Heating with a forced air wood burning furnace

Discussion in 'General Homesteading & Building' started by HELIXX, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    Anyone here ever tried this type of heating?
    I'm really liking this stove.
    I would though have second motor with a 12 or 24 volt DC so I could run it off batteries hooked to a diesel generator.
    Yukon Eagle Wood and Coal Furnace
     

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    Last edited: Mar 25, 2011
  2. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    I know several people that have similar setups. All very much like them.

    It appears your picture has been cropped but many of these new stoves require electricity for more then just the blower. As I recall, if they recognize there's no 110v AC, they mechanically shut down for safety reasons. The thermostat, dampers... would all need bypassed in your scenario. If I did it, I'd use the genset to power it but then put an inverter on your batteries and continue to use AC power instead of trying to switch everything to DC electric. BTW, for AC, does it want 110v or 220v?
     

  3. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    Thanks so much for your polite reply sir :)
    I'm sure the AC unit runs off 220 as most of them do. If the world goes south at least we'll have forced heat sans some jury rigging.
    The generator does have 220 on it. ;)
     
  4. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    Pedal power to the squirrel cage blower?

    I pulled up their site but the installation manual page is giving me a 404. I'm scratching my head on why this unit would need 220v. The blower motor is the bulk of the electrical needs and they could get by with a 110v motor.

    220v inverters are available so you can use that instead of a genset but they're typically more expensive (compared to 110v)

    I just talked to my friend who has a similar unit. He said his uses 110v.
     
  5. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    A lot of people in north centeral BC used this type of furnace to replace propane furnaces, most of these people have gone to a passive thermalmass type heater instead, because of the furnace's reliance on electricity. you may want to look into this type of heater instead. The forced air type of heating is not as efficient because it heats the air which in turn heats you, requiring higher temperatures.
    We heat with a wood fired heater , and do not like forced air heat at all now, we are also able to keep the thermometer temp 10 degrees lower and still feel comfortable. Of course this is all personale decisions, but I would recomend that you research passive heating before investing in a system that requires an electrical embilical cord.:2thumb:
     
  6. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    I have a Tarm dual fuel (oil/wood) heater that is like that one. It's a boiler, not forced air but still basically the same and yes, it does take electric to run. If you want off-grid style heat you need a good old fashion wood stove.

    They cost more up front, but pay for themselves in a few years. Let's face it, energy ain't getting cheaper. You might as well get it now.

    If you have "normal" heat now, you can set them up to work together. If the wood burn out the gas/lp/oil heater kicks in and the wife doesn't complain about getting cold. :)

    It might be more trouble than it's worth to convert it to 12v dc. It most likely has two 110v ac blowers and 24 ac control circuits. Use your genset to charge batteries and use an inverter to run the heater. That's my back up plan.
     
  7. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    There's is 110 sorry I thought your were talking about the existing heater.
     
  8. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    We found a unit we like better and the motor is included in the price. The motor is also 3 speed.
    These folks are much much easier to deal with on the phone and only $80.00 to deliver a 700 pound unit. ENERGY KING Wood Furnaces & Coal Furnaces
    The motor on this is external with a cover on it so converting it to a 12 volt motor when need would be easier. I would probably pick up a tread mill motor off ebay. Or if someone has a better motor for this application please chime in.
    Only we need two for our application as this on only works for 3000 sq ft. Actually we need three but I'll just close some vents off on nonessential rooms.
     

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    Last edited: Mar 25, 2011
  9. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    This is a newer version of the one we have. Ours is about 8 years old and has only 1 blower.

    The 1557M Hotblast Furnace works alone or in conjunction with your existing furnace to heat your entire home, while drastically reducing home heating costs. Twin 550-CFM blowers, Manual draft control, extra heavy duty cast-iron grates and liners. Firebox Construction of single front - Full 7 gauge with Firebrick Lining. Wood or Coal burning furnace. This unit is only sold at your local TSC store. The weight is 500 lbs.
     

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  10. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the heads up. Here's the link.
    United States Stove Company
     

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  11. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    The first one you listed looks like a gasifier like my Tarm. They are built to burn hotter, make almost no soot and use much less wood. The second one you listed looks like a standard add on wood stove. That probably explains the price difference. Some companies don't use the word gasifier since they are not technically gasifiers, but you check the efficiency to see if you are comparing apples to apples.
     
  12. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    Here's the link to your stove. Looks like it heats water for a radiator type heating?
    Home heating systems using wood burning boilers from TARM Biomass
     
  13. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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  14. MrSfstk8d

    MrSfstk8d Well-Known Member

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    It would probably be prudent to consider maintenance in your purchasing decisions. I say that because I've serviced industrial boilers more than twice myself. A couple of times a year, we'd shut it down, let it cool (a bit), open the ends out and "punch" the draft tubes. What I mean by that is basically taking a big, long bore brush and punching the honeycomb of tubes that pass the hot combustion gas through the boiler cavity. Other services would include inspection of floats, switches, seals, material condition, etc. and state required inspections.

    Forced air furnaces use something similar, although in most residential types it's more like radiator fins. The design for a solid fuel system is going to be different than a propane/lpg/ng system, obviously, but must get the same effect. What you'll have to look out for will be periodic cleaning.

    While the wheels are still on, commercial services to do this type of periodic maintenance will be available. But keep in mind, if you're looking for long term self sufficiency, you may have to consider the possibility of having to do this yourself. To this end, you'll no only have to consider clean out of the chimney and smoke box, but the heat exchanging guts of the system too.
     
  15. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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  16. unclebob

    unclebob Well-Known Member

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    If you want heat ducts to each room? (Without power) The only way to achieve it is to duplicate the coal furnaces of years gone by.
    They had a spider web duct work that each run rose gradually up to each room near the center of the house. They pulled the cold air from the floor near the outside walls.
     
  17. Centraltn

    Centraltn Well-Known Member

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    What ever happenned to the old regular woodstove for heating your house. The vermont castings is the most efficient for its price range and you can cook on it too. It WILL keep a 2000 sq ft house very warm in winter. I had one and loved it. It also burns its own smoke so you're not sending a signal to anyne where you are.

    I'd give my right arm for enough solar power to run the AC in summer but afraid itd be nigh on impossible to afford.
     
  18. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Mr.S We've got the maintenance covered :)
    Veg Gear DIY WVO Conversions and Green Energy: Cleaning a Tarm Dual Fuel Wood Gasifier Boiler

    Older systems, both hot air and hydronic used gravity, but many modern cir pumps only draw bout the same power as a light bulb. I'm luck that my house is old enough to have 3" main branches so I can get some gravity circulation going. But without power you lose the gasifier effect anyway so a battery back up is a good idea.

    My last house was a slip level and converted the fireplace to a Franklin Stove. It did a great job of heating the house since it was on the lower floor and you could on it in a pinch. Some rooms were cooler and some warmer. No ducts or blowers just gravity, but the only cost was time and 2 stroke chainsaw fuel, who can complain? We went about 5 yrs without running the NG fired heater. Now We're burning veggie oil with wood and NG for back up. I can aim a hose and turn on a pump, but I can't cut wood all day like I used to do.