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Seeking The Truth
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This was on another thread so I thought I'd bring it up on its own thread.

What do you think about home schooling and do you have any kids your home schooling?

I have a grandchild who will be home schooled this year.
 

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I have always felt like it was a bad idea. As someone who spent most of my in Catholic school and a few years in public school, it was always really easy to tell which kids had been home-schooled. The kids who had been home-schooled are always very awkward and lacking in social skills. They frequently just do not know how to interact with other children.

I understand why it would be necessary to be prepared to educate your own children if there is a societal collapse. However, I feel as though people are setting their children up for failure by denying their children the opportunity to adjust to learning with others outside of the family unit. I can also understand that people would like to tailor what their children learn, but again, if their children are not learning the subject matter and style of education of the greater higher education system, they will not perform well in college.

I don't think that it is a good idea. Relate it to something else; think of the first time that you tried to rebuild an engine using only a Chiltons manual. Those manuals might give you a general idea of what to do, but there is generally a lot of mistakes and fumbling before you are competent enough in a skill to tackle it single-handedly. In addition, you may make mistakes which wind up being more difficult to fix than the original issue. Now, consider fumbling around with your child's education. Is that something that you really want to fumble around with?
 

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I have 4 school-aged kids and have thought about homeschooling quite a bit. I have several friends in my area who homeschool their kids and do a good job of it (most are in connection with a parent controlled co-op, so they get plenty of socialization). However, I have decided not to for two reasons-- 1. There is an excellent Christian school nearby and we are fortunate enough to be able to afford the tuition for all of our kids. 2. I am not sure if I have the patience to teach my kids every day. I also see that they respond well to people who teach in ways different than me.
I am totally open to homeschooling my kids if circumstances change, or become extreme, and totally respect anyone who decides to go that route. It just isn't the right road for us at this time.
 

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edirPsmaP
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I am homeschooling 5 out of my 6 children. The baby is a bit young for 'official' homeschooling! LOL! I LOVE it! My kids love it also! They were in public school for 4 years and after one year of homeschooling I asked them if they wanted to go back to public school and they all said NO WAY! My 15 yo DS has one more year of homeschooling and then he will be going to the local vocational school for electrician. My 14 yo will be going for mechanic when he is old enough. My 12 yo will be going for welding when he gets old enough. My 9 yo wants to be a baker and wants to open his own bakery. My 6 yo DD is leaning toward being a beautician but she is not entirely decided yet.
 

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UUGH. I homeschool all 3. My kids are perfectly NORMAL.

The whole stereotype about how homeschooled kids aren't able to socialize is total BS and absurd. Frankly, it's people making those kinds of comments that have me usually avoiding such threads.

Each story is different. Our local Public school-- one of the "best" in the whole city, tried to eliminate reading, writing, math, etc... because he wasn't learning by their terms. Well, duh-- he's dyslexic. Brought him home and within one year he went from a pre-k reading and writing level (in 3rd grade at that point) to ABOVE grade level.

If I had kept him in there, he would have eventually graduated high school without being able to read or write. Yeah, that's not gonna happen.

Fact is, nobody can tell my kids are homeschooled, unless we mention it. They usually act surprised by the fact.

My kids are socialized, better than many around here that ARE in public school. The idiot kid next door, in 6th grade cannot tell me what a verb is. So hows that great education he's getting?
 

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UUGH. I homeschool all 3. My kids are perfectly NORMAL.

The whole stereotype about how homeschooled kids aren't able to socialize is total BS and absurd. Frankly, it's people making those kinds of comments that have me usually avoiding such threads.

Each story is different. Our local Public school-- one of the "best" in the whole city, tried to eliminate reading, writing, math, etc... because he wasn't learning by their terms. Well, duh-- he's dyslexic. Brought him home and within one year he went from a pre-k reading and writing level (in 3rd grade at that point) to ABOVE grade level.

If I had kept him in there, he would have eventually graduated high school without being able to read or write. Yeah, that's not gonna happen.

