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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks NaeKid! I'll repost my message from the other thread ( http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f26/rants-raves-general-gaaah-20812/ ):

My school year changed drastically yesterday. I withdrew my 14 year old son from the local high school, per his request. He wants another year to get ready for high school; We aren't sure we really want him back there anyway..so with the help of a dear friend, I'm putting together his Freshman course of study. We've got the core subjects lined out, but we(she's into prepping too) want to put together a Life Skills or Practical Knowledge course, incorporating resources geared towards independant living..we can't call it Prepping 101, but what a golden opportunity to teach our sons skills that will help them forever. We also can't call it Home Ec, although elements of that discipline certainly would be there. We thought we'd have the boys journal about their reading and practical projects, as well as make sure to take lots of photos. Oh, and those blog posts and youtube videos need to be recorded as well, almost forgot those! Now, I need to compile a list of books for them to read. Ideas and suggestions welcome!
 

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My son is a bit younger than yours (5th grade), but we, too, have a subject I call 'Life Skills.' As far as the state of Ohio goes, all they know is the name. ;) I've worked our schedule so that we have a large block of time on Friday afternoon allotted for this subject, sort of as a reward at the end of the week since it is a fun subject. However, my son can work on projects during his free time, any time he wants to (or as necessary, depending on the project).

Basically, our Life Skills is made up of several unit studies that, in my opinion, fall under that category. What we consider to be life skills changes as my son gets older. This year our Life Skills unit studies are:

Carpentry (helping Mom build a 12x8 shed, including site prep)
Canning (we've done this in the past, but now ds is taking more ownership of the process, from caring for the brambles, to picking, to canning)
Pawpaw Paradise (this is his ongoing development of a pawpaw patch - he's talked to local experts about habitat and site location, secured seedlings and some grafts from different sources to ensure pollination, etc)
Cooking Science (we have a unit study by that title, it's very basic, but we're also very behind on this subject)
Woodworking (more whittling than carpentry)
Leatherwork (basic stamping and stitching)
Marksmanship (he's in 4H shooting sports, and he can work on this any time, but school related activity is when he puts together a display board on gun safety or some other information compilation and display of knowledge)
Library Skills (like cooking, we are behind on this, so we have a unit study course on this as well)

I don't know if any of that helps your brainstorming at all. For our older boys (in college now) we used Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace homeschool materials, and highly recommend that. What sort of subjects are you thinking of?

I like the idea of documenting with Youtube videos. We didn't have our older boys do this sort of thing, so I don't have any sort of high school age documentation experience (yet). I do know that if I'd tried to get my older boys to journal about anything, it would have been met with great resistance. I'd probably call it a logbook instead, lol. When my boy gets older, I could see having him document his projects with photos and some sort of media presentation (powerpoint?), or maybe have him write a how-to essay, using photos.

Really curious to see what subjects/projects you want to tackle with this. :)
 

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If you homestead you could call the course Agriculture and it is his daily chores around the gardens and animals. When I was in high school we use to have to pay to take the agriculture class and all we did was tend the kitchen's garden. :(

In grade school we had a S.E.L.F (Student Environmental Learning Facility). Once a week we would go out to the SELF and learn about farm living. Things like candling eggs, poisonous plants and general livestock care. The SELF is still there and being used by the school. I took Roo a few weeks ago to get her first experience with goats, chickens, rabbits and sheep. She LOVED it.

As far as books for your boy, may look for some WWII make, mend, reuse books put out by the war department. They have the basics on making do with little and getting the most out of everything you do have on hand. Maybe some WWII cookbooks so he learns about stretching every little bit of food.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you homestead you could call the course Agriculture and it is his daily chores around the gardens and animals. When I was in high school we use to have to pay to take the agriculture class and all we did was tend the kitchen's garden. :(

In grade school we had a S.E.L.F (Student Environmental Learning Facility). Once a week we would go out to the SELF and learn about farm living. Things like candling eggs, poisonous plants and general livestock care. The SELF is still there and being used by the school. I took Roo a few weeks ago to get her first experience with goats, chickens, rabbits and sheep. She LOVED it.

As far as books for your boy, may look for some WWII make, mend, reuse books put out by the war department. They have the basics on making do with little and getting the most out of everything you do have on hand. Maybe some WWII cookbooks so he learns about stretching every little bit of food.
I didn't think of WW2 cookbooks; I have some pantry cooking books, and Dining on a Dime, as well as a couple of other frugal cookbooks scattered around the house. I even have some of the ebooks in the Dining in a Dime series printed out in binders. I think I need to make these books required reading for everyone over the age of twelve..which would be everyone who lives in my house or frequents it on weekends, not counting grandkids. My 14 year old loves to tinker, and he's a budding cook..his scrambled eggs are always good, which is more than I can say for my own. One project my friend mentioned wanting to get our boys to do is to build a solar heater for their rooms. I could go for a solar dehydrator, myself.
We are making plans to go to the state fair, probably next weekend. I'd like to see if we can generate some interests while we're there. I will be looking for ideas and hope I am the mom who brings home the most pamplets and free pencils. And a yardstick...a yardstick would be lovely. I promise to not sneak out with a llama or alpaca. Really.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My son is a bit younger than yours (5th grade), but we, too, have a subject I call 'Life Skills.' As far as the state of Ohio goes, all they know is the name. ;) I've worked our schedule so that we have a large block of time on Friday afternoon allotted for this subject, sort of as a reward at the end of the week since it is a fun subject. However, my son can work on projects during his free time, any time he wants to (or as necessary, depending on the project).

