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Survival and Handgun Podcaster
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Part of the business I'm in consists of selling products that prevent house fires. It's also a good survival topic. It's also important to know what to do if there's a fire in your home. Unfortunately, every day, Americans experience the horror of fire. But most people don't understand fire. Only when we know the real nature of fire can we prepare our families and ourselves. Each year more than 4,000 American's die and approximately 25,000 are injured in fires many of which could have been prevented. Nearly 1,000 lives are lost to fires that originated in the bedroom and about 100 firefighters are killed in the line of duty each year. Each year in the United States fires kill more American's than all natural disasters combined. About 80% of these deaths occur in residences and it is estimated that over 39% of residential fires and 52% of residential fatalities occur in homes with no smoke alarms. A working smoke alarm increases your chance of survival. Residential sprinklers have also become more cost effective to install in homes although few homes still have them. During the winter months, the potential for fires increase because of the use of Christmas trees, heating appliances such as the furnace, space heaters, and fireplaces as well as the increased use of lighting. House fires in the U.S. that are started by candles are at a 20-year high. Children playing with fire set over 100,000 fires annually and over 30% of those fires kill the children who started them. This is over 800 children killed each year by the fires they set playing. Studies of electrical fires in homes show that many problems are associated with improper installation of electrical devices by do-it-yourselfers. Common errors that can lead to fires include the use of improperly rated devices such as switches or receptacles and loose connections at these devices. A house fire is reported in the United States every 90 seconds this is an average of 1.9 million fires reported each year and someone dies in a house fire every two and one-half hours.

Some important things to know about fire:
FIRE IS FAST
There is very little time!
In less than 30 seconds a small flame can get completely out of control and turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house. In minutes, a house can be engulfed in flames. Most fires occur in the home when people are asleep. If you wake up to a fire, you won't have time to grab valuables because fire spreads to quickly and the smoke is too thick. There is only time to escape.
FIRE IS HOT
Heat is more threatening than flames!
A fire's heat alone can kill. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this supper hot air will scorch your lungs. This heat can melt clothes to your skin. In five minutes a room can get so hot that everything in it ignites at once: this is called flashover.
FIRE IS DARK
Fire isn't bright it's pitch black. Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness. If you wake up to a fire you may be blinded, disoriented and unable to find you way around the home you have lived in for years.
FIRE IS DEADLY
Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do!
Fire uses up the oxygen you need and produces smoke and poisonous gases that kill. Breathing even small amounts of smoke and toxic gases can make you drowsy, disoriented and short of breath. The odorless, colorless fumes can lull you into a deep sleep before the flames reach your door. You may not wake up in time to escape.

Do you have adequate some detectors and fire extinguishers?
I prefer the monitored some detectors, but any good photoelectric smoke detector is good.

Also, don't forget about your 60 second plan if there is a fire in your house.
 

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My current home will be up for sale probably this summer, the next home I have I WILL install a sprinkler system in it. Now I know if there is a chance of freezing it can't run in the attic but if I add 2x4's to the existing ceiling and another layer of sheetrock, I can run pvc pipe in that space. 1" pvc, sprinkler heads, could put a flow switch to an audible alarm for the added wake-up call, but this is something I have wanted to do for a long time. Of couse, fire extinguishers in every room, hardwired/battery back-up detectors in every room. If I ever could afford it I would also add more sheetrock, to be at least 1" thick, I think that is code for 1 hour fire rated. How's that.
 

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My current home will be up for sale probably this summer, the next home I have I WILL install a sprinkler system in it. Now I know if there is a chance of freezing it can't run in the attic but if I add 2x4's to the existing ceiling and another layer of sheetrock, I can run pvc pipe in that space. 1" pvc, sprinkler heads, could put a flow switch to an audible alarm for the added wake-up call, but this is something I have wanted to do for a long time. Of couse, fire extinguishers in every room, hardwired/battery back-up detectors in every room. If I ever could afford it I would also add more sheetrock, to be at least 1" thick, I think that is code for 1 hour fire rated. How's that.
I don't think PVC would be the best choice for feed-lines, they would melt in an intense fire thus defeating their purpose. San Diego, CA to the south of us has or did have a building code requiring interior sprinkler systems in new homes. Galv. pipe feed-lines and metal sprinkler heads.
 

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I don't think PVC would be the best choice for feed-lines, they would melt in an intense fire thus defeating their purpose. San Diego, CA to the south of us has or did have a building code requiring interior sprinkler systems in new homes. Galv. pipe feed-lines and metal sprinkler heads.
Galvanized pipe it shall be then, thanks! I would hope the with a good sprinkler system the fire would not get to that point, I don't know what temp the sprinkler heads are designed to activate though, another thing to look into.Thanks again.
 

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bczoom - you are the kind of person that gives us pub ed teachers nigthmares!!!!!!!!!:eek: LOL:rolleyes:
 
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