Fact is, nobody can tell my kids are homeschooled, unless we mention it. They usually act surprised by the fact.

My kids are socialized, better than many around here that ARE in public school. The idiot kid next door, in 6th grade cannot tell me what a verb is. So hows that great education he's getting?
I suppose I should have specified that the Catholic schools all seem pretty solid; I wouldn't send a child to a public school, either.

As far as your kids seeming normal . . . I hope they truly are. I'm just saying that most of the time when I meet a kid who seems a bit "off", very often it will come out that they were homeschooled, and everyone goes, "ooooh. That makes sense." Sorry, I am just going off of my experience. Simply playing the odds, there must be a few anomalous kids out there who turn out well-adjusted.

I sincerely do not mean to offend anyone, but education is a subject about which I very strongly.
 

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The wanderer
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We homeschooled all seven of our kids and loved it. The last one 'graduated' last year and the oldest is 30. They're all successful, happy, well-adjusted kids adults, 6 our of the 7 are married and have produced 7 grandchildren so far. Some own their own businesses.

Turtle, I went to public grade school and Catholic High school. The big difference I saw is that the Catholic school kids had more money for drugs, alchohol, and cigarettes! :D

None of our kids are awkward. I think it helps nowdays, for some anyway, that there are active Home School groups. Our kids were able to be in plays/musicals, science fairs, sports, field trips with other home school families, etc.

While the last of our kids were in 'High School' homeschool there were 14 kids on our five miles of dirt road, and all but two of them were home schooled. They spent so much time out playing and goofing off with the other kids that if it hadn't been for the hours of schooling I'm not sure we'd have seen much of them, except that our place was often the hang-out place.

The important thing, Meerkat, is that you/parent/whoever take it seriously. It is a committment. The early years are the most important. They must learn the foundation of education: Reading, writing, and math. Seriously. If they don't get the basics of reading and writing/spelling, and simple math, it's almost impossible to get the rest of education later.

The nice thing about Home schooling is you KNOW where the child is at, education-wise. You know if they can read or subtract or whatever. Our kids got straight "A"'s because they didn't move on until they mastered what they were working on. Some kids started multiplication at a younger age (we're talking months, not years!) than some of our other kids, for example.

I loved learning with our kids Some things like science had a lot of new information since I was in school! The 'disturbing' thing was seeing things in their history book that happened in MY lifetime! Wow, was that weird! Cool, too, to be able to say "Hey, I remember that!"

The 3 of our grandchildren that are old enough for school are being home-schooled now by their home-schooled parents.

It's been a good experience for our family.

BTW, talking about "kids who seem a bit 'off'" turning out to be homeschooled...I think a lot of us can identify with certain attitudes that indicate a kid is a public school kid! :D
 

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Seeking The Truth
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
School is'nt what it use to be.What they teach most kids have no business knowing.
Most of history taught is half truths and outright lies.Full of agendas and socialism.Making weaklings of boy and bullys of girls.
My daughter did'nt realize how much school had changed since her grown daughters were school aged.No 7 yr. old needs to learn about sex.
School should have stuck to academics and left the raising to the parents.
 

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We home-school our son; he goes to a co-op, so he gets his socialization. He is also in scouts and plays sports at the Y. He was in a private school until we moved and we had to place him in public for one semester. We pulled him out because the teachers had no vision and no initiative, and he was literally in tears from boredom. My daughter, on the other hand, we started off in the public system and we'll keep her there until and unless the B.S. starts. Luckily for us, we got a lottery-placement into a charter school, so the quality will be higher due to more direct parental involvement. That's my experience. YMMV.
 

