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Have people recently changed their opinion about preps?

  • They think I'm more crazy than ever for prepping.

    Votes: 3 10.7%
  • No noticeable change in opinion.

    Votes: 10 35.7%
  • They're curious about preps instead of uninterested.

    Votes: 10 35.7%
  • A big swing in opinion towards preps being a good thing.

    Votes: 4 14.3%
  • They now want me to help them prep.

    Votes: 1 3.6%
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Some of us have been getting prepared for a very long time. Other people like me are new to survival preparations. However, I'm sure we've all been called "nuts" or gotten weird looks when talking about our preparations.

I've noticed a lot of changes around me lately. Traffic is lighter than ever and I can drive places much faster. The price of food and everything else is going up. Most of the women I know still have their jobs and almost all of the men have lost theirs. The people I know who invest have abandoned stocks and bonds and are going for commodities only. So in other words a lot of things have changed. The most important change is...

People don't think I'm nuts anymore. Okay, a few people will never change their minds but some others are reversing themselves. I told a good friend about my preps and he thought I was a bit crazy. He went home and told his wife and she told him that her friends are all talking about doing exactly what I'm doing. He asked me to forward him some links. Another friend has expressed interest in getting his gun permit. The investors I know have finally clued in and started taking my investment advice.

So do people think you're less crazy today than they did last year? Has opinion changed in your area in regards to being prepared? Let us know.
 

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Greenhorn
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Nope... I am still crazy as ever. But when the SHTF my buddies knows they can count on me to still help them.... :beercheer:

Even my family think I am slightly crazy.... but I only let them think the slightly part instead of having them think I am way out there looney toons :nuts: :D

And the traffic around here is WORSE THAN EVER! There is even quite a bit of construction going on even tho more building are becoming vacant every month...
 

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One of my three sisters is finally starting to wonder if what we're doing here might have some merit. Last week she asked me how much stuff I canned and how I did it. She is thinking that next year she might like to have a garden and try canning. :) My family are the only people I really nag about prepping. If it comes up in conversation with others and I get "that look", I drop it.
 

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I am a little teapot
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I don't really talk about it much, and we are still new. We still have a lot to get into place but we are doing what we can as the almighty dollar will allow. I have noticed, however, that prepping is showing up in mainstream media, with commercials for agencies like ready.gov showing up on the radio and less talk about "survivalists" while there is more about the less questionable "preppers". It's like the mentality is shifting from people like us being less like Ruby Ridge to more like the family in the 50's with a bomb shelter in the basement.
 

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Some of us have been getting prepared for a very long time. Other people like me are new to survival preparations. However, I'm sure we've all been called "nuts" or gotten weird looks when talking about our preparations.

I've noticed a lot of changes around me lately. Traffic is lighter than ever and I can drive places much faster. The price of food and everything else is going up. Most of the women I know still have their jobs and almost all of the men have lost theirs. The people I know who invest have abandoned stocks and bonds and are going for commodities only. So in other words a lot of things have changed. The most important change is...

People don't think I'm nuts anymore. Okay, a few people will never change their minds but some others are reversing themselves. I told a good friend about my preps and he thought I was a bit crazy. He went home and told his wife and she told him that her friends are all talking about doing exactly what I'm doing. He asked me to forward him some links. Another friend has expressed interest in getting his gun permit. The investors I know have finally clued in and started taking my investment advice.

So do people think you're less crazy today than they did last year? Has opinion changed in your area in regards to being prepared? Let us know.
I don't advertise the fact that I'm prepared, some have figured it out where I use to work in what I purchased. They always said we are going to Bobs' place if something ever happens. My neighbors said if the power goes out they will string extension cords over to my system for power, the same ones that drank beer on the other side of the fence and watched my family and I raise the wind turbine up:scratch. The people my wife works with jokingly make comments that we are off the grid, and must be survivalists, go figure.:nuts:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It looks like opinions are shifting a bit. I think it'll take a while before being prepared becomes mainstream or fashionable. I hope we're all done with our preps before the mainstream catches on and starts driving the prices of survival items up. In the meantime I'm happy that more people are starting to wake up.
 

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Unfortunately the vast majority still think the government has things well in hand. :nuts:
 

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Since I live on a farm I notice this change too, more than ever people are taking an interest in rural living and asking me questions like how many eggs do chickens regularly lay, and other such similar questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think it's a growing trend. I hope it catches on. It really is just a return to good old fashioned values. Self reliance and responsibility.
 

