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Texas!!!
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Electric fence with a solar charger is an easy way to keep deer and racoons out of your garden. You state Extension office should be able to help you. That's what they get paid for.
 

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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
What are some of the fastest growing vegetables?
Bamboo is considered an invasive species in America that displaces native plants here - mainly because it thrives in hot climates, like that normally found in the southern states, and years with heat waves like this one all over. Most in America view bamboo as a nuisance, but I love to eat bamboo shoots. I saw the bamboo growing in my freinds' backyard as a culinary opportunity instead of a problem.

Only NEW bamboo shoots are edible (the stalks are far too tough) and you must harvest the new growth immediately after they "shoot" out of the ground (which is usually at the crack of dawn). If you let the shoots grow out for even TWO DAYS, the tender insides will become too hard and inedible.

The harvest season starts around March, in normal climes for the plant and lasts a month or two, up here in Ohio, I start in May & get shoots until well into July! I know it's bamboo time when rabbits and deer overcome their fear of being shot and suddenly appear in the backyard, because they love fresh bamboo as well. You may think that this isn't really a viable food source, but my first 'season' of actively harvesting collected close to a hundred pounds of bamboo shoots, in a patch less than 1/2 acre! I traded almost all of it for buffet privileges at a local 'Chinese' restaurant.

Shoot removal is best done using a shovel. The shoots should be cut then boiled quickly to stop the hardening process. After that, the shoots can be cut into chunks and frozen - they will keep for many months.
 

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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
I have heard of sauteing radishes and more recently, I saved a recipe for creamed radishes.This recipe calls for heavy cream, and I am sure it tastes better with cream, but I would be inclined to use milk.

Creamed Radishes
1 pound radishes
2 TBL butter
2 TBL flour
1/2 salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1/2 cup heavy cream

Cut radishes in half lengthwise. Place into a pot with 1 cup of boiling water. Simmer until radishes are pierceable and still a little firm. Drain.

Add butter to pot and melt. Add flour and whisk til smooth. Stir in salt & pepper. Whisk in cream and continue cooking until thickened.
Stir in radishes. Serve warm.
Guess I'll include one as well:

Chinese Bamboo Shoots with Pork Recipe
Ingredients:
1/2 pound pork
3 cups of boiled fresh bamboo shoot
2 tablespoons cooking oil
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoons chili sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
1/4 cup chicken broth
2 cloves garlic
pinches of salt to taste OR soy sauce

Instructions:
1. Cut bamboo shoot into strips (along the grain); cut pork into strips as well;
2. Chop/slice garlic as finely as possible
3. Heat the cooking oil and sauté garlic first , then drop pork into pan and sauté until it is done
4. Next, drop in the bamboo strips and chicken broth, then stir fry
for 4-5 minutes
5. Add oyster sauce, chili oil, sesame oil and dash salt to taste. Keep stir frying for 2-3 minutes until the liquid in the pan is absorbed by the bamboo shoots.
 

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I found a sub for Water Chestnuts too.. Jerusalem artichokes. Peel and add to your recipe.. they don't cook down soft soft if you add them to the end.. adds the perfect crunch.. not quite a water chestnut but not bad either.
 

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I planted climbing green beans in early July and was picking mature beans by the end of the month. I harvested the last of them at the end of September. I put up another trellis and planted a second crop about the 3rd week of September. With the cooler weather they are not coming up quite as fast as the first batch but I should get another harvest by the end of October, if we don't get an early freeze. Next year I will start them earlier in the spring and plant a fresh trellis about every 5 weeks. I figure 4 plantings should provide fresh tender beans all summer and into the fall. They grow very fast.

I make a trellis by driving two 6' poles into the garden about 10' apart, then stretching rectangular grid wire fencing between them... stapled to the poles, about a foot off the ground. Plant the beans in a row directly beneath the fencing. They find it and climb right on up. Makes a good support, but creates a 5 ' green wall so you want to plant them at the north end of the garden or they will block the sun from the rest of the crops.
 

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The mushroom thing is a bit misleading, they pop up real fast but the majority of the growing is done below the ground or inside the medium you are using. It takes a while for the fungi to grow to adequate size then they pop out the mushrooms very quickly but they are just the "fruit". Kind of analgous to asparagus and bamboo, the part you see grows really quick but take a while to get established.

Radishes are indeed fast if you can use them, most other greens as well. Swiss chard is amazingly prolific, you cut it back to the ground and next week it is a foot tall again, yet not invasive.
 

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<sigh> I just "liked" a post on this thread made in 2008. I really should pay attention to dates. :brickwall:
 

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You are not alone Country, I just liked a post in this thread 2 pages back....then read your post.

My like was for 2011 however <lol>.

Still warranted the like though no matwhat wat year it was posted in.
 

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We grow micro greens, better use of seed than sprouts. Can have good salad greens in 2 to 3 weeks.
I have a ten week rotation for a lot of the vegies I grow. That's to maturity but I'm picking thinnings much earlier than that. Check the days to maturity of each variety to shorten rotation. Carrot and beet thinnings can be steamed whole or used as normal, cabbage family thinnings can be steamed or stir fried etc, pea and faba bean plants when young can be eaten in salads or lightly cooked, onions can be used as spring onions. A few google searches will give you heaps of ideas.
 

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radishes, lettuce, peas, asparagus, rhubarb, okra are all fast IMO. Radishes are probably the fastest. I plant radishes in between my carrot rows.
 
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