Heavy Hitter Okra

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by SouthCentralUS, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. SouthCentralUS

    SouthCentralUS Well-Known Member

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    I planted about 60 okra seeds April 28. We have had okra for dinner 3 times now. I have never had okra this early before. If you like okra, check out the heavy hitter okra. It was developed by a former science teacher who is in Talequah OK.
     

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  2. bacpacker

    bacpacker Well-Known Member

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    Plants look nice. We have picked one mess so far. I always plant Red Burgundy. But your plants look much better. Where did you get your seed?
     

  3. SouthCentralUS

    SouthCentralUS Well-Known Member

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    I ordered them from Ron Cook at Heavy Hitter Okra @ g mail.com

    You can save seeds for next year. I am very pleased.
     
  4. bacpacker

    bacpacker Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I've had the same line of seed for probably 10 years. Now you have me chain another kind. :)

    Course I'm always tryin new stuff to see how they do here.
     
  5. tsrwivey

    tsrwivey Supporting Member

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    What do y'all do with your okra? The only way we like it is battered & fried so we're in desperate need of some ways of making that stuff edible. It grows well here & produces long after everything else has succumbed to the heat, so we want to like it! Recipes, tips, & tricks please!
     
  6. SouthCentralUS

    SouthCentralUS Well-Known Member

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    The only way I like it is battered and fried, but my husband likes it boiled with tomatoes and onions. I canned some for him last year.

    This year I plan to dehydrate some.
     
  7. tsrwivey

    tsrwivey Supporting Member

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    They might be good to dehydrate & add some sort of seasoning to & eat dry? They are really good freeze dried but until we win the lottery or those machines go down in price 95%, I'll have to settle with buying them in the store.
     
  8. phideaux

    phideaux Dogs breath

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    I had them once, from Amish country I think, that were dehydrated , sliced the long way and glazed in some kind of sugar glazing.:cool:

    They were awesome.

    They also had dill pickles that same way.



    Jim
     
  9. SouthCentralUS

    SouthCentralUS Well-Known Member

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    Update - this is the same okra as in the first photo. I have picked about 100 pods from these 2 plants. Over run with okra. See how they branch out from the bottom? All the branches bear fruit. This okra doesn't grow straight up like a cane pole.

    And the dehydrated okra is awesome.
     

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  10. bacpacker

    bacpacker Well-Known Member

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    A little late getting back to this thread. We always just bread and fry ours. I've never had it dehydrated, but I will be trying that soon. We have put 4-5 gallons cut up in the freezer and ate several meals worth. Also gave away several meals worth. We are still picking about a half gallon or so every couple of days. We've even started letting 4-5 go so we'll have plenty of seed at the end of the season for next year. I'll end up leaving 20-30 for seed.

    One trick my wife has found that has made a nice difference. When she cuts a pod, she also cuts the leaf below the pod. This stimulates the plant to grow taller. Our plants were really short, when she started cutting the leaf off on half the plants they started growing much better. They are now twice the size after about a month.
     
  11. Meerkat

    Meerkat Seeking The Truth

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    Good idea also works good on fig trees. I just snapped off lots of leaves yesterday from figs. Will sure use this on my okra. Thanks.
     
  12. bacpacker

    bacpacker Well-Known Member

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    With the figs, are you taking the leaves off after picking figs? I have a small fig tree and it has not yet begin to bear fruit.
     
  13. crabapple

    crabapple I sold my soul to the internet

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    We never cut the leaves & the okra stalks got over 6 feet.
    When the freezer was full my father let the last pods fill out & dry on the stalks.
    We saved about 2 pounds of seeds & planted them over the next five years.
    The rest of the 1/2 an acre, we plowed under, years later, I learned I could have sold them as dried arrangements.
    But the reason for this post is we went out to dinner tonight & Had pickled okra, that had been breaded & deep fried like the fried pickles.That was a first for me.
     
  14. heavyhitterokra

    heavyhitterokra New Member

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    This is Ron Cook. I'm the guy who developed Heavy Hitter Okra on our certified organic farm in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. I am also currently working with Glen Hamner of Panama, as we continue to develop other varieties, by crossing Heavy Hitter Okra with feral okra plants found growing wild in the tropics.