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Unfortunately the vast majority still think the government has things well in hand. :nuts:
So this morning on the national news, they have commented on the way our government has handled the swine-flu issue. Originally they said that there would be 250 mil doses available for the flu season, about two months into it now, then scaled back to 50 mil doses available, then 40, 30, 20, now maybe 10 mil, each week it is downsized. There won't be enough for the target "at risk" population now. Great news for those that think the government should run the health care system.

I'm sure that the government has prepayed for the 250 doses and by the time it is available the flu season will be over, surplus flu vaccine anyone, who ends up paying for that.:rantoff:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My friends lined up and waited six hours for the shots. Part way through someone announced that only "high risk" people would be getting the shot. A man who had been waiting for six hours as well went nuts. They gave him the shot anyway just to keep the peace. Supplies are running low because there has been a mad panic by people to get the shot.
 

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Since I live on a farm I notice this change too, more than ever people are taking an interest in rural living and asking me questions like how many eggs do chickens regularly lay, and other such similar questions.
Here in Calgary (a city of just over 1 million people) there is a movement in the works to allow city-dwellers to raise chickens in their backyards (for meat or eggs). It is getting front-page newspaper coverage as this group tries to challenge the city's bylaws ...

Here is a copy of the news in the local "FastForward" ..

FFWD - Calgary Life & Style - Food - Chicks in the city

ffwWeekly said:
As Calgarians become more aware of the source of their food and the distance it must travel to arrive on their plates, and begin to understand the impact that travel time has on our dwindling natural resources (it has been calculated that if every U.S. citizen ate just one meal a week composed of locally and organically raised meats and produce, they would reduce their country's oil consumption by over 1.1 million barrels of oil per week), urban gardening has become the new Good Thing. (If the 100-mile diet is good, the 100-foot diet is better, right?) As it turns out, there are plenty of vegetables that grow very well in Calgary, even if the only dirt available is in planters on the patio.

Any step we can take toward sustainability, particularly during this time of worldwide food crisis and rising oil and food costs, is a good idea. A few forward-thinking Calgarians are making the argument that chickens - hens, that is, not roosters - should be allowed to be kept as pets in order to further enable their owners to become more self-sufficient. At farmers' markets around town, free-range eggs are always among the first to sell out. Two to three hens could keep an average-sized family in fresh, organic, free-run eggs year-round while helping dispose of waste and contributing natural weed and pest control - there is no better way to keep slugs and insects out of backyards and gardens. However, according to a Calgary bylaw, chickens are not allowed within city limits, as they are considered livestock:

Responsible Pet Ownership Bylaw #23M2006

LIVESTOCK

27. No person shall keep Livestock in any area of the City except where the keeping of Livestock is allowed under The City of Calgary Land Use Bylaw

(n) "Livestock" means:

(v) Animals of the avian species including chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, or pheasants, and

(vi) all other Animals that are kept for agricultural purposes, but does not include cats, dogs, or other domesticated household pets


The idea of keeping chickens in the backyard is not totally out there - hens are legal in Victoria, B.C., as well as in many U.S. cities including Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Chicago and New York. In Victoria they may be kept as pets as well as for egg production, although the eggs may not be sold. The Niagara Falls bylaw is more specific: a maximum of 10 chickens (coops must be in the backyard), 7.6 metres from the rear property line and 4.6 metres from the side-lot line. Coops must allow for proper ventilation and for movement of chickens in keeping with good animal husbandry practices. Roosters are not allowed in either city.

A simple change in the wording of the bylaw from "chickens" to "roosters" would allow quiet, egg-producing hens while keeping roosters from waking us up too early in the morning. There is a misconception that chickens are noisy, when in fact it's roosters that can be noisy - hens are quiet (unlike many dogs).

Disease is a common concern when the subject of urban chickens arises - primarily avian flu. Supporters of the urban chicken concept maintain that this is not a significant risk when dealing with a few chickens in a backyard, as opposed to a full-fledged chicken farm - certainly it has not been an issue for other large cities that allow domestic hens. All animals carry with them an inherent risk of disease, whether it's rabies, ringworm or avian flu. As always, any pet-owning family is expected to take responsibility for the health of their animals.

Calgary teachers are allowed to keep chicks in their classrooms as pets, but must return them when they reach adolescence and begin to turn from chicks into chickens; from domesticated animals to livestock. The potential for learning is clear. Beyond that, it seems the environmental, financial and health benefits should outweigh any potential risks to the community. Chicken coops are smaller than many dog runs, and feed consists of vegetarian scraps and seed - similar to what you'd find in most bird feeders, it isn't anything new that might attract pests.

