Hawk attacked my chickens/ducks

Discussion in 'Hunting & Fishing' started by Aemilia, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. Aemilia

    Aemilia Zookeeper

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    IN my yard :gaah:. Thankfully they are all okay, the last two just came out of hiding. I'm wondering will the hawk return?

    My husband heard the commotion and scared the hawk away. I've never had one in the yard before, sometimes they fly overhead. (I'll start leaving the big dog in the yard more often, that might help a bit.)

    So should I keep my chickens/ducks on house-arrest in their coop/run?

    And yes, we could legally shoot the hawk, but I don't think that's a viable option as a rifle bullet would be unsafe, and I think a shotgun would do more harm than the bird. Would a BB gun deter the hawk?
     
  2. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Glad you didn't feed it anything! Will the chickens or ducks need counseling for post traumatic stress? The dog is probably the best idea.
     

  3. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    I hate the thought of shooting a Hawk, and flat will not shoot an Owl as it's my spirit animal... really long story.. but there it is... as for your problem... Hawks mate for life, kill one and the other dies .. but you have to do what you feel you need too , we lose a lot of chickens to all the crites in the woods, but we have so many that we never run out of eggs, and they are free range so.... the ducks seem to fall to the Owls but now they sleep on the big porch with the big white grt pere.. She's happy with her living down blankie, they are happy with their warm feeties... win win..and no Owls... still we lose a lot of them and all the turkeys are now gone.. damn yotes.. those will be dead after we get moved out of town very soon... the Bob cats are harder to deal with...they are everywhere..
     
  4. SurvivalNut

    SurvivalNut Retired Army

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  5. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    ... of course, it depends on what you mean by "mate for life". These creatures do mate for life in the social sense of living together in pairs but they rarely stay strictly faithful. About 90 percent of the 9,700 bird species known pair, mate, and raise chicks together... some even returning together to the same nest site year after year. Males, however, often raise other males’ offspring unknowingly. DNA testing has revealed that the social-pair males of the groups tested did not father 40 percent of 'their' chicks. Apparently, while the male is out philandering around, the same thing is happening back at his nest. Black vultures, though, discourage infidelity. All nearby vultures attack any vulture caught philandering.

    Less than 3 percent of the 4,000 mammal species are monogamous (and Homo sapiens isn’t one of them). Beavers, otters, bats, wolves, some foxes, a few hoofed animals, and some primates live together in social pairs but dally sexually much as birds do.

    :hmmm: I wonder when Jerry Springer will be doing a 'chickenhawk episode'... :lolsmash:
     
  6. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    I'm not sure how many chickens you have but have you considered a chicken tractor?
     
  7. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    Hey Blob.. yanno, I've heard that all my life but never checked the facts.. So I did start looking, not done but I found out something else I never knew.. Hawks mate in flight!!! now there's a trick!! I couldn't mate standing up much less walking...lol

    I did hear about a couple of sky diver who... well anyway ...:D
     
  8. Aemilia

    Aemilia Zookeeper

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    Wow that dragonfly thing looks cool. I'll have to keep my eyes open. And are you offering PTS counselling MMM? Because I have one chicken who might need it - she's missing the most feathers too.

    I have four hens, and hope to get more this year (mine are getting older). I don't have a chicken tractor, I couldn't find plans for a stable unit that seemed light enough I could move it alone. If this problem continues I'll have to do that. Perhaps something with wheels on one side.

    I love animals too, and hawks are beautiful when they aren't attacking my animals. I don't love them more than my chickens though, especially not more than my cat.

    But they were out yesterday afternoon with the dog out in the yard, and all were accounted for.

    And the first thing I read when I get up is:

    ROFL!!!
     
  9. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    Aemila... I do understand, I get really po'd when something wants chix dinner.. I figure the Crites figure that a dumb Chicken is easier lunch then something they really have to work at...
    Your Siggy say's your in Insanity Montana... why would you wanna live in Missoula???:D:D:D
     
  10. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Sure, let me check my appointment book ...
     
  11. Clarice

    Clarice Well-Known Member

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    We have been keeping our eye on a hawk in our area. So far it is only catching mice in the huge field behind our place, for which we are grateful. We have close to 75 hens and 50 chicks. We do sell our eggs so can't afford to loose any hens. We enjoy watching the hawk but would not hesitate to shoot if it threatened our livelihood.
     
  12. GroovyMike

    GroovyMike Well-Known Member

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    Be aware that shooting a hawk is a felony, and yes they DO prosecute for that.
     
  13. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    In 1985, a national survey of US Fish and Wildlife Service and Cooperative Extension personnel was conducted. Nearly all noted that the economic damage caused by raptors is minimal on a national scale, but can be locally severe if depredation occurs on fowl or livestock that are relatively valuable and vulnerable. Cost estimates of damage ranged from $100 to $10,000 per report and from $500 to $194,000 per year.

    All hawks and owls are federally protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 USC, 703-711). These laws strictly prohibit the capture, killing, or possession of hawks or owls without special permit. No permits are required to scare depredating migratory birds except for endangered or threatened species (see Table 1), including bald and golden eagles.

    In addition, most states have regulations regarding hawks and owls. Some species may be common in one state but may be on a state endangered species list in another. Consult your local USDA-APHIS-Animal Damage Control, US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and/or state wildlife department representatives for permit requirements and information.

    Trapping is usually permitted only after other nonlethal techniques have failed. Set traps in the threatened area where they can be checked at least twice a day. If possible, experienced individuals or agency personnel should conduct the trapping and handling of captured birds.

    The Swedish goshawk trap is a relatively large, semipermanent trap that can be used to capture all species of hawks and owls. It consists of two parts: a 3 x 3 x 1-foot (90 x 90 x 30-cm) bait cage made of 1-inch (2.5- cm) mesh welded wire. A trap mechanism consisting of a wooden “A” frame, nylon netting, and a trigger mechanism is mounted on the bait cage. A hawk or owl dropping into the trap will trip the trigger mechanism and be safely trapped inside. Pigeons make very good lures because they are hardy, easily obtained, and move enough to attract hawks and owls. Other good lures include starlings, rats, and mice.

    The Bal-chatri trap is a relatively small, versatile trap that can be modified to trap specific raptor species. Live mice are used to lure raptors into landing on the traps. Nylon nooses entangle their feet and hold the birds until they are released. The quonset-hut type bal-chatri was designed for trapping large hawks and owls. The trap is made of 1-inch (2.5-cm) chicken wire, formed into a cage that is 18 inches long, 10 inches wide, and 7 inches high at the middle (46 x 25 x 18 cm). The floor consists of 1-inch (2.5-cm) mesh welded wire with a lure entrance door and steel rod edging for ballast. The top is covered with about 80 nooses of 40-pound (18-kg) test monofilament fishing line. Pigeons, starlings, house mice, and other small rodents can be used as lures. The trap should be tied to a flexible branch or bush to keep a trapped bird from dragging the trap too far and breaking the nylon nooses.

    Spring-net traps are ideal for catching particular hawks or owls that are creating a damage problem. Square spring nets, hoop nets, and the German “butterfly trap” have all been used successfully.

    A landowner must obtain a permit from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and usually the local state wildlife trap on top of each pole. The jaws must be well padded with surgical tubing or foam rubber and wrapped with electrician’s tape. Run a 12-gauge steel wire through the trap chain ring and staple it to the top and bottom of the post. This allows the trap to slide to the ground where the bird can rest. Some states prohibit the use of pole traps.

    If necessary, landowners can safely handle and transport hawks and owls. The key to successful raptor handling is to control the bird’s feet. The talons can easily grasp a careless hand and inflict a painful injury. There is significantly less chance of injury from the wings and beak. The safest approach, regardless of the type of trap, is to toss an old blanket or coat over both the bird and trap. The darkness will calm most birds and make them less able to defend themselves. Reach in carefully with your bare hands and grasp the bird’s lower legs. Control the feet to avoid getting “footed.” Pull the bird out of the trap so that it is clear of any object on which it could injure itself. Fold the wings down against the body and hold them securely. Check the bird for any signs of external injury, such as cut feet or legs, excessively battered feathers, or scalping (the splitting of the skin over the forehead). If the bird is injured, have a local veterinarian examine it, or in extreme cases, transport it to the nearest raptor rehabilitation center.

    All hawks and owls are protected by federal and state laws. There are cases, however, in which they can create public health and safety hazards or seriously affect a person’s livelihood. Contact your local USDA-APHISADC office first if you are interested in obtaining a shooting permit. The USFWS and state wildlife agencies may issue shooting permits for problem hawks and owls if nonlethal methods of controlling damage have failed or are impractical and if it is determined that killing the offending birds will alleviate the problem. Permit holders may kill hawks or owls only with a shotgun not larger than 10-gauge, fired from the shoulder and only within the area described by the permit. Permittees may not use blinds or other means of concealment, or decoys or calls that are used to lure birds within gun range. Exceptions to the above must be specifically authorized by USFWS. All hawks or owls that are killed must be turned over to USFWS personnel or their representatives for disposal.
     
  14. GroovyMike

    GroovyMike Well-Known Member

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    A fellow I know is involved with competitive pigeon flying. The feds had a two year undercover operation that ended in 8 arrests from California to Pennsylvania of pigeon owners who had killed hawks. Yes, thats a 2 YEAR federal investigation with undercover agents funded by your tax dollars to prosecute shooting 8 birds to protect other birds.....
     
  15. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    :mad: freaking know-nothing govt. cogs whose only job is to justify their job... wow, it's The Circle of Crap
     
  16. Aemilia

    Aemilia Zookeeper

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    Appearently not in Montana according to the Game Warden, at least if it is attacking your animals.

    ETA: Besides, its not like I'd call them and brag about it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2010
  17. Aemilia

    Aemilia Zookeeper

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    Unbelievable. Sadly, not surprising. :dunno:
     
  18. GroovyMike

    GroovyMike Well-Known Member

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    Your game warden is wrong. At least according to the feds.

    The sad part is that this is a felony conviction which means that you can never legally own a gun again.
     
  19. Aemilia

    Aemilia Zookeeper

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    Could be, he said "as long as it was not an eagle".

    After doing some research on an unrelated issue it seems the state and the fed don't always agree on laws, and it depends on if the feds want to still charge you even though you are within your states laws. On this particular issue the feds will leave you alone if you are within the states laws. :gaah: comforting.

    Anyway, don't worry. I can't fire off a rifle or pistol here due to geography. And I'm not shooting a shotgun towards my birds/dogs/horse. No sign of the hawk, and my birds are all accounted for. A couple are pretty scruffy looking, I guess they'll be like that until they molt?
     
  20. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Can't say for anywhere else but around here if you cap off an endangered or protected species in defense of your livestock you will not be persecuted (I mean prosecuted).