Food storage advice

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by Asatrur, Apr 27, 2011.

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  1. Asatrur

    Asatrur Well-Known Member

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    We did a huge buy up of lots of industrial size veggies, fruits, etc. from a closing store and I am wondering if it would be better to open them and can them using a canner or leave them the way they are?
    Advice?
     
  2. Ezmerelda

    Ezmerelda Well-Known Member

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    I'm guessing you mean those gigantic cans of fruits and veggies?

    Unless you have a very large family, or expect a large influx of people, it might be a good idea to open the cans and separate the contents into more usable portions, to prevent waste.

    I believe Patrice Lewis at Rural Revolution does that with bulk sized ketchup and mustard with good results.

    Just to be safe, I'd use the pressure canner for the re-canning.

    Just my two cents.
     

  3. swede

    swede Member

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    For me, I think I'd keep them as is for now because every time you open a package, you invite bacteria, etc. and threaten spoilage. Also, recooking for re-canning is going to cook out more nutrients.

    The big cans, properly stored will preserve the food for a good long time, as much as ten years.

    I think I would consider leaving it in the big cans for now but make provisions to repack/store/freeze etc. when you open the cans in the future.

    JMHO
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2011
  4. BasecampUSA

    BasecampUSA Sr. Homesteader

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    I agree with swede... we buy a lot of big cans at Restuarant Depot for bulk, case lots and other storage to save money (a LOT cheaper than Sam's etc. - just get a "catering" tax number from you state, whether you have the business or not, tha will get you a buyers card at Restaurant Depot).

    DON'T buy acid foods to store in cans... we have big had disasters with:

    Tomatoes
    Pineapples and pineapple juice
    Other acidic juices
    Sauerkraut (obviously)
    etc. etc.

    If any cans bulge THROW THEM OUT -the botulin will poison and kill you.
     
  5. Ezmerelda

    Ezmerelda Well-Known Member

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    11
    I checked at Patrice's blog, and she agrees with Swede when it comes to fruits and veggies, as far as further loss of nutrients and texture is concerned, but she thinks beans would tolerate re-canning better.

    I believe she said that she's only done re-canning with mustard and ketchup so far, (both high-acid, partially liquefied foods).

    As Swede said, the better strategy might be to plan ahead for the leftovers, and keep the cans intact, to be safe.
     
  6. Centraltn

    Centraltn Well-Known Member

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    Yrs ago I tried recanning some of those great big cans of stuff. All it did was make it last longer but it enhanced the taste of the can they were in. Had to throw em out.
     
  7. Asatrur

    Asatrur Well-Known Member

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    Wow, just finished our inventory and we have a ton o stuff, but now the next challenge is take that list and try and shoehorn it into this list, which are the numbers just about every storage calculator gives us. Ideas on how to do this including food substitutions i.e. 25 lbs of millet would go where?
    Oh, did I tell you how much I love you guys :beercheer:
    WHEAT 150 POUNDS 600
    RICE 50 POUNDS 200
    OTHER GRAINS 100 POUNDS 400
    LEGUMES 60 POUNDS 240
    SHORTENING 4 POUNDS 16
    VEGETABLE OILS / POWDERED BUTTER 2 GALLONS 8
    MAYONNAISE / SALAD DRESSING 3 QUARTS 12
    PEANUT BUTTER 4 POUNDS 16
    WHITE AND BROWN SUGAR 43 POUNDS 172
    OTHER SUGARS 20 POUNDS 80
    MILK 75 POUNDS 300
    VEGGIES 185 POUNDS 740
    FRUIT 185 POUNDS 740
    BAKING POWDER 1 POUNDS 4
    BAKING SODA 1 POUNDS 4
    YEAST 0.5 POUNDS 2
    SALT 5 POUNDS 20
    VINEGAR 0.5 GALLONS 2