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Does anyone out there eat Hares (Snowshoes or Jackrabbits)?? If not, why not. We have them all over out here, very few cottontails. If you do eat them, how are they? Never tried it myself but in an emergency, why not?
 

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Don't know about in Montana but here the jack rabbits carry diseases that can be passed to humans, Tularemia, Encephilitis, Q fever, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. If you decide to try them please, wear gloves when handling them to prevent the lice, mites, fleas and ticks from biting you and cook very very thoroughly. I've heard that you have to boil them for 6 hours before you can chew them anyway.;)
 

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Snowshoe hares are decent eating. I personally believe cottontails taste slightly better but the difference is slight. Those I've eaten were tender and took no extra preparation. The snowshoe hares are larger. With rabbits and hares always check the liver for color and spots. If it has white spots don't eat the rabbit. Other than that take the same precautions you'd take with any other meat. I've found that disease is most prevalent when the rabbits are at their peak cycle. Also, if one was diseased usually most in the area had the same problem. I've had times I shot ten or more cotontails out of the same corner of a field and had every one of them be diseased yet those I killed a mile down the road were fine.

Jackrabbits are decent eating. I've heard people say they were tough but those I've had were fine. (But I haven't eaten many of them so maybe I got lucky?)
 

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I think there's something about the fat on the back of the neck being yellow also? Or is that only home bred rabbits?
 

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performing monkey
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MMM hit it out of the park with the seasonal variance (usually parasites :eek: luckily there are visual clues, and common-sense precautions are very helpful in preventing spread to you)
 

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So, hunt them after the first hard freeze? That would break the life cycle of the parasites and kill off alot of the sick ones, right?
Darn, now I want to try one.
 

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So, hunt them after the first hard freeze? That would break the life cycle of the parasites and kill off alot of the sick ones, right?
Darn, now I want to try one.
Don't count on a freeze making it safe. I've killed rabbits in the snow and still had some with tularemia (rabbit fever). When hunting look over the general condition of any animal you kill or see. If they're lethargic or sickly looking (generally dull fur, listless, open sores, eyes matted or running, etc.) go somewhere else. When dressing them out always check the liver for color and white spots. Any doubts, throw it out.
 

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performing monkey
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the many of the parasites live inside the animal... so, unless the rabbit froze to death (solid) you have to worry, but Late Fall & Winter rabbits ARE better/safer (last week of October to thru 2nd week February) IMO
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Don't count on a freeze making it safe. I've killed rabbits in the snow and still had some with tularemia (rabbit fever). When hunting look over the general condition of any animal you kill or see. If they're lethargic or sickly looking (generally dull fur, listless, open sores, eyes matted or running, etc.) go somewhere else. When dressing them out always check the liver for color and white spots. Any doubts, throw it out.
If you did eat a sick rabbit what would be the symptoms?
 

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If you did eat a sick rabbit what would be the symptoms?
"The incubation period for tularemia is 1 to 14 days; most human infections become apparent after 3 to 5 days.[13] In most susceptible mammals, the clinical signs include fever, lethargy, anorexia, signs of septicemia, and possibly death. Animals rarely develop the skin lesions seen in people. Subclinical infections are common and animals often develop specific antibodies to the organism. Fever is moderate or very high and tularemia bacillus can be isolated from blood cultures at this stage. Face and eyes redden and become inflamed. Inflammation spreads to the lymph nodes, which enlarge and may suppurate (mimicking bubonic plague). Lymph node involvement is accompanied by a high fever. Death occurs in less than 1% if therapy is initiated promptly."

Tularemia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This sounds bad but the incidence rate of tularemia is less that one in one million. When you learn all the different sources from which you can get it, hunting plays a minor role. Cases (and one death) were documented in Martha's Vineyard where they became infected by mowing the lawn. (Good argument to not mow the lawn, right?:eek:)

The absolute best thing a person can do with any meat is thorougly cook it. Heat kills most of the bad guys.
 

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Slightly off the subject, but most rodents (rabbits, squirrels, groundhogs, etc) have a lymph gland under each arm pit. It is greyish brown and sticky/fatty. When cleaning, bend the forearm back and pinch the node between your thumb and knife blade to remove. Much of the "gamey" taste comes from those nodes, particularly with ground hogs. I never had jackrabbits or hares, but I'd guess they are the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
"The incubation period for tularemia is 1 to 14 days; most human infections become apparent after 3 to 5 days.[13] In most susceptible mammals, the clinical signs include fever, lethargy, anorexia, signs of septicemia, and possibly death. Animals rarely develop the skin lesions seen in people. Subclinical infections are common and animals often develop specific antibodies to the organism. Fever is moderate or very high and tularemia bacillus can be isolated from blood cultures at this stage. Face and eyes redden and become inflamed. Inflammation spreads to the lymph nodes, which enlarge and may suppurate (mimicking bubonic plague). Lymph node involvement is accompanied by a high fever. Death occurs in less than 1% if therapy is initiated promptly."

Tularemia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This sounds bad but the incidence rate of tularemia is less that one in one million. When you learn all the different sources from which you can get it, hunting plays a minor role. Cases (and one death) were documented in Martha's Vineyard where they became infected by mowing the lawn. (Good argument to not mow the lawn, right?:eek:)

The absolute best thing a person can do with any meat is thorougly cook it. Heat kills most of the bad guys.
What about dogs can they catch tularemia from eating sick rabbits.
 

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Tularemia (Rabbit Fever) in Dogs

It's not very common and doesn't effect dogs as badly as other species. Also, a PMR raw fed dog passes his food within 4 hours not allowing bacteria to grow in his system. Probably part of why they are such good carnivorous scavengers. Inappropriate ingredients (grain, vegetables, etc) slow digestion causing over-growth of bacteria.
 

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sense, anyway, if shtf. Every other way is a waste of resources and/or exposes you too much to the looter types. You want to drink the broth, cause a lot of nutients boil out into the water.
Boiling and stewing are good ways to cook meat but to go so far as saying they are "the only ways that make sense" is stretching it a little. Sure you lose a little more of the nutrient value other ways but some people like them better fried or barbecued and different cooking techniques can add at least a little variety to the menu ... even if the main dish is the same.
 
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