Fireplace insert, firebrick and insulation.

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by BlueShoe, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. BlueShoe

    BlueShoe ExCommunicated

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    I installed a used insert in a masonry fireplace. The unit came with firebrick, but I'm ignorant of what to do with it. Does the brick just lay in the bottom to protect the floor of the firebox? Also, where do you get the insulation to pack between the surround and stove face? The glass doors I took out appear to have common bat insulation. Doesn't seem very safe with the temps of a wood stove.

    Thanks.
     
  2. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    I'd try to get a manual for the model you have.

    If you know it's complete and you have the right number of firebrick, yes, they normally cover the floor. Some models have fire brick on the sides as well so just be sure you aren't supposed to have some there as well. For mine, the firewood is laid right on the brick as opposed to being on a rack. Also, it's a good idea to have about 1" of ashes on the bottom. They help keep your embers hot.

    It's been many years but I remember the insulation being like you said (looking like normal insulation). I'd call a place that sells them to see if it is. I don't remember but was thinking the faced side was actually sticky and stuck to the stove surround.
     

  3. backlash

    backlash Well-Known Member

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    My insert had fire brick all the way around the inside.
    The seal around the door is a special fireproof rope like material.
    Go to a place that sells stoves and look at theirs.
     
  4. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Hardware stores and the big home improvement stores carry them as well. Just ask there. They will know what you want. I replaced mine last fall and bought 2 spares from our local Ace Hardware.
     
  5. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    The fire brick just lay on the floor and stand up around the sides of my wood stove. They protect the steel from the high temps.

    The door seal is fiber glass rope. It comes in different sizes and can be had pretty cheap by the foot from McMaster-Carr. A fireplace store has it in a pinch, but be prepared to pay good. High temp automotive RTV will glue it into place on the cheap.
     
  6. EX121

    EX121 New Member

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    Chimney

    Make sure that your chimney is clean and able to take the new possibly higher tempratures.
     
  7. BlueShoe

    BlueShoe ExCommunicated

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    Thanks, all. I had enough brick to lay all over the bottom and a small amount to stand on edge along the sides. For safety I'll probably pick up 4-5 more to add to the sides standing on them on their side as well. I was able to generate about 300+ degrees max from the stove according to a magnetic thermometer on the door. The stove has no model number, but I'm told it's an Aurora. Some door parts have been rebuilt, so I don't know the maker for sure.

    The insulation I'm talking about is around the back of the face flange where it slides back against the brick chimney opening. I already replaced the rope seals on the door and door glass. To this point I just shoved fiberglass insulation between the brick face and the stove flange.
     
  8. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    I've never seen or heard of the smoke pipe being sealed into the chimney with insulation ( I'm a HVAC tech). They are normally cemented in place. You can use regular old cement or a plumbing supply shop will have "furnace cement" it comes in a coffee can size tub and it's about as thick as butter. It sets up in a couple hours depending on the brand.

    Make sure the metal pipe is inserted deep enough to make it into the flue, but not too deep that it will partially block the flue. Wood stove exhaust gets HOT and it's not something to fool with if you're not sure there's a lot of good info with pic or vids online.
     
  9. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    I've never seen or heard of the smoke pipe being sealed into the chimney with insulation ( I'm a HVAC tech). They are normally cemented in place. You can use regular old cement or a plumbing supply shop will have "furnace cement" it comes in a coffee can size tub and it's about as thick as butter. It sets up in a couple hours depending on the brand.

    Make sure the metal pipe is inserted deep enough to make it into the flue, but not too deep that it will partially block the flue. Wood stove exhaust gets HOT and it's not something to fool with if you're not sure there's a lot of good info with pic or vids online.
     
  10. BlueShoe

    BlueShoe ExCommunicated

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    If you look at the front of fireplace insert with the stove ready to slide into the fire box, there's a flat steel flange (large collar) that surrounds the stove on the sides and top. When the stove slides back against the FACE of the masonry fireplace, the flange contacts the masonry, but you have to insulate with something to pervent the smoke from seeping back around the stove and into the room. What do you guys use there? I just shoved fiberglass insulation between the brick and steel flange/collar for a gasket.

    Regarding lining, when I had the chimney cleaned I asked about lining the flue. The tech said it would be very difficult to line this one. It's narrow and steps sideways at a about a 45 degree angle to a narrow flue of only 7.5" x 13". I would have to have a two piece liner. One piece for the stepped portion to an oval liner in the flue. Due to distance you couldn't attach them to each other. Another problem is the transition from stepping at an angle to the straight flue. It's got a HARD corner from one to the other. Then cleaning would require a disassembly of the lower section.

    If it was a one piece flex with some insulation, it would have to be a small diameter and would be beaten up pretty badly making the corner.

    ETA: The tech said just be vigilant and clean/inspect yearly. So the insert is just in the firebox with no liner. Not what I want, but...
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2010
  11. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Disregard, I didn't know it was an insert. I was talking about sealing smoke pipe to the chimney on a Franklin Stove.
     
  12. BlueShoe

    BlueShoe ExCommunicated

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    Thanks. The thing is storming on now. I had to choke it down by top and screw vents at around 400 degrees. I think it's working.:woohoo: