How does one not sound like a wacko?

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by Jason, Jul 29, 2009.

  1. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    I know that the short answer to this is "Who cares what people think, do what you think is right and you can sit in your warm house/shelter/whatever with a full belly while everyone else's stomach is grumbling in the rain".

    My question, however, is not without merit...or so I hope.

    So here goes. I really think that it pays to be ready for whatever comes along. We live on a farm and have some (not much) livestock and lots of crops. We are not self reliant but are trying to get that way.

    I guess I'm wondering how do you start getting ready, I mean really getting ready, for a SHTF situation without sounding like some wacko? How do you tell the wife that you want a year's worth of canned goods in the cellar just in case a comet slams into the planet or Yellowstone explodes? My wife hunts better than me and on our first date she lifted up her hoodie to show me the .45 she had on her side, just so I knew it was there. I'm not TOO worried about sounding like a loon to her, but I am a little bit.

    Complacency is rampant in today's society, I guess. We band together when we have to but everyone seems surprised when there is an emergency. I dunno...just some random thoughts from a respectful newbie. Hope I don't sound too much like a goof.
     
  2. pills

    pills Well-Known Member

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    Personally I find my wife likes the security. If it involves food she is usually on board. I sometimes lose her with guns.
     

  3. dukman

    dukman Greenhorn

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    If someone makes fun of my hobby and calls me a wacko... I tell them to look in the mirror. Most people have a hobby of their own that is pretty wacky.

    When it comes down to them needing something that you have... they tend to think you as being a little less wacky :D
     
  4. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    Those are both reassuring comments. Thanks, guys.
     
  5. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    You can talk to them about conservation. People only start to ration a resource once they know it is running out. Just about everything on our planet is running out and there are more people born every minute. There isn't any place to get more of anything. Once we run out we run out.

    People usually understand this idea.
     
  6. caleb.rumeida

    caleb.rumeida Guest

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    Our group is semi-dark. We don't talk about what we are doing until we have a good understanding that the other person understands. This circumvents a lot of the wacko talk and also keeps what we are doing out of the public eye which suits us.

    Caleb Rumeida
    Culturally Independent
     
  7. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    My mom thinks I've gone off the deep end, as well as most of my siblings. To explain the food storage, I just tell them, " Food prices are only going up so why not buy more and store it when you find a bargain". As for the chickens; "I prefer fresh eggs as opposed to store bought".
    I grew up in an area where you looked forward to hunting season with the same zeal as the last day of school. The first day of buck season was considered an excused absence if you were 12 years old or older. Even though I still hunt, I tell them that it is much easier to walk out to the pasture and take a goat than to slosh around in the woods in the rain and snow, then drag a deer back home.
    They still think I'm a bit of a loon, but it's an easier pill for them to swallow when explained this way than to tell them that I think the sky is falling.
     
  8. NCLee

    NCLee New Member

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    UncleJoe, that's exactly the approach that I use. For 2 reasons.

    For most folks, I don't want them to know that I'm working on a long term food storage plan. For those who I know will think I'm crazy, I'd rather that they head for the FEMA food lines than stop by my house, when mother nature creates havoc. It's fine to talk about it in a general manner like discussing a prepardness article that's recently appeared in the local paper. Beyond that, I keep what I'm doing to myself. After all, they've had as much "heads up" as I have.

    Second, like you said, it's easier to get family members on board by gradually introducing them to the scope of the project. For example, "I bought the Coleman camp stove so we can make pancakes on the griddle in the backyard for breakfast." After we ate breakfast out there a few times, using the stove and a few other items I'd picked up, I didn't get a raised eyebrow when I stocked up on fuel for the stove. ;)

    Although, I must admit that after going through several ice storms and hurricanes that took out the power, it's a bit easier here than it is where folks haven't had to deal with reality themselves.

    Just my 2-cents.
    Lee
     
  9. Fn/Form

    Fn/Form Function over Form

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    Jason,

    Introduce the idea to her in the exact same way you became concerned. Share the reasons for your concern. Give examples of such, like Argentina, the Gulf Coast during a storm, etc. Tell her about the benefits. Talk about how it is making you realize how dependent you are in a lot of other ways; energy, light, cleanliness, water, etc. Then the food will seem a small part. ;-) Give it time to set in. If she's as rational as you make her seem, she'll come around... if she's not already thinking it.

    For me, the reasons are economic instability, the rush on food/goods that comes when people panic, the complete unavailability of food at those times and avoiding waiting or dealing with idiots waiting for food, the possibility of friends/good family needing to stay with you in such or other hard times, how little food is actually on the shelves at the store when you need it most, and how you can help others if you want. Most families with a "farm" had a larder.
     
