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Should work.
There is a town in the Australiwn Outback that uses parabolic dishes to boil water to steam and drive a steam engine generator.
You need good sunlight for that though.
Stirling engines are cool. I have seen a home made one running off LPG that is on an outboard boat motor and drives a 10 foot dinghy at 3 knots.
 

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Anyone who has built one, did you use some instructions off of the internet? I am looking to build a small scale stirling engine that runs off of a candle or whatever heat source. The plans I found had the usage of JB Weld which I find melts rather easily when put to heat so therefore will not work to hold my engine together.
If you want to build a small one just for fun, go to www.airpot.com and obtain one of their free samples of a precision dashpot.
This is a small precision glass cylinder with a graphite piston.
You remove the adjusting screw from the top and you now have an inlet port for the hot air.

The picture is of one I took a photograph of last year at a show. The displacer piston is a piece of styrofoam, the cylinder and piston are an airpot dashpot, and the flywheel is a biscuit tin lid.
It runs on a cup of hot water.
Quite simple to build.
I haven't done one yet, just nevef seem to have time to do it, but I have the dash pot.
 

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Here are a few pics I got of Stirling engines at a show the other day.

Here is a small model built with an Airpot dashpot as a piston


Here is a little one of an unusual design, it fits on your hand and stis there running along at 4000 rpm


And here is an outboard boat motor that pushes a 10 foot dinghy at 3-4 knots


I have videos of them running but not sure how to get them on here.
 

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Get them designed right and they will produce a fair bit of power.
There was one in Sweden in the '70s in a Ford Pinto that put out 115hp...
Little toy size ones need to be almost frictionless to work.
 

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That blue thing you can see in the jar is a styrofoam piston and the stuff wrapped around it is stainless steel mesh to act as a heat exchanger. It is in the inside of the jar and stationary. The styrofoam piston almost touches it and the air it displaces must go through the mesh to move from one end of the jar to the other.
The white cup contains only hot water and the bottom of the jar is sitting in the water.
The piston rod going to the blue piston is sealed around where it runs into the jar, but it must be a low friction seal.
Not sure on what the actual seal is on this engine.

Hope that helps...
 
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