Homemade Carbon Arrows for Compound Bow?

Discussion in 'Hunting & Fishing' started by mrbroker, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. mrbroker

    mrbroker One Chance

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    Anyone attempt to make their own carbon arrows for their compound bow? If so, where did you get quality carbon shafts of the right diameter? At roughly $12 bucks a piece retail, this can be an expensive addition to the storage room. It would be great to make a hundred or so arrows for a fraction of the price.
     
  2. JeepHammer

    JeepHammer Well-Known Member

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    I pointed this out to the archery bunch a while back when they started rattling on about how a bow never runs out of ammunition...

    "What Happens when you bend/break your arrows?"

    Dead silence.

    I don't shoot much anymore, and I think the wood arrows I can pump through my recurve bow would be easier to replace since wood will be available for some time to come...
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    Carbon fiber arrows (Molded Hollow Carbon) shafts take a vacuum autoclave to manufacture.
    They take VERY proprietary resins to set the carbon fibers, so virtually impossible to manufacture 'At Home'.
    You would be stuck with buying long sticks, cutting them with abrasive disk to length, and assembling from there.

    Much more labor intensive and more parts to stock than reloading rifle ammunition, and 1/20 the range, much less knock down.

    Solid carbon shafts (Graphite) aren't easy to make either, so that also would require power tools, large stock piles of parts, ect.

    I would say to hang around the archery shops or get some online searches going for the base material manufacturer.
    Sooner or later you are going to see the source on the label the archery store gets their stock in from,
    Or you are going to find an online supplier that can ship to you in bulk.

    Don't forget the knocks, quills, threaded head inserts and the heads!
    Also, you will need a jig to assemble your arrows,
    A saw to cut the blanks to length, and if I were you, I'd go with a diamond saw since about anything else will chip and separate the carbon layers when you try and cut to length.