Homeschooling and Common Core

Discussion in 'Home Schooling' started by goshengirl, Oct 15, 2013.

  1. goshengirl

    goshengirl Supporting Member

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    I was thinking we weren't going to be touched by the Common Core debacle, based on the materials we use. Then today it hit me, we use Saxon Math, and Saxon Math is used in the schools. Granted, we use the homeschool program, but I don't know how that differs from the school program (if it does). Now I find myself thinking I should go ahead and purchase at least a few years' worth of materials - except I generally don't like to buy too far in advance, just in case we change curriculum. Anyone else in the same boat?

    We should be good with other subjects, and we generally aren't a textbook-oriented family. We've just got my 5th grader now, and we have a lot of materials from when my older two boys were schooled - so even if, say, Abeka aligns to Common Core, it won't be a problem (we use their economics and government programs).

    Is anyone else having concerns over Common Core and its reach into the curricula that homeschoolers use? Has it changed your purchasing patterns? It feels like we have to prep against Common Core. (Yeah, I know, I'm coming a little late to the party on this one...)
     
  2. DJgang

    DJgang I put SAs on IGNORE!

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    I don't know. We use Mother of divine grace syllabus.
     

  3. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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    I noticed that most boxed curriculum are turning towards Common Core.

    I am worried I won't be able to find non Core curriculum for Roo in a few years.
     
  4. FatTire

    FatTire Member

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    forgive my ignorance, but what is it about 'common core' that you dont like?
     
  5. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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    From my understanding of the info my mom gave me (public school teacher who retired this past June) there are a lot of changes made to how things are taught. The info is to be memorized without explanation as to why things are the way they are (grammar, math, etc). On top of the fact the grade levels are now lower than they have been in years. Such as first graders are being taught kindergarten basics as grade level material and "advanced" students are being taught the actual grade level material.
     
  6. goshengirl

    goshengirl Supporting Member

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    DJ, what does MODG use for math?

    Grimm, which box curriculum are you talking about? I know Alpha Omega comes in boxes, but that's all I can think of. I'd think the hard thing about planning for Roo is that with her age, you don't know yet what her learning style is, so it's hard to plan ahead.

    Fat Tire, I agree with Grimm. It's a general 'dumbing down' if you will. There are also a number of questionable (and outright crazy) reading excerpts in some of the reading comprehension - such as a passage regarding a woman finding out her husband is cheating on her, to be read and analyzed by third graders. 'Literature' removes material such as studying Huck Finn and replacing it with studying an EPA pamphlet. Not that children shouldn't be able to read EPA pamphlets, but literary analysis requires a higher degree of cognitive ability, and I do not want that left out of my child's education. Math seems to be more about guesswork than, well, math. I'm betting Common Core will do to math what sight words have done to reading. Common Core is teaches to a low ability, and that's not why I homeschool.
     
  7. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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    I am using boxed curriculum as a general term for the majority of companies that put out both homeschool and public school curriculum.

    I have been looking at getting basic grade level unit studies and scope and sequence to give me ideas as to what she should be learning and when. I figure foe now having some good text books to help me form lesson plans to see what her learn style is can be helpful. I just don't want the dumbed down books...

    FYI I just found out they are trying to get the P.C. fairytale books as part of the public schools libraries.
     
  8. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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    The new history textbook they were showing teachers before my mom retired had a passage saying the participants of the Boston Tea Party were anti American terrorists.

    :brickwall:
     
  9. DJgang

    DJgang I put SAs on IGNORE!

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    GG, sorry that I missed your question about math.

    Abeka in early years and Saxon in later. Although some are using teaching textbooks. We use abeka and Saxon with Dive DVDs.
     
  10. DJgang

    DJgang I put SAs on IGNORE!

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    I think if you stay away from history and social studies books written in CA (please no offense) you'll be OK.

    Use maybe McGuffey Books for reading, and you can find lots of list for real literature history books. We use abeka history but supplement with readers and literature.

