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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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NIA projects that at the average U.S. grocery store it will soon cost $11.43 for one ear of corn, $23.05 for a 24 oz loaf of wheat bread, $62.21 for a 32 oz package of Domino Granulated Sugar, $24.31 for a 32 fl oz container of soy milk, $77.71 for a 11.30 oz container of Folgers Classic Roast Coffee, $45.71 for a 64 fl oz container of Minute Maid Orange Juice, and $15.50 for a Hershey's Milk Chocolate 1.55 oz candy bar. NIA also projects that by the end of this decade, a plain white men's cotton t-shirt at Wal-Mart will cost $55.57. :eek::eek::eek:

You can read the rest here: National Inflation Association

At those prices I would have to work 3 hours just to buy a loaf of bread!:gaah::gaah:
 

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this is why we prep, people! protect yourself by stocking foods that you can't grow yourself and by learning skills like bread making and canning.
 

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IT WILL NEVER HAPPEN. REMEMBER, LONG BEFORE THEN THE GOVERNMENT WILL GET INVOLVED, SO YOU SHOULD PROBABLY DOUBLE THE PRICES LISTED ABOVE. :mad::mad::mad:
 

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I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...
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this is why we prep, people! protect yourself by stocking foods that you can't grow yourself and by learning skills like bread making and canning.
You have that right!

I just wish we lived somewhere that we could grow most of what we eat, but we just can't do it right now. So, I will keep buying as much of the basics as I can. Hopefully, I can get in a good supply before SHTF. Although if gas prices are any indication, it may happen sooner then I think. Gas jumped 17 cents per gallon in 4 days.:eek:
 

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We went to the wholesale club last night. 25# bag of sugar; $16.82. Back in strawberry season, May, it was $11.99. Freeze dried coffee; $10.24. In August it was $8.65. Yep, it's starting. :(
 

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In spite of high joblessness and wages staying flat, the price customers pay for goods increased by 1.8 percent during 2012, according to the labor Department. While that is not a massive amount, it affects the price of staples we buy each day and builds up. Below is a survey of some of those items.
 

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Just walking at the edge of my grave
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Another thread has rose from the depths! :)
I must say I expected food prices to rise more than they have so far. We will have to see what the future holds when it gets here.
 

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At 1.8% food will double in about 38.8 years. The third set of numbers is the price index. So in 1999 it cost 74.2% more to buy a loaf of bread then in 1980. Divide that by 20 and you get 3.71%. or a doubling every 18.87 years. But of course it wasn't a constant 3.71%. So 19 years latter its 74.2 not 100%.

1980 $0.51 100.0
1981 $0.53 103.2
1982 $0.53 104.6
1983 $0.54 106.5
1984 $0.54 106.4
1985 $0.55 108.7
1986 $0.56 111.0
1987 $0.55 107.6
1988 $0.61 120.5
1989 $0.67 130.8
1990 $0.69 136.5
1991 $0.71 139.5
1992 $0.75 147.4
1993 $0.75 147.8
1994 $0.76 149.5
1995 $0.79 155.5
1996 $0.88 172.1
1997 $0.87 171.4
1998 $0.86 169.1
1999 $0.89 174.2
Source http://qrc.depaul.edu/djabon/cpi.htm

I got this from the USDA source http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-price-outlook/summary-findings.aspx

Based on current conditions, ERS's inflation forecast for both all food and food-at-home (grocery store) prices in 2013 is for increases of 2.5 to 3.5 percent. This forecast means that prices are likely to increase more than in 2012, but that overall inflation is expected to be near the historical average for both indexes. Inflation is expected to remain strong, especially in the first half of 2013, for most animal-based food products due to higher feed prices. For most food categories not directly affected by the 2012 drought, however, inflation is expected to be at or even below normal levels.

I think they may be telling the truth here. But if that is so then at 3.5% food will double (70/3.5%) every 20 years. Yep Just Like I said. Of course as prepers we know it will increase as fuel demand increases but just going with the assumed 3.5% then by 2033 Cheeseburgers and fries for the family will be in my area around $8 for meet, $4 for buns, $8 for cheese, $6 for fries, (supermarket prices mind you not eating out) so about $26 for 4 people for cheese burgers and fries. I know some of you are paying a heck of a lot more then me already. Something to think about?

But of course like I said a lot of factors play in, here the beef on beef LOL source http://cnsnews.com/news/article/price-ground-beef-hits-record-high

In January 1984, the first month BLS tracked the price off 100% ground beef, the price was $1.29 per pound. Had that price merely tracked the rate of overall inflation, according to the BLS inflation calculator, it would have risen to $2.66 per pound by 2009, when President Obama took office. However, between 1984 and 2009, the average price for a pound of 100% ground beef did not increase as much as overall inflation. Thus, in January 2009, when Obama was inaugurated it was only $2.357.

Since January 2009, the average price for a pound of 100% ground beef would have risen to only $2.52 per pound--if it had tracked the overall rate of inflation. However, the price of 100% ground beef has outpaced overall inflation in the past three and a half years--hitting July's record price of approximately $3.09.

The average price for a pound of 100% ground chuck hit a record $3.449 in July--up from $1.821 in January 1980.xls (when BLS started tracking it) and $2.961 in January 2009, when Obama took office. Between January 1980 and January 2009, the price of ground chuck grew at a slower pace than overall inflation. Had it kept pace with overall inflation during that period it would have been $4.74 in January 2009 instead of just $2.961.

Since January 2009, the price of ground chuck has outpaced overall inflation. Had it tracked overall inflation, it would be $3.16 per pound now instead of approximately $3.45


So honestly I think their prices may be a bit high but we will see
 

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A Round American Woman
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My Mother's budget for groceries for her, my teen brother and me (age 10-ish) around 1980'ish was................ $10.

For a whole week.
 

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At 1.8% food will double in about 38.8 years. The third set of numbers is the price index. So in 1999 it cost 74.2% more to buy a loaf of bread then in 1980. Divide that by 20 and you get 3.71%. or a doubling every 18.87 years. But of course it wasn't a constant 3.71%. So 19 years latter its 74.2 not 100%.

Based on current conditions, ERS's inflation forecast for both all food and food-at-home (grocery store) prices in 2013 is for increases of 2.5 to 3.5 percent. This forecast means that prices are likely to increase more than in 2012, but that overall inflation is expected to be near the historical average for both indexes. Inflation is expected to remain strong, especially in the first half of 2013, for most animal-based food products due to higher feed prices. For most food categories not directly affected by the 2012 drought, however, inflation is expected to be at or even below normal levels.
I don't believe those numbers. The government has been under-reporting inflation numbers since 1996. Real inflation is about 10%. Food inflation is even higher due to the declining value of the dollar and also because growing conditions around the world are getting worse.

This is interesting:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidma...ex-shows-official-cpi-underreports-inflation/

Big Mac Index Shows Official CPI Underreports Inflation

In "Better to Bank with Cyprus Than the United States?" we wrote:

In 1996 the government began measuring inflation differently, lowering the reported number significantly. … The average Big Mac costs 83.5% more.

Even though the cost of a Big Mac has risen from $2.36 to $4.33, the CPI index has only adjusted to pay $3.49 for a Big Mac leaving seniors $0.84 shy of smiling.

Put another way the lack of an adequate CPI adjustments leave seniors 71 days shy of a year's worth of lovin' it. Seniors really deserve a break today.
 

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My Mother's budget for groceries for her, my teen brother and me (age 10-ish) around 1980'ish was................ $10.

For a whole week.
Roslyn, in 1975 I got my first apartment with 2 roommates. We each put in $10.00 a week for groceries. We shopped that ads and cooked everything from scratch. After a few weeks, we realized that we had lots of money in the grocery wallet, so we began stocking a liquor cabinet. We soon had a very well stocked liquor cabinet. Then we began using the money to purchase curtains and other stuff for the apartment.
 

