Expecting/trying for a baby? THEN YOU MUST READ THIS!

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by Naiad, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. Naiad

    Naiad Guest

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    THE most important book you will ever read, even if you aren't expecting a baby, is:

    Natural Childbirth the Bradley Way (Revised Edition) by Susan McCutcheon (copyright 1996, published by Plume, an imprint of Dutton Signet, a division of Penguin Books USA Inc.)

    and the book by Doctor Bradley himself (which is just as important to read, but not written in a so simple-to-follow way as McCutcheon's book, who was actually somone that worked with Dr. Bradley).

    Husband-Coached Childbirth (Fifth Edition) by Robert A. Bradley. M.D. (copyright 2008, published by Bantam Books).


    What the Bradley Method is: just the way that women and other perspiring mammals have been giving birth since the dawn of our existence, before the hospital birth became the "in" thing, which has only been since the 1940s and all the military wives were doing it - and it's never gone back out of style since.
    Even if you plan on a hospital birth, this information is important for you to be able to make informed decisions and approach the whole thing with confidence you simply would not have otherwise.
    Also, it's crucial for you to know how to proceed if you go into labor and are unable to get any help, should you desire it - like if your baby is due in midwinter and you live way out in the boonies... you're blizzarded in... now what? With the know-how in these books, you shouldn't have any real problems, but don't forget to prepare - ordering a home-birth kit or emergency birthing kit (or both) online is a great investment for a low cost (keep one in the closet and one in the car). I'll post a link later with a few sites you can order from.
    And no, Bradley didn't get his ideas from Lamaze, it's actually the other way around, Lamaze came a couple decades after Bradley started practicing - it's actually the perverted brain-child of hospital maternity wards who don't want "problem patients". :p
     
  2. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    hey, anything that helps get those rugrats out of the Play-Do Fun Factory of Life safely I'm all for

    but remember, people, even tho a lot of medicine is charlatanry, pre-natal care/examination is still important, to make sure there aren't any serious problems at least ;)
     

  3. Naiad

    Naiad Guest

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    As promised, I'm posting where to get kits from.

    The best site that I've found to order kits from is inhishands.com where they have complete kits for a decently low price, I recommend getting the deluxe kit for $38 AND the emergency kit for $11, they also have an option to get a custom kit based on the kit your midwife has (provided she/he has ordered from them). Another good site to order stuff from is everythingbirth.com and they have stuff for mama and baby, not just birthing kits, including baby clothes, natural toys, herbal products, and breastfeeding accessories.
    Sites to check out for yourself are:
    homebirthkits.com
    mamagoddessbirthshop.com
    birthwithlove.com
    unassistedhomebirth.com

    Plus a heck of a lot more, just go to scroogle.org and type in "home birth kit" for your search. (NOT scroogle.COM, but scroogle.ORG!)

    And I agree about getting care, but get somebody that's on the same page as you. Remember, it's about YOU and YOUR BABY, not THEM and their paycheck or "routine" P&P (policies and procedures) or their ego. YOU'RE in charge, and YOU pay THEM for a SERVICE, but if they still want to run the show, dump them and find someone else.
     
  4. OldFashionedMama

    OldFashionedMama Partyin' like it's 1699

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    We read that while we were planning on our first home birth with our second child. Ultimately we did not take any Bradley classes or even use his method, but it really helped my husband understand the birth process and learn when to help and when to stay away. My older sister and her husband just had their first and used the Bradley method with great success. She couldn't have a home birth because of a heart problem, and had to deliver at a hospital with very high cesarean rates. Her labor was about 20 hours, minimally augmented with pitocin, but nonetheless a natural, healthy delivery. They are really glad they took the Bradley classes!
     
  5. Naiad

    Naiad Guest

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    I'm curious, how did you not use the method in your home birth? I understand not taking the classes, having read the books there's really not much of a need at all for the classes, but what did you use or add to your experience to the point that you weren't using the Bradley method (which is actually just the way that women and animals naturally give birth, as is even admitted in the books)?
     
  6. OldFashionedMama

    OldFashionedMama Partyin' like it's 1699

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    By the time I went into labor, I could hardly stand to have my midwife examine me, let alone anyone else get near me, so my husband was pretty much a bystander and not a physically active participant in the birth itself. Towards the end, my husband was trying to rub my back or do something, (I can't remember honestly!) and I whipped around and bit him on the arm...really bizarre I know but it was like this primal instinct took over and I was like GET THE HECK AWAY FROM ME!!!! :D A few minutes later our second son was born.

    I think I ultimately decided to not use his method "by the book" as it were...I just didn't feel a need for that much support. I was birthing at home, in an environment where I had complete control over what happened, and it seemed to me that the Bradley method was suited more towards women having a birth in a medical setting and wanting to avoid intervention. I didn't have to worry about those things at home.

    I should also add that with son#2, we were originally planning an unassisted birth. It was not until very late into the pregnancy that we finally located a midwife in our area and decided to hire her. Since I was already in the DIY mindset, that surely had a lot to do with my feelings towards any kind of "coaching".
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2009
  7. Naiad

    Naiad Guest

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    Actually, though you may not feel or believe it, you used the method to a T. :D From the way you describe it, you just gave birth the way women always have, before all the Big Medica hullabaloo, the difference is that you knew what you were doing, which is really what the books and the method are all about I think. It's not a perfect play-by-play to follow, just some guiding know-how. ;)

    And perhaps you may feel that it's more suited to a medical setting, but I'd have to respectfully disagree with that view - not to invalidate yours by any means, mind you, but simply coming from my own experience.
    Suffice it to say that I have given birth before, and my husband and I felt we needed to take the responsibility on ourselves to learn how to proceed if we were unable to get any help when the time came for the birth. Well, we learned, and we prepared, and when the time came our suspicions were correct and it was just us and the kid, with my husband delivering the baby. Had we not read the books, studied, and prepared, we would have been stranded and panicked and I would have been in very bad shape. So that's where I'm coming from. :)
     
  8. OldFashionedMama

    OldFashionedMama Partyin' like it's 1699

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    That's what happened with our first. We were completely unprepared, horrible hospital birth, miracle I didn't have a cesarean, and a back injury caused by a nurse who jammed my leg back as far as it could go, dislocating a disc in my spine. Took two full years of intensive chiropractic and physical therapy to fix it.

    So I'm assuming you guys had an unassisted birth? In some ways I wish we would have done that, but in many others it was nice to have my midwife there. I got "stuck" in both my son's and daughter's labor and she had to use evening primrose oil to get things moving...something that could have meant trouble if we were alone. My sister in law and her husband are expecting their first baby and they're going to use the Bradley method. Given that and a family history of EXTREMELY fast births, she should do great!
     
  9. Naiad

    Naiad Guest

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    Give her my congratulations please! :D
     
  10. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    At-home births have always intimidated me. We have friends who had no problems and a friend who went through hell and was rushed to a hospital. Glad to see it becoming more popular though, more skilled mid-wives.
     
  11. OldFashionedMama

    OldFashionedMama Partyin' like it's 1699

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    I knew someone who had an unassisted VBAC...she had a beautiful experience but all the same I don't think I would take the risk myself. My midwife has been delivering babies for 30 years. She's seen it all, done it all, and if she senses ANYTHING is not right, she will push for a hospital transfer. Always important to be safe!