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From reading around, I know that alot of you have helpful animals that would be even more of a help in a SHTF situation such as a food shortage or a crash in the economy, but I have only family pets. We have 2 dogs, a Chihuahua and a Toy Fox Terrier. My son has a gerbil and my daughter has some fish. I know that they would be no help in a bad situation, only something else to deal with so I am wondering what you guys with family pets have planned on doing with them in case of a crises?
 

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In my personal opinion,,,,the words "Family Pets" translates into:
Family=immediate family members
Pets=ranks just below the importantance of my children

I have a bug out box for our two small dogs. Their bug out box has the following:
20lb bag of their favorite dog food
water and food bowls for each
1 toy for each (2 total)
1 bed for each (2 total)
1 spare leash for each (2 total)
1 stake out pin
complete medical records (including shot records) of each
4 liters of water (2 2ltr bottles)
Their shirts, sweaters, and coats

If we had to bug out, then we'd put any and all of their meds that we have, into their BoB.

These are Boston Terrier crossbreeds that make/are great watchdogs. With them around, I can sleep at night. They will earn their keep for that and several other reasons.
 

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From reading around, I know that alot of you have helpful animals that would be even more of a help in a SHTF situation such as a food shortage or a crash in the economy, but I have only family pets. We have 2 dogs, a Chihuahua and a Toy Fox Terrier. My son has a gerbil and my daughter has some fish. I know that they would be no help in a bad situation, only something else to deal with so I am wondering what you guys with family pets have planned on doing with them in case of a crises?
We dont keep (wait thats not quite true anymore , we traded a useless dog for peace n quiet a few weeks back:eek:) pets that either dont do some sort of work around the place or that are not edible..

If we had indoor birds or gerbils etc then in a shtf situation they would be set free rather than trying to haul them around with us or figure out what to feed them over an extended period of time. I would at least attempt to let them free and make them self a new life in the big world but if i absolutely knew they could not survive out there then they would be put down.

As for the rest of the critters if we had to bug out somewhere we would get the goats to follow us long and the dogs to herd them round and if we could we would drag a chicken or two with us . Other wise they would become jerky in short order and hauled around in the back packs
 

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I don't think that most family pets could make it if they were used to a certain lifestyle, then one day they got set free to fend for themselves. I also think that you may not have time to put them down in a crises. In that case, I would just say leave them behind to either fend for themselves or die off. You and your family are first priorities.
 

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Pet Preparedness

I do stockpile a couple hunded pounds of feed for my 4 hens. I don't stockpile any for my 2 Yorkies and Great Dane. BUT. Here is something I learned from my Vet. After a surgery my Dane had a very weak system and would not eat at all. My Vet put her on a diet of boiled rice and Cottage Cheese.

All three dogs loved and thrived on it. Try it, it is a cheap experiment.

We have 100's of pounds of rice in our LDS food storage plan. Freeze Dried Cottage cheese is available, 30 year shelf life and is reasonably priced. So we added some.

Voila! Instant dog food storage. My cats? Better start ratting.

I like the solution because it is universal for people, dogs AND chickens.
 

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I know grandma fed her dogs on porridge (oatmeal) and table scraps. They were all on the fattish side of healthy, and all lived 15+ years. I have accustomed my dogs (one 60 pound mutt, one mastiff) to eating table scraps routinely, and porridge for a treat. I believe they will make the transition to straight table scraps and porridge pretty easily, if the need arises. Now, I stockpile a few bags of (rather pricey) dog food, and a bunch of (very cheap) oatmeal.

For the cats, I am not quite sure, yet. The younger ones will become mousers, but my old guy (15 years old) might just not make it. If we had chickens, I'd feed him on scrambled eggs, but he's too arthritic to hunt, and the arthritis is in his jaw, too, so he doesn't chew too well. Given that he's outlasted several long-term boyfriends and a few jobs, as well as three inter-provincial moves, I'll do my best to keep him healthy and with me. If it's so bad that I really have to quit feeding or abandon my critters, I'm not sure how badly I'd want to survive it...
 