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Seeking The Truth
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We home-school our son; he goes to a co-op, so he gets his socialization. He is also in scouts and plays sports at the Y. He was in a private school until we moved and we had to place him in public for one semester. We pulled him out because the teachers had no vision and no initiative, and he was literally in tears from boredom. My daughter, on the other hand, we started off in the public system and we'll keep her there until and unless the B.S. starts. Luckily for us, we got a lottery-placement into a charter school, so the quality will be higher due to more direct parental involvement. That's my experience. YMMV.
I see you live in my hometown.I don't know if your black or white but i can tell you that most schools in Atlanta are out to destroy the black family'imo.
Ever read the 'SCAM'by Jesse Lee Peterson?How the Black Leadership Exploits Black Americans.Unles you live in Buckhead or some other high dollar area you may wan to check up on what they teach your child.This goes for any school in any state but especially ga.
 

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I am a little teapot
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We plan on sending our 2 year old to public school. My mom works for our school district and while they may do a few things I don't agree with overall the school district seems to be relatively normal.

That said, we have a neighbor who homeschools her 10 (ish) year old daughter. They live on a small farm and buy hay from us. We are becoming pretty decent friends with them and I find that a great thing because they are wonderful people. Gave us tons of advice when we were learning to can. Anyway, their daughter is one of the most well adjusted, polite, kind, caring young ladies that I know. She is courteous and respectful and is wonderful with my son. Also she is extremely intellegent.

This girl can walk up to any chicken, turkey, whatever on their place, pick it up, and carry it all over the yard.

So while (at this point) homeschooling is not something we are looking into, I'm certainly not opposed to it and I'd go that route rather than private school if the public system does turn out to be nuttier than squirrel poop.
 

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IMHO homeschoolers can't be generically stereotyped any more accurately than any other group of people.

My SIL was homeschooled as were all his 7 siblings (they used the high school for chemistry, sports, etc) and all of those kids are well adjusted, successful adults -- in both their personal and work lives.

On the other hand, my oldest daughter, who is a PA certified teacher, does PA Dept of Ed home school certifications for homeschoolers during the summer (PA requirement). Most kids she evaluates are doing better than public school kids academicaly and socially but there are some glaring exceptions. What determines those glaring exceptions? The parents.

The most common homeschooler disaster in our experience comes from the "enabler" parents. They will always have an excuse for why little Johnny didn't get his school work done. These Moms and Dads have poor parenting skills and continually allow themselves to be manipulated.

In short, dedicated, intellectually honest -- sometimes tough -- homeschooler parents almost always get the most out of their kids.
 

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My husband is a college professor and he finds that the homeschooled kids coming into his classes are much better prepared to do what it takes to learn and do well in his class than the public school kids. Many of the other professors we know say the same thing.

We also homeschool our son and he is 15, starting his second semester of college level classes, has learned to play drums, lead and bass guitar (mostly on his own), picks up periodicals such as Discover, Popular Science, and Education Technology ( to name a few) and reads them cover to cover. He reads history, science and current event books, articles, etc. just because he wants to. He decided to stop eating meat unless it was raised and slaughtered humanely all on his own, after he read about the meat industry. That was 2 years ago and he is very firm in his belief that animals deserve to be treated humanely. (Makes it hard for me to plan a meal sometimes, but I respect his decision).

When I pick him up from his college classes, he is hanging out with the kids who are anywhere from 2 to maybe 10 years older than him, having real conversations and getting along just fine. We belonged to a homeschool support group for about 5 years and he had parts in plays, took classes from other parents in a variety of subjects, belonged to cub scouts, 4H and other groups...his socialization has never been a problem.

He had no problem scoring very high in the college level range when he took the placement tests to start college. He has also taken the college exit exams that my husband brought home (out of curiosity). He scored higher than most kids who have earned their Associates degree.

I have taken a very laid back approach to homeschooling Joe. If he doesn't seem to be ready for a subject, we table it for a year. I have made sure that he stays up to speed in math and English, everything else just falls into place.

I agree wholeheartedly with those who say, it all depends on the parents and how they handle their child's education. I have seen people who take 'unschooling' way too literally and do absolutely nothing to teach their children. And I have seen some parents who are way too regimented and make learning a chore for their kids too. There is a balance and you have to remember that each child is different and needs to be treated as an individual.
 

