunburn.
lambs ear on cuts to help remove infection = the hairs on the lambs ear collect and "hold" the pus.
 

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Head cheese

Head cheese - souse meat

Now that is a skill lost around here, I remember my Aunt making it ... but even I didn't make it the last time we killed a hog. :eek:
 

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Use honey on a wound.

Sharpen a knife on a china bowl.

Make lye water fer soap usin ash from the wood stove.

Use grape leaves sorta like a taco shell fer meats.

Dip match heads in wax ta make em water proof.
Then china bowl trick works for sharpening Norelco rotary razor blades. Remove the safety screens and run the razor over a china plate for a flat surface.

Stuffed grape leaves...yummy...a famous Middle Eastern dish. Ladle fresh, plain yogurt over the leaves over them (according to a Syrian friend who used to make them them for me). :2thumb:

I used the waxed match trick when in the Boy Scouts with Ohio Blue Tip strike anywhere matches. Can't find them anymore. :dunno:
 

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Then china bowl trick works for sharpening Norelco rotary razor blades. Remove the safety screens and run the razor over a china plate for a flat surface.

Stuffed grape leaves...yummy...a famous Middle Eastern dish. Ladle fresh, plain yogurt over the leaves over them (according to a Syrian friend who used to make them them for me). :2thumb:

I used the waxed match trick when in the Boy Scouts with Ohio Blue Tip strike anywhere matches. Can't find them anymore. :dunno:
Look in any Ace hardware stores-I have been getting the "Blue diamond strike anywhere" matches for .89¢ a box. They also have real "lye" for my soap making. Got a couple boxes put by.
 
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