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RockyMountainCanadian
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
most of south central Alberta is either experiencing floods or at least high water, this is not a very common occurrence here, at least before 2005 it wasn't. for people in low lying areas it is a shtf. transportation is going to be effected and may open some eyes.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/alberta-flood-in-pictures/article12720894/
The main thing that many haven't even looked at is the 2 routes to BC and the ports are either closer or close to it. :coffee:
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If they didn't learn in 2005 ...........:brickwall:
*I just plugged my under the basement slab pump in, and we are on a ridge at about 4200 feet.
 

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The information being told on the radio is that the water is flowing at three times the speed of the 2005 flood :eyebulge:

Some pictures.
 

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At least some folks are finding ways of making lemonade from the lemons visited upon them.


As any experienced whitewater kayaker will tell you, you don't want to be on a flooding river because the danger from debris in the river is quite high. High water levels are fine, and fun, but when the high water is accompanied by debris then you're asking for trouble.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The kayaker is a real idiot, that water is full of debris like parts of houses from upstream, anything for 15 minutes of fame.
 

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I can't believe that guy was doing that!!!!

That is heading straight to the weir, which is a "choke point" in Calgary that kills 99% of boaters who do not portage around it ...
I can't speak from experience about that river or weir, but I can tell you that the 99% fatality rate for boaters getting caught in weirs captures everyone, no matter how little experience they have, who happens to be in a boat or on an air mattress or on an inner tube or in some inflatable kayak.

There certainly are weirs which are widowmakers even for very experienced whitewater kayakers - is that one of them or is it just a weir which kills inexperienced boaters/floaters? I've been sucked into the maws of many weir like features on rivers and if you know what you're doing, they're fun. But again, not during a flood.

Two guys having fun at a weir.


 

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The crazy thing to me is that this is being spun as the epitome of a great government response. I agree that Calgary's mayor and others have done well, and plans were in place, BUT they spent all kinds of money on upstream sensors, just did a big review etc and how much warning did many places get, Nada.

All the emergency workers are doing a great job I am sure, working hard, but Danielle Smith (opposition leader) was RESCUED IN A MANURE SPREADER!:eek: Without people taking action on their own and working together when needed this would have gone much worse so far.



100 000 people evacuated.
I see someone started a wiki already http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_Alberta_floods

Stay safe anyone in the area.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This storm / flood was a surprize to about every body, the storm center stalled over the area and kept looking like it was over, this wasn't from just mountain run off it was for lack of a better description a perfect storm. But you are absolutely right the people helped people. did you notice what many of those rescued were wearing?? nothing like shorts and sandals for a flood, it was kind of cool today, I have my longjohns on. I don't know where the news channels are getting their measurements from, We had 4 inchs from Wednesday noon to Thursday night and at least 5.5 since (7:30 Friday)
that is a crap load of rain to put on already wet ground.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Storm/ flood update

The sky has mostly cleared up, I saw tomorrows super moon at 04:00 this morning when My son woke me up for my shift dumping the wet vac to keep the basement floor from being inundated (the pump isn't quite big enough)
The clean up in the low lying areas will be a massive effort.
 

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Today's update on the flooding

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/elderly-woman-drowned-in-calgary-flood-police-say-1.1342233

Calgary police have confirmed that an elderly woman drowned at her home in the evacuation zone during last week's flooding.

An autopsy revealed the cause of death was accidental drowning, police said. The 83-year-old woman's body was found in a ground-level apartment near the Elbow River.

The woman was informed of the evacuation order and police believe she intended to obey it. Her name will not be released.

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi said the woman's death was a "tragedy" and offered condolences to her family and friends.

Three other people also died in the floods near High River, Alta. The community of 13,000 people south of Calgary was one of the hardest hit by the disaster and much of it remains without basic services.

Officials said it could be days or weeks before the residents of High River are allowed to return to their homes, but they are close to announcing a re-entry timeline.

About 300 people ignored the town's evacuation orders, drawing the ire of municipal and provincial authorities. Meanwhile, some frustrated evacuees are demanding access to their homes so they can assess the damage.