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Seeking The Truth
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Some teachers and parents caught between a rock and a hard place.Many times the teachers who want to teach are blackballed by the others.Some parents have all they can do to care for kids and can't home school.
But those who live above their means and put possession above their kids don't have their childs best interest at heart.
In the news today another radical agenda is being pushed on our youth"Steers,Queers and Engineers'google it.Social engineering is not what education should be about.
teaching lies to minorites only causes more division and civil strife.Now many blacks and other minorities are attacking others in schools and in the streets.Being fed hate,lies and half truths is deadly.Since the schools cvame out with all this crap young black men actually live longer in prison than on the streets.Thank goodness some are waking up to the hustlers,but it may be too late and too little.When a 12 yr.old black boy is beaten to death for making good grades and 'acting white'something is terribly wrong.This kid parents did everything right,father was a good man who stayed with his family,then loses his son to thugs trained by the very schools he paid taxes to support.
 

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This was on another thread so I thought I'd bring it up on its own thread.

What do you think about home schooling and do you have any kids your home schooling?

I have a grandchild who will be home schooled this year.
I don't think it's a good idea. A lot of parents do it because they want to shelter the child from society. I think it's better for them to learn how to deal with other kids their age. The earlier they can do that the better. Otherwise by the time they're 18 they're a lot more naive than other kids their age.
 

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Seeking The Truth
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't think it's a good idea. A lot of parents do it because they want to shelter the child from society. I think it's better for them to learn how to deal with other kids their age. The earlier they can do that the better. Otherwise by the time they're 18 they're a lot more naive than other kids their age.
You can teach your child about things yourself.Not some stranger who may not have the kids best interest in mind.
Because of the breakdown of society by the radicals schools are no longer safe for innocent children.
When I was in school the worse thing was chewing gum,talking or throwing spit balls.The subjects were academics,not social propagandas and agendas.
Demonstrting to a child how to have oral and anal sex is not something most parents would sign up for. It makes me angey to even think about one of these people peeling a banana to show my 5th grade grandchild how to perform oral sex.This crap and much worse is going on now in many schools.
Somebody needs to speak out about the fall of this nation and indoctrination of it young.Now al boys have to do in school is say they are cross dressers and they can walk into any girls restroom or PE dressing room and have a ball watching them undress.This is'nt freedom,its bondage of the innocents.Wheres the freedoms to protect your kids innosence?
 

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I don't think it's a good idea. A lot of parents do it because they want to shelter the child from society. I think it's better for them to learn how to deal with other kids their age. The earlier they can do that the better. Otherwise by the time they're 18 they're a lot more naive than other kids their age.
My kids are home schooled. (aparently I wasn't) My point is, Between scouts, soccer and T Ball,They are learning enough social skills to help them deal with society. They get a better, one on one education, than the 1 teacher to 20 kids that the public school deals with. Every situation is different,But for us ,Home schooling just makes sence.
 

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I don't think it's a good idea. A lot of parents do it because they want to shelter the child from society. I think it's better for them to learn how to deal with other kids their age. The earlier they can do that the better. Otherwise by the time they're 18 they're a lot more naive than other kids their age.
It depends on what the goal is. If your goal is an 18 yo that possesses in depth knowledge about sex, drugs, & drinking, the public school system will get you that. If your goal is an 18yo with the sense to make positive choices for himself in these areas, find another option.

Call me crazy but our public school system's determination to discuss sex with young children is more than a little creepy to me. :eek:
 

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I don't think it's a good idea. A lot of parents do it because they want to shelter the child from society. I think it's better for them to learn how to deal with other kids their age. The earlier they can do that the better. Otherwise by the time they're 18 they're a lot more naive than other kids their age.
BillS, no offense but I'm guessing you don't have a whole lot of exposure to homeschooled kids. We have quite a lot of personal exposure to homeschooled kids and their parents. If I had to offer a percentage of success/failure, I'd put the number at about 90% of homeschoolers in our area are academically superior to public school, and at least equal socially. Half of the remaining 10% would be sunk regardless of where the go to school because of disfuntional parenting.
 
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