Grains: Alternative kinds of grain for storage

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by lanahi, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. lanahi

    lanahi Well-Known Member

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    I thought this was an interesting brief discussion of the different kinds of grains and the possibility of using them in our storage plans. We talk about wheat and rice but little about the others.
    The Food Storage FAQ - Grain Varieties

    I'd like to get buckwheat for breads, pancakes, and planting. The grain is easy to grow on very poor soil and less than favorable weather. It is a better grain for diabetics and for those who develop gluten intolerance.

    I also have a little amaranth that I will be planting. It grows wild here and competes well with weeds, but I'd like to spread it so more is available.
     
  2. mdprepper

    mdprepper I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...

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    Great link, thank you.
     

  3. Emerald

    Emerald Well-Known Member

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    There is another grain that many people might not have access to. But quite a few of you might. Wild rice. Not many people realize that it is starting to come back along many of the rivers here in MI.. I know that many people here along my river have no idea what that "grass" is growing along the river now. It was not here when I was younger, but they did have it farther up north and over in Wisconsin and Minnesota and probably some of the Canadian provinces.
    We have a canoe and I have studied how it is harvested and processed for long keeping. I have in fact processed just about 2 cups worth last year, it is the short grained one than the one that many see in the stores mixed into the rice mixes. But definitively wild rice and tasty, but again hard work. But might be worth it if I have the whole family to help me in hard times.
     
  4. lanahi

    lanahi Well-Known Member

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    You are lucky to have wild rice there. I think it's mostly limited to northern states and Canada, but it would be worth experimenting with in other places too, or to spread it in it's native region along other water courses. It's a plus that few recognize what it is.
    Survival will be harder work than we have it now, that wild rice will be well worth the effort then.
    Planting wild rice requires seed that is only a few hours away from the plant it comes from, so you cannot order viable seed that I know of. There may be ways of saving it to keep it viable...it has to be kept wet, I know.
    Wild rice