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Aesops Ant (not Aunt)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this while reading on a site that HomesteadGal posted on here yesterday. This site describes an antique hand crank ice maker that was used before refidgerators (it basically is a refridgerator).

I am curious, is there a modern equivalent? I can see this attached to a windmill or something to make ice if there were no power. Its an interesting concept and SURELY there is something like this out there yet I cant find a thing.
 

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Reverend Coot
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A modern version, no, not what I've ever seen. Sure there prolly some still round, price would be killer on one though.

Antique equipment dealers be the place ta start ifin yall really wan't one.

A gas powered one could be built with a belt drive compressor an somebody willin ta do the refrigeration work, but again ain't gonna be cheap.
 

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Aesops Ant (not Aunt)
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A modern version, no, not what I've ever seen. Sure there prolly some still round, price would be killer on one though.

Antique equipment dealers be the place ta start ifin yall really wan't one.

A gas powered one could be built with a belt drive compressor an somebody willin ta do the refrigeration work, but again ain't gonna be cheap.
I was afraid someone would probably say that. I was just thinking about how much I would miss good ole southern sweet iced tea when :shtf:
 

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Happy in the hills
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449 Posts
Well the other thing you can do, is to start an ice house.

We moved an old one room school house, boarded it up, insulated it, and covered the floor with sawdust. In the winter we went out to the pond or a neighbors stream and cut blocks of ice, hauled it to the ice house, and layered it in alternately with sawdust. Free sawdust from all the mills in the area. Used a hay elevator to get it up to the top. Come summer, we had plenty of ice to sell to all the picnics and fairs.

It's work, but it's worth it....and only if you're in a place where it freezes :)

I'd love to get a handcranked ice maker!
 

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I am a little teapot
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2,696 Posts
If anyplace would have new ones it would probably be Lehmann's and I don't remember ever seeing anything like this in their calendar or the store itself, but I've never been looking for anything like this so I could have missed it.
 

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Aesops Ant (not Aunt)
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you for the replies -- still intersted to see if you guys come up with anything else! How else am I going to drink iced tea after SHTF?
 

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Registered
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Thank you for the replies -- still intersted to see if you guys come up with anything else! How else am I going to drink iced tea after SHTF?
You can move up here to the cold place with us- cold in the winter- too frigging hot in the summer... but great fall and spring.
 

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edirPsmaP
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Just looked on Amazon- you can buy new one for $170! hand cranked. There are a few smaller ones for about $100 too.
So they are out there.
Do you have a link? I can only find ice cream makers.
 

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Happy in the hills
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449 Posts
After some searching, I've found something that may be of use for small amounts of ice making. The site is no longer alive, so I used the Wayback Machine at archive.org to pull it up.

The Ice-Quick is a small device to demonstrate the adsorption technology with the sorption pair water/zeolite. It consists of a zeolite filled cartridge, connected via an adaptor to a plastic cup, which contains some water, and which is evacuated by means of a hand-vacuum pump.

Ice from Pump

This uses a vacuum pump to allow iIce production without any electric power.





Take a plastic cup and fill not more than 1 cm (0,4 inch) of water into it. Place the system on a flat surface.

Check that the PVC-hose is fixed to both the adaptor and the pump. The cartridge is firmly tightened to the adaptor.

Connect the cartridge and the adaptor to the plastic cup.

Operate the vacuum-pump continuously, but not too fast. Push the piston-rod to the very end. Overcome the resistance of the final air-cushion.

Check the tightness of the unit after approx. 2 strokes by lifting the cartridge. Because of the produced vacuum, the cup with the water is firmly tightened to the adaptor

After approx. 10…20 strokes the inside pressure is reduced below the vapor pressure of the water at the ambient temperature, and the water starts to boil. Air gases go out of the water and start to bubble on the bottom of the glass. (The more air is removed out of the system, the stronger becomes the adsorption of water vapor. The vapor above the water surface is adsorbed in the cristalline structure of the zeolite. As a result the remaining liquid water cools down.)

After a few more strokes the water calms down and begins to freeze. Wave the water-cup and the cartridge several times so that water can reach the surface, and continue the operation of the vacuum-pump. (At the same time the zeolite gives out the heat of adsorption. After 1…2 min the heat can be felt on the outside of the cartridge. With a heat exchanger it is possible to use little heat in existing aggregates, for example, for heating water or on an air stream.)

The adaptor has a small flap. Lift it briefly in order to let air into the system, so that the cartridge and the adptor can be removed from the cup.

This process can be repeated 8…10 times with arbitrary intervals until the zeolite is saturated. The zeolite has always to be cooled down to the ambient in between processes for the adsorption to function properly. For the regeneration the zeolite granulate needs to be activated by heating it at 250 °C in the oven
 

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The wanderer
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Keep in mind, for anyone thinking about making an ice house, that frozen water from ponds or any surface water is still not safe to drink until purified. Chipping some off a block and putting it in tea could make you sick.

However, you could chip some off and use it like an ice bucket to chill the tea.

Here in the north we could freeze drinkable water in jugs or trays, then store it in the ice house, buried among the blocks, in a water-tight container and put the ice IN our tea! :D
 

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Happy in the hills
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449 Posts
Keep in mind, for anyone thinking about making an ice house, that frozen water from ponds or any surface water is still not safe to drink until purified. Chipping some off a block and putting it in tea could make you sick.

However, you could chip some off and use it like an ice bucket to chill the tea.

Here in the north we could freeze drinkable water in jugs or trays, then store it in the ice house, buried among the blocks, in a water-tight container and put the ice IN our tea! :D
You ma'am, are correct! Frozen pond water is just that, pond water, and requires the same treatment before drinking.
 
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