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Didn't have any to worry about, then those dang women went and got a dang shatzoo or whatever for my granddaughter. Dang it but lucky in that i,am where i will be till i,am planted anyway. So there ya go. Will not even make a good bowl of soup. ;) What were they thinking. If i had just not answered that stupid add about a hairball for sale. :rolleyes:
 

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I have two cats. One older and one just a chubby baby right now. I love them more then anything and would do everything in my power to keep them.

I knew this old woman who had over 100 cats in and around her house. She fed them trays of rice and ground turkey meat. Everyday she would put out five huge trays and it would all disapper within an hour. As you might expect her house did not smell very good.:eek:
 

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Why is it old-women and significant numbers of cats/pets go hand-n-hand???

I heard about an old woman in Edmonton (city 3hr drive straight north of me) had a beautiful house in a very nice neighborhood that had free-roaming rabbits inside her house. They found close to 500 of the little beasties living in the duct-work, inside the walls, chewed through electrical ... and, yes, these little beasties were not potty-trained. Inches of fecal matter and fur lined the whole house. :eek:
 

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My 10 YO black lab, Wendy, will be staying with me and helping keep an eye on the place. I keep one 50# bag of food ahead and have a case of FD rice, case of 9 grain cereal and a few #10’s of freeze dried beef broth for her too. I took on the responsibility of looking after her and will do all I can to make sure she is as safe and happy as I plan on being.
 

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I'll definitely keep my 70 pound bull terrier with me. He's a good watch dog, well trained and protective. Keep his vaccinations up to date and store some syringes, antibiotics and other meds for any injury he may get.

Several years ago a pup showed up at the house I had at the time. I knew enough to keep him seperated from my dogs just in case. Turned out to be a good thing. The pup had Parvo I called a vet who said all he could do is give it an IV and maybe he'd make it but it would be expensive. He suggested I mix some gatorade or pedialite with any flavoured Jello, which is high in protein and give it to him through a turkey baster, every hour or so. He also said to give him some fresh chicken broth. I'll be darned if the pup wasn't better within a couple hours. Now I keep those things on hand.
 

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I have 2 second hand cats, a Ma and Son. One is good at catching rats, the other is a good mouser. :D Those women can't be playing with a full deck! I use dried cat food as it is cheaper than tinned and helps keep their teeth in tip top condition, thus saving on vet bills later on! ;)
 

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Catastrophy-Your right about the old woman I knew. She give you the shrit off her back, but the light bulbs were starting to go out upstairs, if you know what I mean.
 

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IMHO your pets are a part of the family. So as you would with your " 2 legged kids" you need to think of your pets during your prep planning. To fail to do so IMO is extremely irresponsible. Many companys make emergency "kits" for pets. (example;) www.costco.com/pet emergency kits
These kits vary a little bit but average aroung $50-$60 bucks come in a 5 gallon bucket with food, first aid supplies, toy(s) and several other items.

We built our own, we have in addition to 21 days supplies in our BOV. We also have sealed and stored another close to 4 months supplies that can be loaded in a trailer and ready to go in less than 10 minutes. These in addition to our " bug in supplies" give us a total currently of 19+ months of supplies and growing weekly. These INCLUDE supplies for our pets. A 90 pound wolf/malamute cross we rescued as well as a 80 pound greyhound/shepard mix who is also a rescue along with two cats. We also have made plans to take them along if something happens and we have to leave.
 

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Water, Water, Water. Thats the name of the game. If your dogs have clean water to drink they can survive for multiple days like humans without food.

Dogs have a much lower "visual appeal" standard than humans and will eat damn near anything when hungry. Sure your dog is picky now, but give them a few days and they'll eat anything.

Ultimately my point is to bring what you can, but at some point you'll be feeding the pets whatever you can find. Remember, what disgusts us (as long as it's not rotten) wont phase a hungry dog.

For us, our German Shepherd will eat up whatever food we have in her bin then switch to our Mainstay bars.
 

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I've got a 200lb Mastiff who isn't afraid to eat anything I put in front of him, and he's not afraid to grab a meal on the run, if you know what I mean. I don't worry about rats, raccoons or any other vermin around here.... 2 legged or 4. ;-)
 
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