Does anyone know how to cache properly?

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by kejmack, May 22, 2011.

  1. kejmack

    kejmack Texas!!!

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    I would like to cache food and ammunition. Does anyone know how to do it properly? We have a high water table here and it is very humid year round so moisture is my main enemy.
     
  2. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    I've heard of using water-tight buckets but burying them upside-down. If water gets in around the seal, the airlock created by the bucket's sides and bottom (the bottom is now the 'top') keeps water from going up into the things stored in the bucket. If the buckets were upright and the seal leaked, the bucket would fill with water.

    If you used the widest diameter of PVC pipe that you could get and sealed the ends with the plumbing caps using the sealer (that purple stuff?) to create a water-tight and air-tight seal, that would protect whatever items would fit inside. Even things like wheat or rice could be stored in them, but you'd want to be careful about the glue on the end caps.
     

  3. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    You also want to be sure that the container and what you put in it are the same temperatures. If one is colder than the other you could end up with a condensation problem. Let both sit in the same room for at least 24 hours prior to sealing them.

    In the USMC we disassembled rifles, sumberged them in cosmoline then sealed them in foil bags for LTS. It might be a good idea to put some bags of dessicant in with any firearms or other metal object.
     
  4. Jimmy24

    Jimmy24 Member

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    One thing to remember, what you want your cache to do.

    Cache is a word that can be used a lot of different ways. I use it as a secert storage point of backup, replacement materials. Some may say that it is the secert place they keep all their preps.

    6 in PVC is what I have used. I have 3 caches. One has been in ground for 8 years. I used nitrogen to pruge mine and keep O2 at a minimum. Ammo, knives, salt, pepper, honey, rice, freeze-dried coffee, spare shirt and socks, matches, cigg lighters, candles. You need to check the area it's in every 6 months minimum.

    All can be fitted in a 4ft long pipe. I use post hole diggers to bury them. I'm sure I need to dig up the oldest one. Just to see.

    JGW
     
  5. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Be especially careful burying any metal objects where lightning may strike (ridge tops, near trees in otherwise open prairie, etc.). Lightning has been known to hit buried caches with some interesting results.

    Also, if you'll have to dig it up be sure to cache a shovel someplace nearby and easy to get to!
     
  6. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    You can seal food ammo in a foodsavor bag, then put in all in a plastic tote, put external silicone sealer around the top of the tote before you put the cover on,bury with at leat a foot of soil on top. nothing will get in.
     
  7. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    That's a great idea, but I'd like to add that you want to make sure that the load piled onto the tote isn't going to be heavy enough to crack or buckle it. So be careful of what might walk, park, or otherwise apply weight directly over where you bury the tote.

    The vacuum-sealed foodsaver bags will help keep your supplies dry in case the tote is breached and water gets in.