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We got our first frost in NW PA this morning. It was beautiful driving to work just after dawn. It wasn't a killing frost, but it made me finally feel like the clock is ticking to get everything put up. I still have a fair number of broccoli and cabbage heads that could use some more growth, but everything else is pretty much done as the Fall Spinach, Kale and Lettuces got decimated by something I never did see and the fall peas never even flowered (but we have been eating the leaves in salads to replace the spinach)

I will have a last round of green beans and corn (hopefully) to can this weekend, but other than putting the garlic in the ground in a few weeks, I am pretty much done for the year. Knowing this, I am already longing for next year and planning next year's garden layout. :scratch

That being said, it brings me to the reason for my post...does anyone grow year-round? I don't have a good Southern exposure where the wife would allow me to start an indoor garden, but my BIL has a hydroponic system that he hasn't been using and I may be able to confiscate cheaply. Anyone have experience with hydroponics? I have done a few searches, but the info points me in toomany directions. I would rather go straight to someone who has done it versus someone who is selling me something. Thanks.
 

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We are under a frost warning tonight!! :eek:

The only thing I have left in the garden is the cotton ... As for grow year-round .. I do use cold frames and cloches ... to extend the season or to get an extra head start.
 

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The wanderer
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And I sit here green with envy because you all get your frosts so late! We almost always have a frost by the first of Sept! But all those sheet and blankets from the thrift store kept my garden alive, by covering it at night, into October after several frosts!
 

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We planted turnips and mustard greens after work yesterday. I got the fall tomatoes tied up again. We have picked tomatoes as late as December. We still have peppers, eggplant & butternut squash producing, the lettuce and cabbage are looking good. Having to water, no rain yet. We usually get a first frost around Thanksgiving, but we cover or mulch and keep things going until first freeze.
 

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Meoww
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We will have another month at least :D Peppers are still producing.
 

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I will be in the wood's well before dawn in the morning, early muzzle loading season here. Should have low to mid 30's here and the first good frost. I hope so the deer will move good in the morning if we get a goodin. :D
 

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Kyfarmer, Good luck with the early muzzle loading season ... we are in bow right now. (not much luck ... so far. lol)

We had a light frost this morning ... just a taste of things to come ... didn't bother the cotton, so I'm good there.:2thumb:
 

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No frost here yet. Now last year we had our first frost on Sept. 4
 

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Lake Erie is keeping us warm right now, we may have another month to go before our first frost. Then my favorite part of fall, indian summer.
 

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We've had a couple killing frosts already, so about the only thing left in the garden still producing is broccoli, carrots, and raspberries. The green beans were covered, but still froze. Short of a greenhouse, I don't have any way to grow and harvest year-round here. We have a cold microclimate here, usually get an earlier fall and later spring frost than neighbors a few miles away. I plant some things in the fall and let them come up on their own in the spring - carrots will do that here if the chickens aren't allowed near them, and winter wheat, of course. Potatoes come up as volunteers each spring from missed (or deliberately left) little spuds.

But as far as actually keeping things growing all year? I'm dreaming of a lovely greenhouse addition on the south end of the house...a place I can use my wringer washer all winter without getting wet, where I can open the kitchen nook window to either vent heat into the house from the greenhouse on sunny winter days, or vent heat from the woodstove in the house to the greenhouse in inclement weather. Oh, yes, and grow tomatoes, cukes, green beans and other vegies all winter. :)
 

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The wanderer
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I'm dreaming of a lovely greenhouse addition on the south end of the house...a place I can use my wringer washer all winter without getting wet, where I can open the kitchen nook window to either vent heat into the house from the greenhouse on sunny winter days, or vent heat from the woodstove in the house to the greenhouse in inclement weather. Oh, yes, and grow tomatoes, cukes, green beans and other vegies all winter. :)
My dream exactly! Nice to know someone else longs for the same thing!

We've got 6 sliding glass patio doors sitting out there waiting for such a project...

Someday...
 

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Well, the weather finally cleared up, we have had about a week and half of cold rainy weather here. Cold for us mid 50's, but the fall garden loves it, second crop of Kennebec and red potatoes, strawberries are still producing some berries and the tomatoes are still coming on, and the lettuce and carrots going crazy........and yes I need to weed the tomatoes:surrender:
 

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The wanderer
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Um.....what can I say? Get out there and weed those tomatoes! You're slacking! :D

It looks great! I love seeing pictures of your garden!
 

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Uhhh, BunkerBob, in that pic of you standing in the middle of a strawberry row..........you're lookin' a little skinny. :D
 

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Thanks for mentioning Strawberries as I meant to ask but forgot.

I have some small strawberry plants in a tray. What's the best way to store them over the winter (in the North East). Leave them out to be frozen, keep in the house, keep in a dark cool place...?
 

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Thanks for mentioning Strawberries as I meant to ask but forgot.

I have some small strawberry plants in a tray. What's the best way to store them over the winter (in the North East). Leave them out to be frozen, keep in the house, keep in a dark cool place...?
I cover them after they show signs of distress from the cold with a thick layer of straw, thus the term 'strawberries', they do just fine after they are established. Pack the root stocks in sawdust and put them in a plastic bag, poke some small holes in it and mist them before sealing up, not to much or they will rot, keep in a cool dark place. By spring you will see them attemping to sprout.
 

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Uhhh, BunkerBob, in that pic of you standing in the middle of a strawberry row..........you're lookin' a little skinny. :D
My guess is to much fiber in his diet.:D
 
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