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I have been hard pressed to find a good company with Gluten Free food storage. Any one have any ideas?
 

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The wanderer
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Gluten-free as in what kinds of foods? Wheat-substitutes like gluten-free bread mixes and non-gluten flours? Can the gluten-free foods made by companies such as "Gluten Free Pantry" be vacuum sealed and stored with O2 absorbers in airtight buckets?

What about things like rice, lentils, and beans, they're gluten free. I've never been clear on which other grains are gluten free: Oats? Barley? Corn?

I'm going to assume you mainly mean to replace wheat. That can really be tough because even eating with every-day shopping is tough when you must avoid gluten.
 

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My daughter has celiac also, and I haven't really found anyone, but they might be out there.

I suggest that you do the classic food storage addage: "Store what you eat and eat what you store." That said, what?

I know there are products that are gf and there are products that are similar that are not.

Beans, beans, and more beans, rice (varieties are a great idea, even for those of us who are not gf), potato flakes and dehydrated potatoes, corn, sorghum, millet, rice noodles.

Many of these grains can be ground to make gf flour blends. I don't know the shelf life of most of the grains, but like wheat, they will stay fresher whole, rather than after they are ground.

If you are not cooking from scratch, I would suggest you start so that you have some idea how to do this.
 

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I wish-My daughter's sister in law has celiac and no gluten/wheat for her and their budget is killing them food wise.
My daughter has celiac also, and I haven't really found anyone, but they might be out there.

I suggest that you do the classic food storage addage: "Store what you eat and eat what you store." That said, what?

I know there are products that are gf and there are products that are similar that are not.

Beans, beans, and more beans, rice (varieties are a great idea, even for those of us who are not gf), potato flakes and dehydrated potatoes, corn, sorghum, millet, rice noodles.

Many of these grains can be ground to make gf flour blends. I don't know the shelf life of most of the grains, but like wheat, they will stay fresher whole, rather than after they are ground.

If you are not cooking from scratch, I would suggest you start so that you have some idea how to do this.
Exactly, you must learn how to cook from scratch. I was a couple of years into storage and my daughter comes up with needing gluten free. I felt just like you. The cost also was prohibitive and the mixes in all honesty did not really taste that good and you had to add a number of ingredients to the mix as well.

Xanthan gum is going to be the most important ingredient to store and plenty of it even if you usually only use 1 tsp per cup of rice,buckwheat, etc flours. It does the binding that gluten does in wheat flours. Baking products; muffins, pancakes, bread, flat bread, pizza crust etc are what you will need to perfect; and as it turns out, it is not hard at all. We grind our own rice now just like the wheat berries. Yes you'll will have to store white rice the most and plan to grind it into flour as needed. Should last 20 years properly sealed. Buckwheat is not a grain and a little added to a pancake recipe makes awesome pancakes. We have a basic blend of 6 c rice flour, 1 cup potato flour, and 1 cup tapioca flour that is our base for all bake goods. Whatever wheat recipe there is you can replace with this mix plus 1 tsp xanthan gum per cup and there you have it. All the rest is cooking from scratch. That is the only way you can store and not break the bank. So in a nutshell store more rice than you expected and xantham gum. Potato and tapioca starch if you wish. Otherwise, it's the same as everyone else only with plain foods not mixes.

We are going to make our own rice egg noodles soon. Piece of cake. Flour, xanthum gum, olive oil and eggs. That's it. Maybe a little salt.

Be of good cheer, it's not hard just different.
 

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The wanderer
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This is VERY useful information! Thanks, Cybergranny!

Where does a person buy Xanthum gum?
 

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Bobs Red Mill has it (Most supermarkets that carry his stuff) health food stores, whole foods I order on line at Bulk Spices Nuts Chocolates and Bulk Candy at Bulkfoods.com. Cheapest I've found.
Yes, cybergranny, xanthum gum. I couldn't think what it was called and I was too tired to get up and walk into the kitchen.

My thing about the darned stuff is that it is not cheap. I need to get some more for my preps. There is another additive, similar to this. I can't remember what it is called.
 

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Survival and Handgun Podcaster
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I was diagnosed with Celiac disease a little over 2 years ago. As many of you know, it's a real PIA to store gluten free foods. Store foods as natural as possible, canning, freeze drying, etc. Yes, beans! If you shop around, you can also find gluten free canned foods. You can also prepare all natural beef jerky and if you do it correctly it will be gluten free, google that.