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Whether inflation is 2% or 10% either is more than my bank pays me in interest.
 

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I like this statement...


"Since January 2009, the average price for a pound of 100% ground beef would have risen to only $2.52 per pound--if it had tracked the overall rate of inflation. However, the price of 100% ground beef has outpaced overall inflation in the past three and a half years--hitting July's record price of approximately $3.09."

It's $4.00 a pound here in Atlanta... Would love to see $3.09...
 

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Don't forget too that a bag of sugar use to weigh 5lb.s,now its only 4lb.s yet its much higher. Also notice how a can of vegetables are never full anymore, only about half full of food and the rest is water.

In 1968 I think we spent about 35 a wk. on grocery and that was lots of meat. Now we eat very little meat.

It has been a 'I don't give a damn month and it has rained even longer almost everyday, so our garden looks like a jungle and most of the crops died. So we had to buy everything in case this Zimmerman thing goes crazy down here and we can't get to a store safely.
 

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```Also notice how a can of vegetables are never full anymore, only about half full of food and the rest is water.```

I mentioned that on another site a few weeks ago. I know years ago I had leftovers with my dinners when using canned goods.
Now, I barely can feed two with one can.
I wish I had the cans from the 70s to compare, but don't.
The can had to have been larger, ya think??
 

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JayJay said:
```Also notice how a can of vegetables are never full anymore, only about half full of food and the rest is water.```

I mentioned that on another site a few weeks ago. I know years ago I had leftovers with my dinners when using canned goods.
Now, I barely can feed two with one can.
I wish I had the cans from the 70s to compare, but don't.
The can had to have been larger, ya think??
Marketing tactics used by companies to make you think prices aren't changing as much as they are. Turn a jar of peanut butter over and you see the jar has a 'dip' in the center that is getting bigger so you don't notice you're getting less product. Narrow as all get out cereal boxes that are too tall to fit in many cabinets. Many times 'new and improved' on the box is just that - a new and improved package that makes you think you get the same amount of food as the original package.
**Anyone looking to really save money at the grocery store should look at buying less processed food and more basic items. It is super easy to make freeze ahead slow cooker meals, your own mixes for sauces and baking, etc. Couponing used to be a good way to save a few bucks (still is for some items) but I have a hard time finding coupons for products we actually use. One of the moms I exchange coupons with was mentioning the same thing the other day, slim pickings from coupon circulars. And yes, as many have already stated, the basics are increasing in price and standard packages for them is getting smaller in grocery stores.
 

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In 1996 the government began measuring inflation differently, lowering the reported number significantly. … The average Big Mac costs 83.5% more.

Even though the cost of a Big Mac has risen from $2.36 to $4.33, the CPI index has only adjusted to pay $3.49 for a Big Mac leaving seniors $0.84 shy of smiling.


In 1972 I could buy a big mac, fries, and chocolate shake for $1.05, gas for the car 24.9 cents a gallon. My salary than, 10 dollars an hour, and since it involved driving, a car and gas card. Today after good jobs are gone, 13 dollars an hour, 4 to 12.30pm shift, and 64 mile round trip to/from work no free car or gas card...just sayin :mad:
 

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In 1996 the government began measuring inflation differently, lowering the reported number significantly. … The average Big Mac costs 83.5% more.

Even though the cost of a Big Mac has risen from $2.36 to $4.33, the CPI index has only adjusted to pay $3.49 for a Big Mac leaving seniors $0.84 shy of smiling.

In 1972 I could buy a big mac, fries, and chocolate shake for $1.05, gas for the car 24.9 cents a gallon. My salary than, 10 dollars an hour, and since it involved driving, a car and gas card. Today after good jobs are gone, 13 dollars an hour, 4 to 12.30pm shift, and 64 mile round trip to/from work no free car or gas card...just sayin :mad:
I remember mac d's hamburgers being 15 cents. the fries for a large size in 72 were 3 1/2 oz. I use to work for them. somethings have grown in size, lol
 
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