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Until 1969 we had no electrical power in our home in the country and in the city we lived in a converted basement without air-condition, just two big doors leading to the patio, the kitchen had open walls totally separated from the house and that was in the tropics the island of Cuba, hot, humid and with 10 hours of sunshine daily. Keep in mind that homes were constructed for this type of weather; my family country home had big tall windows that never close, high open attic and a totally separated kitchen, typical of old style Caribbean homes where the kitchen was always at the back of the house with open walls, people also dress for this type of weather. Since coming to America, an electric jungle, I notice that instead of using Mother Nature to our favor, we fight it; our ancestors build homes of thick adobe walls with many windows high ceilings and homes in the city had extended porches, sometimes all around the house or at least awnings to keep the sun away from coming in, we now built them like boxes with seal attics to hold the heat in and keep the electric bill high. With the technology we have now there is no reason to suffer any, solar power fans and air condition are available even refrigeration but you still be attach to some form of grid and is expensive. My honest subjection, open your house up and cook outside, install awnings, dress loosely, wear more cotton ,lose some weight and forget about EMP`s or STP`s, hell life is hard already .
 

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Keeping cool in the country is a whole lot different than keeping cool in the city.

City living is the developers seeing how many houses they can put in the smallest possible footprint so there's no chance of a breeze finding its way between the houses or you being able to plant enough trees to shade your house. Then there's all that reflective heating - concrete and asphalt. Don't forget the exhaust from the cars. It all adds to degrees on the thermometer.

It's a lot different in the country. We can sit in a lawn chair under a shade tree and enjoy a cooling breeze even on the hottest of days. We have grass instead of concrete which aids in cooling. A lot of us, on this side of Texas, have easy access to ponds, creeks, and lakes so a quick dip or a good cooling foot soaking is easy to do.

Some of you may not understand this next comment.... for us, living in the country is less stressful than city living. I think that lack of chronic stress, that lack of anxiety, is in itself calm and cooling even if only psychological.

Don't get me wrong, I would miss air conditioning; but we have a better chance of getting by without it where we live.
 

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I am from Ireland and went to Sacremento for a month in Sept 1985. I will never forget how uncomfortably cold it was with A/C everywhere. I have never experienced such cold and was unwell for about 2 years after. I would prefer the heat and humidity which I experienced in Kenya, Philippines, India and Sri Lanka.
 

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Keeping cool in the country is a whole lot different than keeping cool in the city.

City living is the developers seeing how many houses they can put in the smallest possible footprint so there's no chance of a breeze finding its way between the houses or you being able to plant enough trees to shade your house. Then there's all that reflective heating - concrete and asphalt. Don't forget the exhaust from the cars. It all adds to degrees on the thermometer.

It's a lot different in the country. We can sit in a lawn chair under a shade tree and enjoy a cooling breeze even on the hottest of days. We have grass instead of concrete which aids in cooling. A lot of us, on this side of Texas, have easy access to ponds, creeks, and lakes so a quick dip or a good cooling foot soaking is easy to do.

Some of you may not understand this next comment.... for us, living in the country is less stressful than city living. I think that lack of chronic stress, that lack of anxiety, is in itself calm and cooling even if only psychological.

Don't get me wrong, I would miss air conditioning; but we have a better chance of getting by without it where we live.
There are huge heat storage areas in cities, paved streets and parking lots, buildings that store up heat in their mass, windows that reflect heat to the sidewalks and streets, sometimes with enough energy to start a fire. Then there are the vehicles, exhaust was mentioned but the heat coming off of radiators is tremendous especially adding the AC condenser heat. Even the small town of around 1,500 population, which we live four miles from, it's amazing just how much heat is generated there, in the winter when we have snow it can be on the roads until about a 1/4 mile from town where it's melted from there through town.
 

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after a year of shtf, and nearly everyone is dead, you'll be able to run around in a diesel vehicle, getting a diesel tank trailer from a farm or a military base, along with a generator. you'll again have AC if you want it. but what makes more sense is move to the southern rockies, on the coast for winter, up near snowmass for summer.
 

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I work out side so the heat gets to me. I had heat exhaustion when I was a kid and ever since then I have issues with it. I need AC and usually stay in side some times when it gets above 90+ degrees out. Just can't take those hot and humid days.
 

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There are huge heat storage areas in cities, paved streets and parking lots, buildings that store up heat in their mass, windows that reflect heat to the sidewalks and streets, sometimes with enough energy to start a fire. Then there are the vehicles, exhaust was mentioned but the heat coming off of radiators is tremendous especially adding the AC condenser heat. Even the small town of around 1,500 population, which we live four miles from, it's amazing just how much heat is generated there, in the winter when we have snow it can be on the roads until about a 1/4 mile from town where it's melted from there through town.
There's even a name for it. It's called the Heat Island Effect.
 

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yeah, maybe, but it aint enough heat to save you if you're homeless and don't have proper gear, I can tell you that from experience. if you're saying that being out in the open is 10F cooler in hot weather, that I agree with, but if it's over 80F, at night, it's still too damned hot for decent sleeping. Which is one of the reasons that the homeless are often drunks and/or dopers. It helps them sleep in nasty conditions.
 
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