  10. cattlefarmer

    cattlefarmer Guest

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    Why don’t you just take a vacation with us for a week? When it’s over she will know what is wacko.
     
  11. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I am the neighborhood "Jeeper" - I am always working on projects either in the front yard or in the back yard. Most of my neighbors have come to know me as the "goto-guy" for tools or knowledge (I have also been accused of being a walking encyclopedia) ...

    I tell them that I am an avid outdoors-guy and prefer to hang out in the bush ... when asked, I tell them that I am in training. When they ask, I tell them that I am practicing living without any outside support. When they ask why, I tell them straight-up that I believe that the world is going to hell in a hand-basket and that I believe that there isn't anything that we can do about it - and - the government seems to be helping that situation instead of stopping it.
     
  12. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    What kind of responses do you get with that statement? When I put it that way, I get a blank stare and get told "oh come on, it's not going to get that bad". Most people have no idea how bad things are likely to get.
     
  13. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    The world might not be Hell... but you CAN see it from here. :eek:
     
  14. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I sometimes get the blank stare as the person attempts to comprehend my statement. I sometimes get the defensive retort. I sometimes get the "I can't see your tin-foil-hat" response.

    I just turn the conversation around a bit. I ask them what would they do in the middle of a snow-storm that knocks out the power for two weeks. They try to tell me that would never happen. It is amazing how short people's memories are. Only a couple years ago all the power was out for between 2 to 6 weeks throughout Ontario and Quebec due to a freak ice-storm. I remind them of that and then they like to respond "it wasn't as bad as the newspapers made it out to be". I introduce them to my friend Greg who was trapped at the top of his apartment building with no power, no water and hundreds of stairs between him and the ground. His story is the same as thousands of people - not being able to goto work because the gas-pumps were not filling up cars. Not being able to do the work (he is a chef) with no power in the building to accept debit-card transactions and no power for lights. He was lucky and was without power for only 2 weeks. That was 2 weeks without a pay cheque. Rent still had to be paid and when you live pay cheque to pay cheque it really puts you into a very bad position.

    He is just about out of the trouble he got into because of the power-outtage .. he ended up owing too much money to too many different people.

    Edit: Found link to one of the stories - http://www.lavalnews.ca/articles/TLN1601/rememberingIceStormTLN160102.html
     
  15. Lady_B

    Lady_B New Member

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    Jason, Years ago when I started ramping up on my preparedness supplies, husband tolerated my 'hobby' graciously. Over time, he admitted that it felt quite comfortable knowing that we were prepared. I would occasionally get him involved by asking questions about what he thought of this or that, and asking him to pick up some specific items now and then. He has since that time reached the same conclusions about the possibilities of TSHTF and no longer considers this just my 'hobby'. He's even brainstorming these days about either solar or wind power for us in case the grid goes down. Bet she'll come around once you get going on preps.
     
  16. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I am already partially living with solar power. I am already seeing benefits to using solar and 12-volt systems for lighting and entertainment. LED lighting is becoming easier to find so that you can add-in a second circuit to the house that runs on the 12-volt systems. I am using sealed-cell 12-volt batteries (UPS batteries) with solar panels to light up rooms now ... my wiring job is ugly as it is still just temporary - but - its giving me real-world practice before I go full-out and run the entire house on 12-volt.
     
  17. Fn/Form

    Fn/Form Function over Form

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    On this side of the border, the biggest city in the States lost power in 1977 and 2003. Memorable.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. GatorDude

    GatorDude Well-Known Member

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    Why do big financial services companies have data centers in their corporate offices and in far off, geologically, stable and protected areas?

    Why does the government have a site like ready.gov?

    Reasonable, thinking, people and organizations are getting prepared and a lot of horrible disasters have happened lately.

    I think the key is to maintain a sense of balance where you are prepared but not so obsessed that you don't have an enjoyable life.
     
  19. dukman

    dukman Greenhorn

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    I wonder what those two eyes in the shadow are from :eek::D
     
  20. GatorDude

    GatorDude Well-Known Member

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    I had some additional thoughts on this...

    1) Refer people to FEMA and the Red Cross disaster preparedness sites.
    2) Divorce preparedness from politics.
    3) Forget the firearms part.

    The neighbors don't need to know what you have in your arsenal. They can get their own weaponry. Alternatively, just minimize the firearms part saying you just got a couple of old guns you inherited.