It's an interesting concept - surely a minor change to the bylaw would come at no financial cost to the city, and could be a great stride toward a strong and sustainable local food community.

For more information, visit www.calgarychickens.blogspot.com.

Julie Van Rosendaal is a food journalist and cookbook author, food and nutrition columnist for the Calgary Eyeopener on CBC Radio and co-host (with Ned Bell) of It's Just Food on Access and Canadian Learning Television.
 

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Another copy / paste of a local-newspaper:

Chicken owners fight bylaw

CalgaryHerald said:
A mother of three is taking the City of Calgary to court over the right to raise chickens.

Mary March, who has three hens in the backyard of her home in the northwest community of Highwood, pleaded not guilty at provincial traffic court on Tuesday to a bylaw ticket she received for possessing livestock in a prohibited area.

"I got the chickens so I have food," March, holding her one-year-old daughter Safree, said outside court after setting an April 1 trial date.

"I have three kids and it's hard to feed three kids, everybody knows that.

"We all have the right to a few chickens. There's way worse animals people have as far as I'm concerned--boa constrictors and dangerous pets like that that don't produce food."

March, who bought her chickens six months ago, is one of about 35 Calgary families that raise hens for eggs.

She was visited by a bylaw officer after she believes a neighbour complained, then was given 30 days to get rid of her hens.

When she didn't do so, she was given a ticket.

Bill Bruce, director of animal and bylaw services for the City of Calgary, said the bylaw prohibiting livestock has been in effect since 2003.

He said March is the only person facing such a charge, because most people have complied with the bylaw and removed the chickens when requested.

"We'll see what the court does on this one, then we'll deal with it," said Bruce. "It's wise to run it through the court first.

"The court is not looking at whether (the bylaw) as a good or bad idea, just whether the city has the right to regulate this activity.

"If the court struck the bylaw, then the city has to respond."

March is a member of CLUCK --Calgary Liberated Urban Chicken Klub--which agrees there should be a restriction on the number of hens allowed, such as six, at any residence.

CLUCK founder Paul Hughes, who has five hens in the yard of his home in the southwest community of Killarney, said outside court he had no problems with his neighbours.

"Calgary heritage is agrarian, and we've completely turned our back on our agrarian heritage," said Hughes.

"It's not Cowtown, it's cowless town. In New York, you can have a cow and a chicken, based on reasonableness.

"You can keep an animal, if it's in a proper pen, you keep it clean and it doesn't fight anybody."

Bruce said most Canadian cities do not allow livestock, such as chickens, but noted Vancouver is just beginning to permit it on a restricted basis.

Hughes was given a 30-day grace period to get rid of his chickens, which ends next Monday.

But he said he, too, will fight the anticipated ticket.

"I get about a half-dozen eggs a day, which is suitable for a family," he said.

"They live in a high-end condo, a really nice shed in the backyard. They have full run of a free-range area and it's extremely well kept."

March said she doesn't believe she has done anything illegal.

She just insists she has the right to produce food.

"I wouldn't want anyone to have more than six chickens," she said.

"I mean, dogs smell if you don't clean up after them. It's just like any other animal. It's a matter of responsible ownership."

[email protected] theherald. canwest.com

© Copyright (c) The Calgary Herald
 

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Its better to be naked with your friends, than to be clothed with your enemies

Naekid, isn't it getting a little cold now for this naked thing up there...
You will always know your true friends - those who you can be around and never worry about what you look like ..

It is supposed to be 11° above freezing here today .. plenty warm enough to wander about barefoot. :beercheer:
 

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Just checked the Environment Canada webpage - it is officially 52°F (11°C) right now (Noon-Thirty) and the sun is shining in a clear-blue-sky! :2thumb:
 

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Just to sidestep back to the flu thing from a couple posts ago...as I said, I had my minor surgery last week in a small, regional hospital. As I was going through the admission procedures, the lady I was talking to asked if I had had a seasonal flu shot. Then she asked if I had had an H1N1 shot. For both I said no I hadn't and when she offered them I said no to both. She said ok, but when she left there was literature (propaganda?) left on her chair harping up the flu shots. I'm not sure if they had H1N1 vaccine or not, but I'm thinking they must have. I'm 33 and healthy-don't normally get flu shots, so I turned it down. My thought was there are lots of people in this hospital who need it more than me and I probably wouldn't get it anyway. So if I get H1N1 it's now officially my fault.
 
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