Great Lakes Island Living

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by IslandNewt, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. IslandNewt

    IslandNewt Libertarian Individualist

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    I'm attracted to island survivalism in the Great Lakes due to the large amount of fresh water available and the geographic isolation you would find.

    Would the general rules of Survivalism change much in an island setting? The islands that I've visited are very warm in the summers and due to the Lake Effect manage to have warmer winters than the mainlands.

    You would be able to grow a lot of food on your own, and populated islands tend to be self-sufficient in terms of energy.

    Opinions?
     
  2. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    Not sure which lake you're talking about, but have you been here in the main Great Lakes area during the winter?
    Lake Superior is super cold with above average snowfall. That goes for any islands located there.
    Lake Michigan is also much colder than you would imagine in the winter and the fact that you state that they stay warmer than inland is only fractionally true. Do you consider 15° F at the lake shore /islands that much warmer than 13°F inland- you also must take in the key word--Lake Effect Snows depending on which side of the big lakes you are. One area of Michigan just got a whopping 30 inches in a 24 hour period.
    Lake Huron is just as cold as Lake Michigan with problems with Lake Effect Snows on the Canadian side.
    Lake Erie might be a fraction warmer than the big three and Lake Ontario is at a more northerly position than Lake Erie.
    Not to forget that most of the Islands big enuf to hold people already hold tons of folks who live there. so the price of any kind of land on an Island in any of the Great Lakes is going to very high.
    Another thing to remember with any of the Great Lakes in the winter--sure they might be just a tad warmer than the inland around them but the high humidity and damp make for some very cold and uncomfortable living . Trust me I have lived in Michigan most of my life and have spent time during the winter near/at the lake shore and it is not all rosy like one might think.
    But in the heat of summer there is usually always a breeze coming off the lake so the heat and humidity are not as bad as inland.

    Well there now--didn't I just sound like a big old Debbie Downer!:eek:
    Sorry about that, but somethings sound really good till ya go there and check them out.