    We are also hosting a 2016 HEAVY HITTER OKRA PLANT PHOTO CONTEST. Send photos of your plants with sample pods displayed at the base of the plant to: heavyhitterokra@gmail.com

    1st prize is $50.00
    2nd prize is $25.00
    3rd prize is $10.00

    Deadline is October 31st, 2016
    Who knows? You might be the 2016 Heavy Hitter Okra, Photo Contest winner?

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts about gardening and growing okra
    Ron Cook
    DRY CREEK FARM
     
  15. tsrwivey

    tsrwivey Supporting Member

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    I tried a new to me recipe I found in Hobby Farm magazine for okra. You slice it in half longways, shake it in a bag with olive oil, salt, & pepper, put cut end down on a cookie sheet then bake at 425 30 minutes. It was so good I ate them all!
     
  16. SouthCentralUS

    SouthCentralUS Well-Known Member

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    That sounds really good.
     
  17. SouthCentralUS

    SouthCentralUS Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ron. Thanks for dropping by. I tried to follow up over at Seed Savers but apparently hit the wrong button because my post disappeared. I am over whelmed with okra.
     
  18. heavyhitterokra

    heavyhitterokra New Member

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    In late April of 2010, I double planted 4 rows of Heavy Hitter Okra seeds on raised beds, 24" inches wide. I planted the seeds in a zig-zag pattern, one seed on each side of my center drip line, about 12" inches between each seed diagonally. Each row was about 150' feet long.

    By mid-July, I was harvesting as much as 100 pounds of okra per week for the Farmers' Market. That was my best okra year ever, but as things like that often go, by mid-August, "OKRA" had become a four-letter word.

    We were absolutely burned out on okra for a few seasons after that. We had given okra away to everyone we knew, plus we had frozen, dehydrated, and pickled so much of it that it took several years to eat it all.

    Last year (2017) my quarter acre garden was flooded out twice and I lost my entire crop to mildew and 8 days of standing water, so this Winter was spent pining away at the thought of having another really big okra crop.

    It was my goal initially, to double plant four long rows the way I had done back in 2010. But in real life, in my zealousness to get back to gardening, I actually double planted six rows of Heavy Hitter okra.

    Though four of the six rows are 150' feet long, one row is 180' feet long, and one row is 200' feet long. I may have to solicit help from my neighbors, come harvest time.

    It's my goal to have an old-fashioned, fill the freezer, family day, come August.

    This is the year of our family's huge family reunion. It would be great to turn them all loose in my garden with a paring knife and an empty grocery sack. It's been a lot of years since we've done anything like that.

    My poor Aunt Cindy went with me one Autumn, to harvest a seed increase on 5 acres of okra that a friend had planted for me. We were not expecting the rows to be 600' feet long when we arrived that frosty October morning.

    By the end of the day, her SUV was filled to the brim with paper grocery bags full of dried okra pods. There was barely room for the two of us to fit inside on the ride back home.

    A few days later, we shelled out 26 pounds of premium okra seed from those hundred or so grocery sacks. If you figure there are from 5,000 to 8,000 okra seeds per pound, then we harvested somewhere between 130,000 to 208,000 okra seeds that day. (It makes my hands itch, just thinking about it now, but we had a great time shelling out those seeds).

    Those were my promotional days, back when I was still trying to get the name, "Heavy Hitter Okra" into the public's collective consciousness. As a result, I gave away heavy hitter okra seeds at every farm show, County Fair, and Ag. conference I could find in the tri-state area.

    I gave away close to a quarter million seeds over the course of the next year, in hopes of getting a few people to try my newly developed strain of heavily branching okra.

    Apparently, that strategy is slowly beginning to pay off. I can see that over 46,000 people have read my okra thread on the Green Country Seed Savers website. When I type in a Google search for Heavy Hitter okra seeds, I see pages of links now. Only a few years ago, no one had even heard of that name.

    It took a lot of years to get to where we are today. I never dreamed so many people enjoyed growing okra.

    It brings back great memories for me, when I'm out there in my okra patch. I can almost see my Grandma Fannie again, with my mama, as all my Aunts, Uncles, and cousins, harvest okra for the long Winter.

    Sharing with friends and family. . . In my mind, that's what gardening is all about.

    Today, I think I'll start planting cucumbers and squash.