Does anyone know how to increase the pull strength of a bow?

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by lexsurivor, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    I just recently decided to take up archery (as in yesterday) so I bought a $90 youth compound bow (Best one at the store) and it is a good bow and I can hit a 6in target from about 15 paces (I just started so im still not that good) and the pull weight is only like 28 lbs. Its good for backyard shooting but I need it to be a bit stronger. What are some ways I can make it stronger?
     
  2. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    Not sure what kind you have exactly but on a youth compound bow, there's normally adjustment nuts where the limbs connect. They're like 1" hand turn nuts that have an allen wrench inset. You'll need the allen wrench... Tighten them up all the way. For my son, that still wasn't quite enough so I put some shims in on the outsides of the limbs to give it just a little more.
    Is this bow for you? Honestly, a youth bow is too small for an adult (both pull weight and draw length).
     

  3. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    BCZ has some good points. I'd be careful about shimming the outer limbs. Newer compounds are already greatly pre-stressed at the factory. Adding more could be dangerous (although a youth bow may not be stressed that much initially).

    More info on the bow would help. Some do have provisions for increasing both draw weight and draw length as needed. Generally, 35 lbs of draw weight is considered minimum for hunting deer size game. If you're only going to target shoot, draw weight isn't that important. It's quite adequate for small game as it is.

    That's pretty good shooting in such a short time. If you're interested I have a couple of older compound bows with a heavier draw weight at home here. I'd give you one if you want to pay the postage.
     
  4. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    I already tightend it all the way and I got it as a starter bow so I know im going to get a better one later on. But it is a Bear warrior III. Im using it for target practice but I also have intentions of using it on rabbits and small game (i live in the suburbs but still have a large wetland behind my backyard) if I bought some broadheads. Also it goes about 5-6 inches into a foam target from walmart using target points. And now that I think about it I did find some fawn tracks last week by my house. And thanks for the offer mmm Ill think about it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2010
  5. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    In my experience blunt points work best for hunting small game. Broadheads break easily and need resharpened every time you shoot them. Blunts don't ricochet as bad as field tips or broadheads. The best small game point (IMO) is the Judo point by Zwickey. It has wires sticking out from the point that grab onto grass, dirt, etc. and stop the arrow. It you're shooting into trees use a large rubber blunt point that won't stick in the bark. Get the Bludgeon Blunt made by Saunders. It will protect the arrow from damage and doesn't ricochet as bad as other rubber blunts do. These two are my favorite small game points.

    Your bow might have enough power to bring down a deer if everything is tuned to perfection. An arrow that flies perfectly straight with a two blade broadhead that cuts on impact and is placed accurately is far more important than draw weight. Check state game laws for restrictions that might apply. A bowhunter safety course is advised as well. (Even if it isn't required!)

    I'm glad you took up archery. Keep us posted on your progress and have fun!
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2010
  6. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. Today I was shooting out in the wind today to see how wind affects my shots and I realized Ive got my consistency down but I just need to find out where to aim to get the arrow in the target. I landed two arrows so close that they were touching but still didnt hit the target:eek: One thing that I learned was that walking through 10 ft of razor grass (the kind that sticks to you and cuts) to find an arrow is not fun. Next thing im buying is alot of good arrows. Right now I have 1 arrow that came with the bow and a carbon express arrow.
     
  7. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    If you're shooting modern (as opposed to traditional) carbon arows are the best way to go. I looked up the link and it looks like a decent set-up. A very good starter package. A mechanical release can help increase accuracy and consistency. When you have that much let-off it can be difficult to get a clean release using fingers.

    Now I think I need to get my bow out and do some shooting!:D
     
  8. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    If you're fooling with the bow make sure it is still "balenced". There's a tee-square style tool the snaps on to the string do measure any difference between the top and bottom limbs.

    Nothing wrong with learning to do it yourself, but have a shop dot it or atleast check your work if you're not sure.

    I used strips of the foli packets from an mre to shim my first bow when I out grew it. It only went up to 40-45 pounds. I just added a couple pounds of pull. Use DIY mods at your own risk.
     
  9. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    IIRC, that bow has adjustable sights. The nut closest to the bow adjusts windage (left and right) and the hex head nut on the outside adjusts elevation. When you adjust, follow your hit. E.g. if you are shooting high and right, raise your site and move the site to the right.
     
  10. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    The problem with the sight is its above the arrow and the arrow never gets to the height of the sight even at its lowest because the arrow never climbs.
     
  11. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Lex, that's why guys have a couple pins. Every one lhas their own way. I liked a pin for 15 yrd and one for 30 yrd. Est. the distance to the target and use the right pin. If est. 40 yrd ( my comfortable max ) I would use my 30 yrd pin and aim a bit high.

    One of the hardests shoots for me is accually straight down. If you end up with a deer nearly under your stand. My furtherest kill shot was 53 yrds. It was getting dark and I est. it around 40, aimed and fired. I was sure I hit it, but I couldn't find it ang was getting dark fast. I returned a first light and tracked it about 200 yrds away. My shot was inline with the heart but was pretty low. I went back to the stand and passed off where the deer was hit and came up with 53 yrd. That explained the low lung hit.
     
  12. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    Should I get a new sight and make it level with where the arrow rests?
     
  13. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    I don't mean to talk down to you, but what is your expierence level? Are you keeping the same anchor location? and releasing the same way each time. Most any sight should work, but it be set up for someone with a very different anchor than you if it was used.

    I've seen guy anchor high at their ear and other low near their neck.

    Might be best to visit a shop or find an experienced friend. Most shops are very friendly and glad to get you pointed in the right direction. You get it set up to match you for free or cheap, even if you are not spending a lot on money at the time. They know you'll be back later if they make you happy.
     
  14. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    2nd day. and I anchor the same way each time but if I put the sight anyless than 3 feet above the target it will drive an arrow into the ground.
     
  15. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    There's 2 pieces on the string where you slide the knock between them. Slide both of them down a couple inches. Voila! Your sights should be good (or better). You should be able to set/adjust so wherever you put that dot on the target, it should hit it at a pre-determined range (let's say 20 yards). After some practice, if you're at 30 yards, you'll know how much higher to aim.
     
  16. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    It sounds like the PO had a different anchor, or the knock on the string is in the wrong spot or something happened to your rest. Setting up a bow it like tuning up a carb. If one thing's wrong you're gonna stall out. The arrow should look level by eye if you knock it and place it on the rest with out drawing the bow.

    I don't think you need to buy anything new, just figure out what's out of wack and adjust it.
     
  17. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    I got it fixed thanks for the help.
     
  18. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Well spill the beans, what was it?
     
  19. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    I just moved the two rubber notch thingys down and zeroed in the sight. I can now hit the 6in target from 18-20 paces. Also on the side of the sight i spray painted a paper towel and wiped it on it then cut dashes in it for different ranges.
     
  20. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    You're doing well. Very creative on the sight markings. Sounds like you should be teaching us some things!