Glad to see others in the same boat as me.
 

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Gluton Free Flour Mix

3 cups soy flour
3 cups corn starch
2 cups rice flour
1 cup corn flour

use 1 and 1/2 teaspoon of Xanthan or Guar Gum for every cup of mix used in bread.

Buy the different flours in 50 pound bags and mix it, store in freezer as processed grains of any kind do not store well.
we bought from Honeywell and Bobs Red mills.
 

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The wanderer
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Thanks, lotsoflead. That's extemely useful information.
 

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Gluten-free as in what kinds of foods? Wheat-substitutes like gluten-free bread mixes and non-gluten flours? Can the gluten-free foods made by companies such as "Gluten Free Pantry" be vacuum sealed and stored with O2 absorbers in airtight buckets?

What about things like rice, lentils, and beans, they're gluten free. I've never been clear on which other grains are gluten free: Oats? Barley? Corn?

I'm going to assume you mainly mean to replace wheat. That can really be tough because even eating with every-day shopping is tough when you must avoid gluten.
Wheat, rye, barley are the primary sources of gluten, however, in the US most of the oats are contaminated by growing as a rotation crop in wheat fields and/or being processed on much of the same equipment with wheat.

Corn also has trace amounts of gluten, but not enough to bother most Celiacs.

BEWARE of some of the traditional grains (like spelt) that some ill-informed health food store employees may say is gluten free. They often have less gluten than modern wheat, but they are far from being gluten free.

Costco carries this.

Or here is the direct link to Augason Farms website.
Augason Farms is good tasting, but buy from a store please, or be prepared to WAIT AND WAIT AND WAIT, not to mention deal with lousy customer service if you buy direct from them. I've known orders being placed direct to take 4 months to be filled.

My daughter has celiac also, and I haven't really found anyone, but they might be out there.

I suggest that you do the classic food storage addage: "Store what you eat and eat what you store." That said, what?

I know there are products that are gf and there are products that are similar that are not.

Beans, beans, and more beans, rice (varieties are a great idea, even for those of us who are not gf), potato flakes and dehydrated potatoes, corn, sorghum, millet, rice noodles.

Many of these grains can be ground to make gf flour blends. I don't know the shelf life of most of the grains, but like wheat, they will stay fresher whole, rather than after they are ground.

If you are not cooking from scratch, I would suggest you start so that you have some idea how to do this.
I've been dealing with Celiac and food storage for about 40 years now, and BELIEVE ME, it's worlds easier now than it was then!!!

My stored & daily use grains include:
  • quinoa - which also serves as a perfectly balanced source of protein all by itself
  • rice - white non-enriched, brown both short & long grain, wild
  • buckwheat
  • millet
  • corn
  • potato starch
  • tapioca and tapioca flour
  • flax seed
  • sorghum
  • arrowroot flour
  • teff flour
  • chia seed

amaranth is another good, nutritious grain but I'm allergic to it :(

many Celiacs have very sensitive digestive systems and cannot tolerate some of the things you normally think of for storage - like beans (there are very few beans I can eat, but, there are a few)

not all Celiacs can tolerate xanthan gum
not all Celiacs can tolerate guar gum

gelatin can be used as a substitute for gluten in many baked goods

corn starch can be used as a partial substitute for gluten in many baked goods

If you have someone in the household that is gluten intolerant it is far more needful than ever to use what you store on a daily basis - or at least weekly - so you will be aware of whether or not any of the foods you have stored cannot be tolerated by your Celiac.

When in crisis mode is NOT the time to find out that your special dietary needs cannot be met by much of the food you have stored!!!!
 

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Here's a recipe I came up with for nutritious gluten free crepes, if you want to try it or use some of your grains.

GF Crepes

1 ½ cups almond milk
3 eggs
2 Tbsp vegetable oil
¾ tsp vanilla extract

Whiz in blender for a couple of seconds.

Combine in a bowl:
¼ cup sugar
¼ cup tapioca flour
¼ cup potato starch
⅓ cup sorghum flour
2 Tblsp buckwheat flour
1 Tblsp quinoa flour
1 tsp flax seed flour
1 tsp xanthan gum
(optional) 1 tsp cinnamon powder

Mix dry ingredients thoroughly.

Gradually add to liquids in blender, blending briefly after each addition.

Cook in a hot skillet or on a griddle greased with coconut oil until lightly browned on each side.
 
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