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Retired Army
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I have brought guests to the Spokane LDS Cannery and they have also allowed me to book group canning sessions with the public. If there are dates open they are happy to use them up.

Last week I canned 36 #10 cans

12 Red Wheat
12 Potatoes
12 Pinto Beans

all filled to the top, not partial cans like the commercial stuff.

30 year shelf life on all.

Cost me $88 and less than an hour's time. Prices do fluctuate, but they are cost, not marked up.

Happy to take anyone in the Spokane area, I can once a month. IM if interested.
 

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The wife and I just looked at this thread. She wants to know how bad the learning curve is with getting hard white wheat compared to using store bought flower. She also wants to know about the red wheat and what people use it for and stuff.
 

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Here's a link to types of wheat and it's uses.

Types Of Wheat

We just cut our small patch of hard red winter wheat. This is the first year we tried it. Looks like we'll get about 200# of grain out of it, although I'm cleaning it by hand and I'm only about halfway through it, so it could be a little less. 100# will be stored for making flour as we need it. 50# will go back in the ground in Sept, and whatever is left will be given to a friend who wants to try it.
It is certainly easier to buy flour rather than wheat, but wheat will last far longer in storage. You can pack a 5 gal food grade bucket with about 30# of wheat, add an oxygen absorber, seal it, and it will stay good for years. Keep in mind - you need a way to grind it into flour. We don't even have a grain mill yet ( although it's at the very top of our "must have" list ) so we are going to try to put some in the food processor and see what happens. I have my doubts though. :rolleyes:
 

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performing monkey
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We don't even have a grain mill yet ( although it's at the very top of our "must have" list ) so we are going to try to put some in the food processor and see what happens. I have my doubts though. :rolleyes:
what about a 'juicer' the holes in the blades are VERY fine... I have NO IDEA if it would work, just asking...
 

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I don't think a juicer would work for a variety of reasons. The only juicer that might work would be a "masticator" like the Champion juicer. Even then you'll get a wet meal instead of a dry grind. Probably bring all the oils out? Who knows...

 

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Looks more like a ray gun from a 1950's "B" rated Sci-Fi movie. :rolleyes: I think I'll find a way to grind it instead of cooking it with a laser beam. :)
 

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performing monkey
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I don't think a juicer would work for a variety of reasons. The only juicer that might work would be a "masticator" like the Champion juicer. Even then you'll get a wet meal instead of a dry grind. Probably bring all the oils out? Who knows...
ok, thanx for answering

but where do the oils go in a grinder? a reservoir?
are they in significant amounts in wheat to be used as a cooking product or for any other uses?
 

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I think there'd be just enough to make it messy. Not enough to cook with. I have a Champion Juicer. The food goes in the top and you push it down into the chamber where a rotating set of comb blades "masticates" (same process as chewing your food) the food. The ground up wet solids come out the front. The liquids - mostly water - drip out of the area under the grind chamber through a mesh.

It seems that the water content of the food escapes through the mesh. Foods with oils tend to retain the oil in the more solid stuff that comes out the front of the machine.

I'm sure the wheat would be cookable and edible but would not resemble traditional flour at all. It's be a wet kind of paste.
 
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