Flintlock Firearms...Advice?

Discussion in 'Hunting & Fishing' started by FreeNihilist, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. FreeNihilist

    FreeNihilist Well-Known Member

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    Does any here have experience with flintlock rifles (or pistols) and have any advice on the pros and cons of flintlocks and would you consider them to be a viable long term gun more so than other guns, provided I would be casting bullets, making wadding and black powder on my own.

    I am looking to possibly purchase a flintlock rifle in the next 2 weeks or so. I currently try to live as basic as possible and make as many goods as possible ( which is most of my needs actually). My goal for buying a flintlock would be to become more self sufficient in yet another aspect. Making BP, wadding and casting lead is all familiar to me but I would be a total newbie to flintlocks.
     
  2. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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  3. FreeNihilist

    FreeNihilist Well-Known Member

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  4. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    Yep,they are harder to shoot then a percussion because of the big flash by your face and eye.. plus there is the delay between the actual flash and the KA Boom.. which allows time to flinch at the flash in the pan...

    As a project it's a fun thing, as a shtf weapon for survival it is leaving you a bit under gunned.. I would prefer a 22 LR as my meat and whatever gun...less noise, less hassle, and quicker to reload is you need to.. a Ruger 10-22 is my choice... plus !! 22ammo is lots lighter then lead balls..

    I know that's more then you asked for but sometimes that's how it is...
     
  5. cranky1

    cranky1 Member

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    a properly tuned flintlock has no lag time. but , boy ,,it is a big learning curve to keep one tuned. every time you fire it, the flint changes shape. if you had to really had to relie on it you would have to knap the flint every time you fired it. if your flint is really tuned good to the frizzen, i think you will only be good for about 3 shots max for reliability. if it is tuned good, the flash in the pan will not be even noticed. you have to give these old boys that used them a big A for effort. do they work , yes, but with a lot of practice. personally i like them. would i take on a grizz with one, only if i had to. have fun .
     
  6. TheAnt

    TheAnt Aesops Ant (not Aunt)

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    Funny you should mention this. I have been working on some artwork for a tee shirt that will have a Kentucky Longrifle on it.

    I have done a bit of reading on these things and they are really awesome implements of war... at least in their day. There are reports of folks being taken out at half a mile with these things (though they are supposedly accurate to about 300 yards by an expert). I would love to have one but I would hate to rely on one especially for self defense these days. They are beautiful works of art and I am trying to capture that in a way that can be easily printed on a tee:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Concretin

    Concretin Member

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    I have an 1803 Harpers Ferry reproduction by Euroarms that I got used. I spent a couple of hundred bucks getting it tuned so that it will go off as fast as a percussion gun. It's fun and will work as a hunting gun, but there are more accoutrements that go with a flinter than any other smoke pole.
     
  8. PopPop

    PopPop Well-Known Member

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    If you have a modern firearm, it is probably more cost effective to aquire ammo. Modern smokeless powder allows properly stored ammo to be viable for decades.
     
  9. md1911

    md1911 Member

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    I would love to hunt with a flintlock. Even if its not a highdollar firearm. The good thing about a flintlock in a shtf scenario for me is I know how to make black powder. And have made it before. I wouldn't be dependent on modern firearms for meat.
     
  10. VUnder

    VUnder Well-Known Member

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    It would be a good idea for everybody to have a flintlock gun put away somewhere. Eventually the bullets will run out, and it may be a while before they are manufactured again. The flintlocks may ease us on through the rough road to recovery. I have been paying attention to how they made colonial guns.
     
  11. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    I've been debating buying a couple for some time.
     
  12. md1911

    md1911 Member

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    I think you would like the ability to make everything you needed to keep shooting.
     
  13. VUnder

    VUnder Well-Known Member

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    There was a nice article about them in the Backwoodsman magazine. Just buying a lock, and he had a source for a cheap barrel, make your own stock. You could make you a shot gun and just shoot pea gravel if you had to, but it would be better than nothing.
     
  14. VUnder

    VUnder Well-Known Member

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    What about the old Match Lock type guns? Wouldn't one of those be easier to fabricate? If you could make powder, then you could easily make your own "punk" to ignite it with. But, then again, keeping that lit all the time might be a hassle, or having a way to light it quickly.
     
  15. md1911

    md1911 Member

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    True but you with a little practice can find and knapp your own flint. Wich is better because you don't have to worry about the match going out.

    speak softley and carry a big stick
     
  16. BillM

    BillM BillM

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    Just a note on black powder.
    It never goes bad.
    If you get it wet, it is still just as powerful once it dries out.
    If you are handleing a vintage black powder weapon or ordinance, be aware that it is likely still loaded and you can still get killed by it . Treat it the same as you would a modern firearm or artillary shell.
     
  17. bananagoatgruff

    bananagoatgruff Junior Member

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    Flintlocks for Survival

    I think a flintlock would be a good thing to have stored away in a secret place as well as your know how to make powder and ball. My guess is you want be free handing it like those cats in 1776 either. I'd be looking for a rest or atleast some shootin sticks.:D
     
  18. mojo4

    mojo4 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think a flintlock is very good at all. If you have a supply of black powder you can reload your own ammo. With a large supply of primers and scavenged brass you and others shoot you can have ammo for a long time. Its not difficult to make a bullet. I don't relaod but I have seen others do it and its not that hard.
     
  19. mojo4

    mojo4 Well-Known Member

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    Preloaded rounds definitely beat flintlock shooting, just ask the civil war vets!
     
  20. bananagoatgruff

    bananagoatgruff Junior Member

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    a southerner was quoted in Georgia that "shermans men loaded on sunday and shot all week long..."