    Basically get your hands on old stuff :)

    Robinson curriculum is a good resource as well.
     
  11. dixiemama

    dixiemama Well-Known Member

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    Bub is in public school that has CC. They don't 'teach' anything. We have bought old encyclopedia sets and books so he can learn when he has free time.

    They haven't taught the kids why the days are longer during the summer and shorter during the winter.
     
  12. FatTire

    FatTire Member

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    I can see why you think, and i tend to agree, that common core is bad. But, when i was in school I was taught that columbus discovered america. My kids were not taught this, so that is, i think, a step in the right direction. They still dont teach all of the facts, and there doesnt seem to be an effort to gain historical context. Huck Finn is still banned from many school libraries.

    Clearly columbus was a brutal murderous guy. But taken in historical context, he wasnt that far from the norm of his society.

    I taught both my kids basic math in much the same way i was taught, with memorizing times tables, and doing long division, tho i taught them both very young. Now in fifth grade, calculators are used. I think thats fine, for the world we live in. I dont think you really start to learn math until calculus anyway, the rest is just arithmetic. The latter teaches you to count, the former teaches you to think. The problem is, I think its likely we wont always live in the kind of world we do now.

    Its probably a good idea now to be teaching our kids to speak chinese, and learning it ourselves...
     
  13. dixiemama

    dixiemama Well-Known Member

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    They are still teaching Columbus discovered America in Kentucky. When Bub questioned his teacher on it (lots of NatGeo and History Channel at our house), she told him in hushed tones away from the other kids he was right but that they wldnt let her teach it. He only has a 15 minute social studies class anyway.

    They are also teaching that the War Between the States was about slavery, Americas involvement in Vietnam was justified, that Korea was just a skirmish and that that the Holocaust only targeted Jews. The only reason I keep him there is his friends. We are so isolated where we live that none are close in proximity. He learns what he needs to learn at school to pass but learns the truth at home.
     
  14. FatTire

    FatTire Member

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    yeah but its kentucky, they also teach that the earth is 6k or so years old.. ;):dunno:

    Public school helps teach smart kids how to deal with stupid people, so thats a benefit.. other than that, the system is pretty broken
     
  15. dixiemama

    dixiemama Well-Known Member

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    True. Bub did score higher in math on the standardized test than any other 4th grader in his district.
     
  16. DJgang

    DJgang I put SAs on IGNORE!

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    You got it! Learn the truth at home!
     
  17. goshengirl

    goshengirl Supporting Member

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    We have our neighbors that border one side of our property to give my son that experience. :rolleyes:


    Dixie, I think those things are taught everywhere, not just KY. Of course, I'm just across the river in OH, so it may be regional.


    DS#3 absorbs history the way a sponge absorbs water - he can't get enough and from all different sources. And what he knows is generally different from what is taught in PS. I used to think this would negatively effect his standardized test score (we're not overly concerned about test scores, but it's something to be aware of since they can open or shut doors down the road). However, the past two years he's gotten every answer right in the social studies section of the test - he's apparently also learned how he's 'supposed' to answer those questions. ;)
     
  18. dixiemama

    dixiemama Well-Known Member

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    Goshen-- I think Bub has too. When I try and help with his homework all he says is 'teacher went over how we are supposed to do it'. She does one prob with them to show how it has to be done. As soon as he's finished tho he has tons of questions that we research until he's satisfied he has the right answer. He either prints or writes them down for future reference.

    Its sad that the truth isn't taught tho. People are so worried about kids excelling in all these subjects that they aren't really learning anything.
     
  19. goshengirl

    goshengirl Supporting Member

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    Dixie, your Bub sounds like a super young man. So diligent to spend time with you learning more and keeping information for future reference. That will serve him well in life. :)

    And you are absolutely right that it's a shame so much misinformation is taught. And more so, the kids are taught how to regurgitate, and not how to think.
     
  20. Grimm

    Grimm There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.

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    I'm curious is anyone else uses dramatic play as a teaching tool?