"I can't tell you how badly I want to have everybody back in High River," Mayor Emile Blokland said. "But we have to make sure the community is safe before we let them return to the town."

Some have threatened to go to court in an attempt to force the authorities to let them back in, but Blokland said he's not paying attention to that.

The situation is also dire in the Siksika First Nation, east of Calgary, which remains under a state of emergency.

"We're still in emergency response mode," Chief Fred Rabbit Carrier told CTV's Canada AM Wednesday.

He said he hasn't even been able to properly assess the damage in the community. Providing non-perishable food and potable water for evacuees and residents remains a challenge, he said.

About 1,000 of Siksika's 6,000 people have been forced out of their homes. It's estimated that the flood damaged about 250 houses, and some of them will likely not be saved.

Rabbit Carrier said there has been an outpouring of support from nearby communities and those who've made donations to a flood-relief bank account.

Alberta's Aboriginal Relations Minister Robin Campbell has already toured Siksika First Nation and National Chief for the Assembly of First Nations Shawn Atleo is also expected to visit, Rabbit Carrier said.

Flood cleanup continues across southern Alberta and efforts are underway to mobilize Calgary's downtown core.

Although Calgary is making good progress, opening up 80 per cent of the roads to the public and allowing most residents to return home, the local state of emergency will be extended for another seven days, Fire Chief Bruce Burrell said Wednesday.

That gives the city powers to use all available resources and speed up the recovery process, he said.

Burrell also said that nearly 11,000 residences and businesses - most of them in the downtown core - remain without power. Enmax utilities is working to restore most of the power grid this week.

Calgary has opened a number of service centres where residents can seek help with flood-related issues.

Nenshi said many residents are simply heading over to their neighbours' and friends' homes and offering to help with the cleanup.

"People are just helping people…It's really remarkable," he said.

The provincial government has pledged $1 billion in funding to start the first phase of flood recovery. Ottawa has yet to announce how much money the federal government will give.

Initialestimates peg the flooding damage between $3 billion and $5 billion, but that figure could rise.
 

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http://www.theprovince.com/cars/Hundreds+vehicles+lost+Calgary+floods/8587209/story.html

Hundreds of new vehicles lost to Calgary floods

Calgary Alberta auto dealers were not immune to the devastating impact of flooding.

Yet the message from Calgary Motor Dealers' Association executive manager Jim Gillespie is it could have been much worse.

Dealerships within or around the Calgary Auto Mall were the hardest hit. Combined, about 240 vehicles from dealerships such as Lone Star Mercedes Benz, Precision Hyundai, Maclin Ford and Calgary BMW were lost from a storage site north of Glenmore at a Burnco facility.

About 300 vehicles were saved, however. "It could have been much more," says Gillespie. "Many of the dealerships were able to get hundreds of cars out before the flooding took place.

"Overall, the number of vehicles lost represents less than one per cent of the 10,000 new vehicles available at Calgary dealerships."

While many of the dealerships around the Calgary Auto Mall, and downtown, were closed on Friday and Saturday, it was because they had no power, not because of flooding to the actual facilities, notes Gillespie.

In the meantime, the Motor Dealers' Association of Alberta has put a call out to its members, on behalf of the CMDA, for donations toward Red Cross for Alberta flood relief.

Donations can be made by calling Red Cross at 1-800-418-1111 or visiting redcross.ca/donate/ donate-online-donate-to-the-alberta-floods.

On a positive note: Olds College auction raises $1.2M

Flood waters couldn't dampen the success of the J.C. (Jack) Anderson Charity Auto Auction in Olds this past weekend.

More than 3,500 people attended Saturday and Sunday, with the auction of more than 100 vehicles raising more than $1.2 million for the Olds College Centennial Entrepreneurship Legacy Fund.
 

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Issues that I didn't think about

http://www.calgaryherald.com/busine...y+legal+waters+after+flood/8595047/story.html

Calgary home buyers, sellers in muddy legal waters after flood

For people buying or selling a home, having the property flood in the midst of a transaction can create a whole new set of headaches.

Who's responsible for the cleanup? Whose insurance to use? What happens on the date of possession?