Basically, our Life Skills is made up of several unit studies that, in my opinion, fall under that category. What we consider to be life skills changes as my son gets older. This year our Life Skills unit studies are:

Carpentry (helping Mom build a 12x8 shed, including site prep)
Canning (we've done this in the past, but now ds is taking more ownership of the process, from caring for the brambles, to picking, to canning)
Pawpaw Paradise (this is his ongoing development of a pawpaw patch - he's talked to local experts about habitat and site location, secured seedlings and some grafts from different sources to ensure pollination, etc)
Cooking Science (we have a unit study by that title, it's very basic, but we're also very behind on this subject)
Woodworking (more whittling than carpentry)
Leatherwork (basic stamping and stitching)
Marksmanship (he's in 4H shooting sports, and he can work on this any time, but school related activity is when he puts together a display board on gun safety or some other information compilation and display of knowledge)
Library Skills (like cooking, we are behind on this, so we have a unit study course on this as well)

I don't know if any of that helps your brainstorming at all. For our older boys (in college now) we used Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace homeschool materials, and highly recommend that. What sort of subjects are you thinking of?

I like the idea of documenting with Youtube videos. We didn't have our older boys do this sort of thing, so I don't have any sort of high school age documentation experience (yet). I do know that if I'd tried to get my older boys to journal about anything, it would have been met with great resistance. I'd probably call it a logbook instead, lol. When my boy gets older, I could see having him document his projects with photos and some sort of media presentation (powerpoint?), or maybe have him write a how-to essay, using photos.

Really curious to see what subjects/projects you want to tackle with this. :)
I didn't mean to document ON youtube videos.. I meant, be sure to include documentation for any videos they watch that pertain to their studies. Although, I know somepeople do videotape certain projects for their kids' studies..certainly, it makes sense to record a speech/demonstration that would otherwise be lost if only the immediate family sees it.
As for logging, that's probably what he'll do for daily work, with a dedicated journal/spiral for specific topics. The thing I want him to get used to, is keeping track of his time spent. His dad does this every day, using a notepad feature on his computer at work, because once a year, he's required to write a report detailing all that he's done in the past year. This is used for his evaluations for raises and bonuses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I Don't know if you can cross the border for curriculum, but Alberta education offers Green certificate courses, not the leftist type of green, Agriculture based. these are considered Grade 12 courses here, your area might offer something similar.
http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/grc6643
I don't think this is feasible for us; the distance is a major hindrance, but what a wonderful opportunity. This is like 4-H on steroids! Years ago, we heard John Taylor Gatto speak at a homeschooling convention about the merits of work education/apprentiships. He would love this program.
http://johntaylorgatto.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
http://http://www.clp.org/store/by_grade/17

Christian Light has texts on topics like Auto & Home Repair & Maintenance, would that fit into what you had in mind?
I'd forgotten about them, and they've really added to their electives since I first had high schoolers. I think back then they just had an auto maintenance course. I will show this to my husband and my friend. Thanks!
 

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I'd forgotten about them, and they've really added to their electives since I first had high schoolers. I think back then they just had an auto maintenance course. I will show this to my husband and my friend. Thanks!
We used their woodworking one when hubby taught wood shop to a group of hsers & their dads, it was pretty good. It saved us some shop time by teaching some basics so that their time in the shop could be more productive.

Hubby is actually working on writing e-books to teach basic woodworking skills to 8-12 year olds. The books will have links to video demonstrations of each saw & skill.
 

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tsrwivey said:
http://http://www.clp.org/store/by_grade/17

Christian Light has texts on topics like Auto & Home Repair & Maintenance, would that fit into what you had in mind?
For some reason, the link didn't take me to their site, but I googled them and found them. Thank you for posting. I had forgotten the name, and wanted some of their elective curriculum. http://www.clp.org
 

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I think you're doing great job by homeschooling your kid as it helps in enhancing their skills more properly. It seems you're doing lot of stuffs to teach your kids and reading is very important. Definitely, you would be one of great reading tutor.
 

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We have been working on Bub's home school curriculum for next year and this has given me many great ideas! Thanks

Sent from my MB886 using Survival Forum mobile app
 

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I think you're doing great job by homeschooling your kid as it helps in enhancing their skills more properly. It seems you're doing lot of stuffs to teach your kids and reading is very important. Definitely, you would be one of great reading tutor.
Ouch. Your English is good, but it is not great.

OK, who are you really - and where did you come here from?
 
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