Essentials for surviving EMP

Discussion in 'General Survival Discussion' started by Starcreek, Oct 21, 2017.

  1. Starcreek

    Starcreek Here a while

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    What was "doomer porn" is now at the door. It is quite conceivable that we (in the U.S.) might face an EMP attack in the near future. By near future, I mean possibly before the end of the year. So, how do we prepare for such a thing in a PRACTICAL manner?

    The best way to prepare for losing all electrical / electronic conveniences is by remembering the Survival Rule of 3's:


    • You can survive for 3 Minutes without air (oxygen) or in icy water
    • You can survive for 3 Hours without shelter in a harsh environment (unless in icy water)
    • You can survive for 3 Days without water (if sheltered from a harsh environment)
    • You can survive for 3 Weeks without food (if you have water and shelter)

    So, assuming we still have air / oxygen to breathe, shelter is the number one priority. With winter coming on, even those of us in the South will need to give this some thought.


    SHELTER -- In the event of an EMP, you probably will not have car, electricity, Internet, cell phone, electric heat or cooking. You probably won't have landline phone, either, because even if your phone company has back-up generators, those probably won't last more than the first day. Even if your city water comes from a tank on a hill by gravity-feed, how long will that last? If you have a well, do you have a back-up plan for when the pump goes out? Toilets should flush, if they go to a septic tank. But if you're on city sewer, even the toilet won't last long. So, the question becomes: Will you shelter in place or bug out? If you plan to bug out, is that BOL prepared for your arrival?


    WATER -- As already mentioned, you may have trouble with your water supply, if we are attacked with an EMP. Well pumps won't work. City water won't last for long. The first thing to do, when you realize you are completely grid-down, is fill the bathtub with water. And then, you need to have back-up: A well bucket or hand pump that can quickly and easily replace the pump, and the knowledge of how to do that. A spring nearby that can be used. Year-round streams are okay, but the water will need to be purified, by bringing to a hard boil for one minute, with a water purifier, or with purification tablets. Remember to have BUCKETS. You can never have too many 1-gallon or 5-gallon buckets. They're 2 bucks at the hardware store. Buy some!


    FOOD -- Anyone on this forum surely has more food in their cabinets than the average middle-class American. Surely. But how much do you have, and in what form? In a grid-down situation, the frozen food should be used first. I realize this is likely to be virtually meat-only for a week, followed by a vegetarian diet, but it's food. Do NOT open the freezer except to remove food to eat. Even now, it's helpful to put bottles of water in the freezer. The frozen water will help keep things cold if the power goes off, and you can always drink it later. Canned foods are simple and cheap to buy, and they'll usually keep a year or two. Figure two servings per can. Rice, beans, and pasta have servings listed. Calculate at least 5 servings per person per day. Try and have at least 6 months of food put up. SEEDS AND ANIMALS: Try to have some sort of renewable food -- garden seeds, small livestock, etc. Your 6 months storage should get you through until you can grow or raise something else to eat.


    SECURITY & MEDICINE -- At minimum, have a first-aid kit and a gun. Secondly, have some back-up prescription meds and plenty of extra ammo for that gun. If you have food, water, and shelter, but lack the means to keep it, what good does it do?


    Notice I did not mention your car or gasoline. Gas pumps will not work in a grid-down situation, but neither will your nice, shiny new, computer-operated car. Unless you have an old, pre-1972 clunker with no computer chips in it, you're not likely to ever drive your car again after an EMP strike.

    Get used to walking.
     
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  2. Sentry18

    Sentry18 Moderator Staff Member

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    My first thought is if my Taser stops working after an EMP can I go back to hitting people with a club? :)

    Good information Starcreek, thanks for posting.
     
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  3. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    Thanks Starcreek for the post :) .

    Upon testing of vehicles with an EMP with computer chips they say it is a 50/50 chance that it may still work, it is the luck of the draw really but not all vehicles will go down.
     
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  4. sewingcreations15

    sewingcreations15 Hard working Aussie

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    Sentry18 clubs are so in at the moment and by the way you can always pretend to be Neanderthal and that would look normal in a grid down situation anyway :D .
     
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  5. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    I often think that getting home in an EMP situation would be the biggest challenge for many people. even if cars still run the traffic would be a nightmare, :brickwall:
     
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  6. LincTex

    LincTex Jack of all trades?

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    The Bosch VE pump on my Cummins diesel is 100% mechanical. I can roll the truck down the hill & pop the clutch and she's running. No electricity needed.

    I could do the same on my 7.3 IDI F350, just disable the fuel cutoff solenoid on the Stanadyne pump and use the mechanical lever instead. It would need a bigger hill.... or pull start it with the Cummins F250.

    I have several tractors that are 100% mechanical.

    I can put ignition points in the Harley if I need to... But I have spare ignition modules anyway.
     