The Calgary Real Estate Board is urging people in the midst of residential real estate transactions to consult their lawyers to find out the impact of the devastating floods that hit the city.

"Those who have closings or sales that were affected by the flooding in Calgary and surrounding areas should call their lawyers as soon as possible for guidance. All questions must be referred for a legal opinion and addressed on a case-by-case basis," said the board on its website.

"Lou Pesta, senior associate at Walsh LLP, recommends that all parties attempt to resolve the situations fairly. He also advised that for houses which are affected, no keys should be exchanged until the emergency has subsided and any legal issues have been resolved."

Jeff Kahane, a Calgary lawyer specializing in real estate, said the situation right now is a mess and a complicated one with a number of different issues, which are very situ-ationally dependent.

"It's the biggest week for real estate of the year, in a year that has been exceptionally busy in general, and then you throw in all the flood issues, it's just been nuts," Kahane said.

"It's a mess." In a blog on his website, Mike Fotiou, associate broker with First Place Realty, said there are more than 550 homes now listed on MLS in the flood-affected areas, the majority of them being condos.

The affected communities are home to more than one in five condos now listed in the city.

"Over 200 homes were sold in those communities in the past 30 days. As to buyers who recently closed on homes heavily affected in those areas, each of their cases will need to be addressed on an individual

basis as many properties are no longer in 'substantially the same condition' as outlined in the purchase contract," he wrote.

In a blog on its website, the Real Estate Council of Alberta said it has already received calls from industry professionals about what will happen to transactions that were underway.

"What should industry professionals do if the flood has destroyed their brokerage office, their contracts and other paperwork? What is to be done for a consumer who has sold his or her home and purchased a new one, when the new home has been damaged by flood waters? What about a seller brokerage agreement for a seller whose current home is no longer saleable because of extensive damage?" it said.

"Brokerages and offices that have suffered flood damage and may have lost their records should, to the best of their ability, start recreating transaction records using copies of contracts obtained through lawyers, lenders and the consumers themselves. Call the real estate lawyers involved, call the mortgage broker, call the lender and call the local bank, if possible. ..."

The Real Estate Council of Alberta said industry professionals should also reach out to their clients, both buyers and sellers, who are currently involved in transactions in areas affected by flooding to find out how clients wish to proceed.

"Once you are clear on how the consumers want to proceed, a determination has to be made as to whether that course of action is legal. If all parties to a transaction do not agree on a course of action, recommend to your clients that they seek legal advice from a lawyer familiar with handling such disputes," the association said.
 

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RockyMountainCanadian
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
How much of the high river clown show is political ?? it is in the leader of the opposition's riding and it seems to be the only place that this crap is going on, Bragg Creek residents were back at their homes as soon as the water receded. This will bear watching,
 

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Some people are being allowed back into Highriver today.
Hearing they shelved a report of flood planning for 6 years is going to rankle a few feathers.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/recommendations-from-2005-alberta-flood-still-relevant-today/article12771618/
http://globalnews.ca/news/668154/alberta-government-failed-to-act-on-flood-prevention-report/

This picture shows that the government may be there to help, barely, but they sure don't have some grand scheme, they were making do with what they had, just like "ordinary" citizens.
 

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I keep thinkin' that the flood-plain of HighRiver should be turned into some kind of park, the high-ground of HighRiver (like where the hospital resides) should continue to be the area of the "town".

That river is too unpredicable to allow the houses to be right-there ... like on "RiverSide Green" ... the residential-road that parallels the river on the west-side ..
 

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http://www.calgaryherald.com/busine...+River+evacuees+with+video/8600660/story.html

CALGARY - As more High River residents prepare to return home Monday, the city announced Sunday a site is being set up in southeast Calgary for evacuees needing temporary housing while their flood-ravaged town undergoes recovery and reconstruction.

The City of Calgary was asked by the province to provide land with access to water, sewer and electricity for up to 1,000 High River residents.

"We're opening our city and our arms to displaced residents," Mayor Naheed Nenshi told reporters Sunday night.

Construction of the site started Saturday in southeast Calgary's Great Plains industrial area, and it will be done over the next two weeks.

