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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know how it happened so quickly, but Cam will be four in April :cry: he drives me crazy asking " what does that say?" all the time so it's time to start thinking about teaching the boy to read. It's been 17 years since I've homeschooled a little one, boy are there a lot more choices now! What has your family really enjoyed & got a lot out of? Anything really seem interesting?
 

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We are working on phonics with Roo. She has an interest in wanting to read but since she has a slight speech impediment we are starting on phonics. Sight words are also part of this. These are all flash cards I got at the Lakeshore Educational store. (or my mom passed on to me)

I'm not sure if a basic preschool lesson plans are below Cam but I have a Montessori based set if you want to take a look. One is the lesson plans while the other are the worksheets and visual aids.
 

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The Preschool Prep company has a series (dvds, board and paperback books, workbook/coloring books) that we have used. On their website they are crazy expensive, but I found them cheaper on groupon and zulily.
Google for preschool printables of various theme/unit studies he's interested in.
If you watch tv, turn on closed captioning while he's watching his shows.
Read billboards and signs out loud wherever you go.
Read labels at the grocery stores out loud. Make grocery lists with pictures and words.
Maybe something I've listed helps. :)
 

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It's good to teach phonics. That's what I learned in school. My stepson was taught "whole word". Even after paying to send him to private school afterwards he's never fully learned phonics. I remember spending a lot of time in grade school learning to divide words into syllables and how to pronounce them.
 

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There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.
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The Preschool Prep company has a series (dvds, board and paperback books, workbook/coloring books) that we have used. On their website they are crazy expensive, but I found them cheaper on groupon and zulily.
Google for preschool printables of various theme/unit studies he's interested in.
If you watch tv, turn on closed captioning while he's watching his shows.
Read billboards and signs out loud wherever you go.
Read labels at the grocery stores out loud. Make grocery lists with pictures and words.
Maybe something I've listed helps. :)
I made labels for Roo's toy bins with the names of the toys and pictures. Some of these are labels for toys she has not gotten yet but are in the gift tote for future presents.
 

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Phonics and more phonics. I use a series called Explode The Code. They're inexpensive, but aren't colorful. Super program! You can also do it on line.
Math-u-see is also a super math curriculum. Have tried some other stuff, but have always come back to these for the little ones.
You can find both on Ebay, Amazon, or Christian Book Distributors
 

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I don't know how it happened so quickly, but Cam will be four in April :cry: he drives me crazy asking " what does that say?" all the time so it's time to start thinking about teaching the boy to read. It's been 17 years since I've homeschooled a little one, boy are there a lot more choices now! What has your family really enjoyed & got a lot out of? Anything really seem interesting?
When they start asking, "What does this say?" it's the time to start teaching them to read. When they are excited about reading, they learn in no time. If you wait until they lose interest, it's a lot harder.

I homeschooled for 19 years, "retiring" in 2009. Here are some of the materials I found effective......

"Teach Your Child To Read In 100 Easy Lessons" is the absolute best for teaching a child to read. Ten minutes a day with the child sitting on your lap going through the lesson, and in about 80 days he will be reading independently. You'll need something else for handwriting and spelling to supplement.

Miquon Math with cuisenaire rods were my favorite for K-3rd grade, although I think my daughter-in-law is using Singapore Math. Miquon is very economical and great for teaching the child to think mathematically.

For history, I read aloud to the kids, especially any living books (written by people that were there). History is "all the best true stories that have ever been."

For science, we did things. Science is "the art of curiosity." Ask a question, then look stuff up to find the answer.

You might also want to look into the Charlotte Mason method. Lots of free Charlotte Mason materials at Ambleside Online.

Don't forget the arts and crafts!

Good luck. It's like riding a bicycle; you never forget! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Phonics and more phonics. I use a series called Explode The Code. They're inexpensive, but aren't colorful. Super program! You can also do it on line.
I used these books with the older kids & loved them! I didn't know they had it online, I'll have to check that out!
 

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They are absolutely the best!

Phonics and more phonics. I use a series called Explode The Code. They're inexpensive, but aren't colorful. Super program! You can also do it on line.
Math-u-see is also a super math curriculum. Have tried some other stuff, but have always come back to these for the little ones.
You can find both on Ebay, Amazon, or Christian Book Distributors
EXPLODE THE CODE!
I bought myself a copy of each of them, along with the teacher guide and some of the keys. Since I didn't have a budget for stuff like them, but I could make copies until the cows come home, I made them up, bound them and had a closet full of them, ready for students. Incoming students were given the placement test, and given the books where they were. If I had students who struggled with reading, which was not that common, it was truly because they had dyslexia or other learning disability.