  7. RedBeard

    RedBeard aka. Red the Butcher

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    Just an addition to water, most people over the 20 gallons or more they have of fresh water that is stored safe in their hotwater heater.
     
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  8. terri9630

    terri9630 Internet Princess

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    Maybe not. A lot of people have switched to on demand tankless water heaters.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
  9. SheepdogPRS

    SheepdogPRS Newbie

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    A points type ignition will likely survive an E1 pulse from an HEMP. Non-electronic injected diesels will likely be fine too. The bad part is that the alternators will be useless without a spare set of diodes and new voltage regulators. I have parts stored for my alternators along with two spares that I have rebuilt in separate three layer protective shielding. The cars can easily be modified to run on alcohol so I can make my own fuel for short trips. Cars are not necessarily a good thing because they will rapidly become targets or a way to track you back to your home. The same could be true for radio transmissions. I have a good multi-band receiver that I can use to monitor radio news kept in a three layer E1 shield. I keep a laptop in a good shield so I can access my electronic files - information is good and while I have hard copies too, I keep the originals on DVD and CDs. After an HEMP there won't be an internet or electrical power grid so I have the means to charge my laptop and backups in storage.
    We will all be busy raising food and the other chores so we will not likely have much time to miss the internet.
     
  10. RedBeard

    RedBeard aka. Red the Butcher

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    Sure even those hold a gallon or two plus for those that have a basement they are often installed down there and can be used as a low point drain. Both hot and cold line hold a bunch of drinkable water.
     
  11. Sentry18

    Sentry18 Moderator Staff Member

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    Do they? My oldest sister has one and it is mounted directly onto a copper water pipe, there is no tank at all. There is coiled pipe inside of the unit but I am not sure there is a gallon worth. Not sure there isn't either. :dunno:
     
  12. Caribou

    Caribou Time Traveler Staff Member

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    Different brands might have as much as four gallons. There has to be some water in there as it takes time for the water to come up to temperature. To give them a head start this water is kept warm.
     
  13. RedBeard

    RedBeard aka. Red the Butcher

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    Caribou nailed it...
     
  14. SheepdogPRS

    SheepdogPRS Newbie

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    Instant hot water heaters use a small tank but on-demand heaters heat the water only when you turn on the faucet. on demand heaters are more economical because you don't keep any water hot.
     
  15. Caribou

    Caribou Time Traveler Staff Member

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    Thank you for the clarification. The point is that no matter the design there should be between a gallon and a half and four gallons of water available in an emergency.

    While we are talking about water heaters for emergency water I'd like to remind everyone that a standard water heater collects rust and other debris that settles to the bottom of the tank.

    I recommend the following semi-annual maintenance. I do mine in the fall and the spring.

    TURN THE HEATER OFF.

    Hook a garden hose to the bottom of the tank and run it to a drain, bucket, or outside. Shut off the water supply whether from the street, well, or tank.

    Open the drain valve at the bottom of the tank.

    Lift the lever of the temperature and pressure relief valve (T&P) to prevent a vacuum in the tank.

    Drain the tank until the water runs clear.

    Close the drain valve, open the inlet valve, and when the water reaches the T&P close it. The last saves purging as much air through the lines and much sputtering at the sinks. You have just gotten rid of several gallons of nasty water, improved the quality of your emergency water, and extended the life of your water heater.

    Sometimes, especially if this maintenance has not been done for years, the T&P valve will not fully close and you will have a drip. Do not be upset by this be grateful. Scale will build up inside your water heater over the years. In extreme cases it can prevent the T&P valve from opening. Should this happen, and subsequently the water heater overheats, then pressure can build up to the point where the water heater explodes taking a goodly portion of your house with it. T&P valves are cheap lives and homes are not.

    To replace a T&P valve drain the tank to below the level of the T&P valve, twist the valve out, and replace it with a valve with the same length of probe.
     
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  16. oldasrocks

    oldasrocks Well-Known Member

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    We only have a few thousand gallons in our pond. Yes we have Berkley filters.
     
  17. LastOutlaw

    LastOutlaw Well-Known Member

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    76 k5 With Hei distributor at off grid cabin and my last ditch emp proof transportation.
     

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  18. cqp33

    cqp33 Supporting Member

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    train that 'last ditch' to not look at the light! LOL nothing wrong with a 4 legged friend, they also have very sufficient "spidey" senses!
     
  19. RedBeard

    RedBeard aka. Red the Butcher

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    Your k5 makes me feel funny! I love k5's! My very first wheeling memories are from my dads 79 k5. 350 punched to 355, 400 turbo tranny, dana 60's front and rear, 10 inchs of lift of 35 inch swampers. That thing would go anywhere!
     
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  20. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    Mine was a 78 Jimmy 454 4 speed dana 44 / 14 bolt, wide 38.5 swampers 6 inch spring lift and lots of trimming
     
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