The temporary accommodation facility in Calgary will also be open to evacuees from Kananaskis, Canmore, and even Calgary, who were displaced by floods, said Shane Schreiber, director of the High River task force, which is helping residents get back in their homes.

The University of Lethbridge is also temporarily housing some High River residents, and another site near the Cargill meat packing plant is being considered, Schreiber added.

He said the goal of these facilities is to get people out of evacuation centres in the area, including in Nanton and Blackie.

"We'd like to move people off the cots in those evacuation centres and into better, more comfortable housing," he said.

Nenshi, meanwhile, said the city also plans to help the Siksika Nation, located about 80 kilometres east of Calgary along the Bow River. Upwards of 250 houses have been damaged there, displacing at least 800 people.

However, Bruce Burrell, head of the Calgary Emergency Management Agency, said there are no immediate plans to build such sites for Calgarians as the city is still trying to get a better count of how many citizens will require temporary housing. He wants those numbers narrowed down before going to the province for assistance.

"It's no good for us to go to the province and say, 'You need to help us find housing for 2,000 people,' if we're only going to use 40 of them."

Rooms at some Calgary universities and colleges are still available for short-term accommodations, Burrell said, adding there are also spaces for temporary lodging for a period up to a few weeks.

Premier Alison Redford released a video Monday thanking Canadians for the donations, volunteer hours, and well-wishes that have come from coast to coast in the aftermath of Alberta's floods.

"It's a shame when these things happen, and we know they happen in other parts of the country as well," Redford said. "But I will tell you on this Canada Day, we are so grateful to be part of a Canadian community. On behalf of of Alberta, thank you so much from the bottom of our hearts."

Calgary, High River and other neighbouring communities are in the midst of mopping up and assessing losses after the historic flood washed through southern Alberta last week, killing at least four people and wreaking millions - possibly billions - of dollars in damage.

Sunday marked the first day residents of Calgary and Canmore were able to access pre-loaded debit cards from the province, which are intended to help evacuees deal with immediate expenses.

Hundreds of displaced Calgarians stood in long lines in the hot sun to receive the cards. To qualify for one, flood victims must have received an evacuation order and must have been out of their homes for at least seven days.

Human Services Minister Dave Hancock declined to guess how many cards might be handed out in Calgary, saying only that the government is "prepared to meet the demand."

In the first three days the debit cards were handed out, about 4,100 payments totalling $10.25 million supported about 10,250 people, the province said.

Meanwhile, more than 50 assessment teams have been deployed to Calgary to review properties in the city, Burrell said. Those members will be checking on the state and rate of reconstruction for damaged buildings, and how many tenants or residents will need to find temporary homes.

"What we need the count of is the people who can't relocate because they have no support. Once we have that count, we'll probably be having some discussions with the province about what the province will do to assist the city of Calgary in providing temporary accommodation for those people," Burrell said.

Some buildings in the downtown area will have to have their electrical systems - including boiler systems, heating ventilation and air conditioning - redesigned and rebuilt after sustaining significant damage by turbid water full of silt and contaminants, Burrell said.

"We're getting initial assessment reports for some buildings as long as six to eight months for recovery," he said, adding that includes both residential and commercial properties.

While power has been restored to the whole downtown grid, crews are having problems putting buildings back onto the grid due to the significant water and silt damage, he said.

"It means all of that equipment is going to have to be replaced. It can't be easily cleaned."

If assessments determine a building must be demolished, tenants and residents will be allowed to safely re-enter the buildings to retrieve as many belongings as possible before the building is torn down. Already, more than 120 buildings have been flagged for possible demolition.

Nenshi did, however, offer some positive news during his evening news briefing. The mayor said he's "very, very hopeful" and "reasonably confident" all CTrain lines will be reopened in time for the Stampede parade on July 5. Sections of the south rail line, particularly between the City Hall and Heritage stations, were heavily warped by flood water.

"They're working hard," Nenshi said.

Currently, Calgary and 10 other communities remain under local states of emergency, down from 18 on Thursday. The Town of High River is under a provincial state of emergency, meaning the province has assumed responsibility for emergency operations, programs and town services.

