Keeping beans in original packaging when LT storage?

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by goose, Jun 12, 2010.

  1. goose

    goose Active Member

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    I'm relatively new to prepping, and have lurked here for a while. I've started accumulating foodstuffs, and right now I'm packaging beans for LT storage.

    I've bought them from Aldi; they come in 2-pound bags. I'd really like to store them in those bags, inside Mylar w/ oxygen absorbers. Keeping the original packaging has advantages (for barter, keeping info on the beans right with the beans, etc.).

    I tried an experiment: I poked about 60 holes in those bags with an awl, large enough to expect air to circulate, small enough for the beans to stay in the bag.

    I then put two of those bags, along w/ an oxygen absorber, into a gallon mylar bag, squeezed out the air as best I could, then sealed them. The Oxy absorber worked; the mylar bag pulled in tight, so enough air is circulating for the oxy absorber to pull out the oxygen--though it took a couple days for this to happen.

    Question: Is there any long-term problem (i.e., 20 years plus) w/ storing the beans in the original packaging?

    I've looked online to try to learn about the plastic packaging and have so far struck out. I can't tell what type of plastic it is (no recycling symbol on the bag).


    And, yes, they won't store space-efficiently as well as loose beans in a 5- or 6-gallon bucket, but I'm willing to accept that penalty in exchange for smaller mylar packages.
     
  2. allen_idaho

    allen_idaho Well-Known Member

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    There is no real problem with keeping the beans in the original packages. Although the whole point is to keep the package airtight to keep moisture out. I don't know if poking a bunch of holes into it is a good idea.

    Most prefer to keep them in large glass or plastic tubs mainly to keep bugs from chewing their way in. It also provides plenty of moisture protection to store the beans indefinately.
     

  3. goose

    goose Active Member

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    I may have been able to explain it better.

    I poked the holes in the bags so that, after I put the bags in the mylar, the oxy absorber could work. It wasn't clear that it would be able to get at the oxygen in the dead space among the beans unless I poked holes in the bags to let air circulate to the oxy absorber.

    Even then, I had my doubts as to whether the oxy absorber would work, as probably 98 percent of its surface area is pressed against the plastic bags or the mylar.

    Here's what the bags of beans look like:

    [​IMG]

    Here's what those bags look like, with holes poked in them to let the air circulate, in a sealed mylar bag w/ oxygen absorber:

    [​IMG]

    I've placed those bags in the mylar just like they look in the pic above, except I've poked about 60 holes in each bag of beans.

    As I noted in the previous post, the oxy absorber worked; it's created a partial vacuum such that the mylar has been drawn tight against the beans.

    Mostly I'm just concerned about whether I can expect the plastic bags the beans come in will be stable over 20 or 30 years of storage.
     
  4. goose

    goose Active Member

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    0
    I may have been able to explain it better.

    I poked the holes in the bags so that, after I put the bags in the mylar, the oxy absorber could work. It wasn't clear that it would be able to get at the oxygen in the dead space among the beans unless I poked holes in the bags to let air circulate to the oxy absorber.

    Even then, I had my doubts as to whether the oxy absorber would work, as probably 98 percent of its surface area is pressed against the plastic bags or the mylar.

    Here's what the bags of beans look like:

    [​IMG]

    Here's what those bags look like, with holes poked in them to let the air circulate, in a sealed mylar bag w/ oxygen absorber:

    [​IMG]

    I've placed those bags in the mylar just like they look in the pic above, except I've poked about 60 holes in each bag of beans.

    As I noted in the previous post, the oxy absorber worked; it's created a partial vacuum such that the mylar has been drawn tight against the beans.

    Mostly I'm just concerned about whether I can expect the plastic bags the beans come in will be stable over 20 or 30 years of storage. They'll be stored in 5-gallon food-grade buckets.
     
  5. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    I wouldn't think it would hurt to leave them in the bags, even with poking the holes in them, since you're repacking the whole thing in mylar. Beans are one of those almost-eternal storage items. Keep them dry and they'll keep pretty much forever.

    Some of our beans are in 5-gallon buckets, some are in glass gallon jars. Some are in their original bags and stored in rubbermaid totes or 5-gallon buckets, several bags and varieties to a container. Some we've used had been stored more than 15 years and were fine.

    I'm no expert, though.
     
  6. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    That makes perfect sense. The O2 would be pulled from the plastic as well as the mylar. :2thumb:
     
  7. JohnFord

    JohnFord New Member

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    Cat Litter Jugs

    I buy cat litter in those big, white, plastic jugs. After I use the litter, I rinse the jugs out with dish soap and a little bleach. Usually takes about three rinses to get ALL of the perfume smell out of the jugs.

    Once the jugs are thoroughly cleaned, I fill them with dried beans. Each jug holds about 20 lbs. of beans. Then I set them in the freezer and leave them there for a week or so. Then I take the jugs out of the freezer, screw the caps on them tight, and set them in the garden shed.

    I've got beans out there that are three, four, five years old. They cook and eat just fine, though I have to cook them a little longer than fresh beans because they are more thoroughly dried. But they taste great cooked in chicken broth and smoked ham.
     
  8. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    I know for a fact that people broke open kids toy bean bags in the 30s-40s and soaked the beans or peas in water for a few days and ate them.


    personally, i store them in 5 gal pails,mylar and o2 absorbers. if kept in the original package, there may be weevil or some other insect eggs in there to ruin your beans while you are thinking they are safe.It's best to get the o2 away from them to kill any bugs or eggs.