There are inexpensive phonetic readers that are a great accompaniment to them. Colored pictures are great, but I got a set with black and white, and again made copies until the cows came home. Students would read them to my assistant, one on one, every day until they had read through the whole series. They were sent home with a copy of the book they were working on. Christmas break was my mark to see where all first graders were at. Had they worked through series? If they had, I wasn't concerned about their reading. Those who had not gotten through the series were on my radar and were the first to read to parent volunteers.

This is the black and white readers series I like. The workbooks are not as thorough or complete, IMHO. http://eps.schoolspecialty.com/prod...-word-study/primary-phonics/about-the-program

There are children who learn sight words easier than phonics. It is how they learn. Children who are like this need to be worked with to make sure they learn phonics. I had/have a check off list of 1200 sight words. I have pages that were put into a 3 ring binder with the words larger for the children to read through while I ticked off what they knew and didn't. I didn't go through the whole list at once, but broke it into bits. A younger child might only try the first 10 words before we quit. A little more advance child would read more until they reached the place where they had 10 words or so that they did not know.

Sight words were then written on index cards, using good print, and put into a packet for each child, for the words they needed. Each day these words were read and notes made for what they could do. A date stamp on the back of the card in one of two places, one for needs work, or got it automatically. Words can be added while a few words that are newer, but they know, kept. The words they know give them a feeling of success and add to their fluency.

It seems that we cannot add word or excel files. If we could, I would add my high frequency list. I actually have digital files of many things, but not able to share here.
 

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When they start asking, "What does this say?" it's the time to start teaching them to read. When they are excited about reading, they learn in no time. If you wait until they lose interest, it's a lot harder.
Montessori called this a sensitive period. You are absolutely right on about it. Many people have no idea that a 3 or 4 year old can learn to read.

For history, I read aloud to the kids, especially any living books (written by people that were there). History is "all the best true stories that have ever been."
Personally, I love history. The stories that bring it to life make it so much more meaningful. I am not recommending using movies to teach history, but as a way to enrich it, to bring it to life. There are many movies out there that do just this. I have been on the waiting list at my library to read "Centennial" by Mitchum. At the same time I got put on the waiting list for the movie series. It has violence in it, so it is not a good series to watch with young children, but it brought the history of Colorado to life for me.

I learned more about the American Revolution and Cornwall from The Patriot. I believe I learned about many things that I never hung onto while in school because I am a visual learner. I am also a person who focuses on some aspects of a movie when I view it. Watching the same movie a few times helps me to better assimilate it in my brain.
 

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Personally, I love history. The stories that bring it to life make it so much more meaningful. I am not recommending using movies to teach history, but as a way to enrich it, to bring it to life. There are many movies out there that do just this. I have been on the waiting list at my library to read "Centennial" by Mitchum. At the same time I got put on the waiting list for the movie series. It has violence in it, so it is not a good series to watch with young children, but it brought the history of Colorado to life for me.

I learned more about the American Revolution and Cornwall from The Patriot. I believe I learned about many things that I never hung onto while in school because I am a visual learner. I am also a person who focuses on some aspects of a movie when I view it. Watching the same movie a few times helps me to better assimilate it in my brain.
I love history as well. I found that in school I didn't absorb anything I didn't read myself. I learned more reading the text book out of boredom than any movie or lecture could have taught me.

This is how I past more of my classes than when I did the homework/classwork and/or attended lectures/took notes.

I do have a large Elizabethan period movie collection. It was for visual concepts for costumes. But then who doesn't like watching one of Shakespeare's plays turned into movies?! ;)
 

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We have a special needs child at home.

Year before last we had issues with the public school system as well as issues from time to time in years earlier. Year before last year we decided that we were NOT going to medicate our child for school since we realized that she was like a zombie on her meds. We were pretty much told without them actually stating it that they were not going to give her any extra help if we did not medicate her.

We now home school her and she is doing so much better. She loves history and we found old school books at estate sales and garage sales that state history as I was taught and not like they teach today. (On a parent teacher visit we noticed they were using text that showed Elanor Roosevelt and Martin Luther King Jr. as founding fathers?????)

She has many interests along the lines of science, math etc. A lot of her education now comes from real life teaching such as helping me do math for construction projects, animal science on the farm and a lot of outdoor studies.

She now works at her own pace and is not sitting at the back of the room being ignored.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm so glad to hear things are going well for y'all Lastoutlaw! Homeschooling was a huge blessing in our lives both as a family & as individuals when we homeschooled our older kids & I look forward to homeschooling Cam.
 

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We've been homeschooling for two years now and I highly recommend Classical Conversations. They use the classical education model, and I can tell you my 8th grader went from average to amazing.
 
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