Burrell said Calgary's state of emergency expires Wednesday but could be lifted a little earlier.

"The main reason for keeping it in place currently is because some of the powers we have that allow us to purchase things more rapidly, get our hands on goods, make deals that normally we have to get approvals for," he said.

"So there's a benefit to staying in a local state of emergency. But there's also a point where you want to be careful you're not abusing the powers because it will be much more difficult to get it again in the future if you want to use them."


Burrell also announced the ban on outdoor water usage was lifted as of midnight on Sunday, though he reminded citizens to continue to limit their water usage. Boating restrictions on the Bow and Elbow rivers, however, remain in effect. Citizens are encouraged to stay off and away from the riverbanks.

In addition, Burrell urged people not to dump mud and slurry into river systems as the waste material can contain contaminants. Those materials can be dumped at two emergency dumping facilities: one at Spring Gardens, at 1025 32nd Ave. N.E., and the other in Highfield-Bonnybrook, at 1442 46th Ave. S.E.

While it's been a tense week for Calgarians mopping up after the flood crisis, Canada Day celebrations will go on. Mayor Nenshi said he didn't want to disappoint the many people, especially children, who look forward to the festivities each year.

"Although the event has been scaled down, I believe it will act as a huge example of our resiliency and celebrate our spirit of volunteerism."

For those heading out of town over the long weekend, motorists are reminded that nine provincial highways remain closed and two have restricted access. Four lanes are now open on the TransCanada Highway entering Canmore, though the roadway is reduced to one lane in each direction when crews are working in the area.

Highway 1A east and west of Exshaw is still closed, except to emergency vehicles and residents heading from Exshaw to Canmore. And Highway 40 is open from Highway 1 to Highway 68, though campgrounds and hotels in the area are not yet ready to take customers.

With files from Erika Stark, Amanda Stephenson, Bryan Weismiller and David Fraser, Calgary Herald.
 

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story...iver-guns-complaint-commissioner-paulson.html

RCMP seizure of High River guns sparks probe

The head of the commission for public complaints against the RCMP says a probe has been launched after Mounties seized guns from evacuated homes in the aftermath of flooding in High River, Alta.

Ian McPhail, the interim chair of the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP, announced the "public interest" probe on Friday.

"Given the concerns expressed by some members of the public and the ensuing media coverage of RCMP actions in High River, the commission will examine whether the members' actions complied with all appropriate policies, procedures, guidelines and statutory requirements," the independent agency said in a release.

RCMP said they went door-to-door in sections of High River that had been evacuated due to the catastrophic flooding that hit southern Alberta in late June. Police said they were searching for victims of the flooding, but they also took firearms they said had been left in homes.

RCMP officials said at the time that hundreds of weapons that had been left out in plain view and not secure had been taken to the High River detachment.

"It's no different than Slave Lake, to seize firearms or to secure firearms that are in plain view," RCMP Insp. Garrett Woolsey, said on June 28, referring to the Alberta community swept by fire in 2011.

The police action prompted a demand from the Prime Minister's Office that the RCMP give the firearms back to their owners as soon as possible.

A gun owners' group, the Canadian Shooting Sports Association, was sharply critical of the RCMP's actions, calling it proof of a "not-so-hidden agenda" to take guns away from responsible gun owners.

The RCMP said on June 29 that they had begun returning the firearms to High River residents as they were allowed back into their homes.

Earlier in the day, RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson requested that McPhail consider a "chair-initiated complaint." That, Paulson wrote, would allow the complaints commission to investigate RCMP actions in High River, "to assess if they were well founded, reasonably executed and in accordance with our policies."

In his Friday letter, Paulson said he is proud of the RCMP's community response to the terrible flooding in High River.

"I am quite concerned by the sharp criticism that has arisen in the media with respect to the gun seizures from evacuated homes," Paulson wrote.

"Naturally this is quite troubling to me, and I am sure to you, as indeed it must be to many Canadians, who wonder what was going on in High River."

Paulson said he is committed to co-operating with investigators.
 
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