Does anyone here know how to rappel?

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by lexsurivor, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    Im guessing all the ex-Military people do. But I was bored today and I was wandering about rappeling so I just taught myself today (ok google did). I bought som rope from walmart (not expensive but it had a high enough strength rating) Then I bought a carbiner from Sportsman Warehouse. I made myself a swiss seat. Then attached the carbiner and had at it. I started out 17 ft off the ground (using a fireladder out my window to start from) I started out going way too fast so then after a few tries I wrapped the rope aroudnd the inside of the carbiner once and it slwoed my speed down in half. I eventualy worked my way up to the top and I rappeled out a 15 foot window. All for under 25$ :D

    Rope (346lb from walmart) $14
    Gloves $1 (Dollar tree)
    Carbiner $6

    Tommorow im going to try it from a 25 foot window.
     
  2. tyler_kd0bsa

    tyler_kd0bsa Well-Known Member

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    I was trained how to rappel before I could work on a challenge course. In my honest opinion its best to spend the money and buy some static rope that is rated for climbing. The rope I have is rated for at least 7500 pounds. Also if you plan to do it often a rappel belt or even better is a padded harness is much safer. I have my own climbing gear that I keep all together in a bag ready to go if for some reason I need it. A figure 8 rappel device is much safer to use then just using a carabiner. Oh and make sure that the carabiner is rated for climbing also. And if you can rappel on a doubled up rope its even better. I will help the life of the rope. I would suggest if you really want to get into it to get some sort of more formal training than from Google. That's just my opinion though.
     

  3. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    Moneys kind of tight right now. And my carbiner is climbing rated. he next thing im getting is a figure 8 but like I said money is tight.
     
  4. PamsPride

    PamsPride edirPsmaP

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    Yep! I have done it! :D
    The guy I went with went down face first...you know instead of backside first! :eek:
    I have pictures somewhere waaaayyyyy back in my blog of me going over the edge!
     
  5. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    I think thats called Aussie Rappeling.
    But Im going to have to get some new gloves the ones I have now keep on getting stuck. Other than that Im slowy getting better.
     
  6. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    I am scared to death of heights. I'd walk 10 miles to go around a hundred foot cliff before I flung myself over the edge on some string and a couple pulleys.
     
  7. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure exactly sure what that means but it sounds like the way I use a rope. Instead of tying the end of the rope off to an anchor point, I wrap it around something sturdy, use a barrel knot to rappel down and untie the knot at the bottom. Then I don't need to go back up and retrieve the rope; just untie the knot and pull the rope through.
     
  8. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I was raised in the mountains and to many of my flat-lander friends, I am a mountain-goat, able to scale the steepest cliffs without ropes or accessories ..

    I have done repelling - loved it while doing it, but, it got boring after a while ... base-jumping is what I wanna do next!
     
  9. HarleyRider

    HarleyRider Comic Relief Member

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    I'm getting too old for that. I'll just take the elevator. :D
     
  10. tyler_kd0bsa

    tyler_kd0bsa Well-Known Member

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    I find the middle and tie a figure 8 knot if it can be fixed and taken down from where it is hung from and clip it to a anchor with a carabiner. Otherwise I just hang the rope from the middle but make sure to tie the ends of the rope together since there is no knot to keep either end from moving up or down. Rappel and then untie the ends and pull the rope down.
     
  11. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Lex, be careful with that cheap gear. It's for lashing tarps, not life support. If money's tight save up. My money is tight too, but I'm not parachuting with a bed sheet. When you do get a rope you should keep a log and know the basic rules, inspect it before every use, never step on a rope, avoid oil/ grease etc. A Swiss seat is uncomfortable but "should" stay on if one part of the seat fails. A mountain seat allows more movement/comfort, but you will fall if any part of it fails.

    UncJoe, we call that type of rigging a suicide rappel. We would fold the rope in half and secure it at two different points. It gives you two ropes and two anchor points that need to fail before you fall. If no one wanted to or could not climb back up the last guy would retie the rope so it could be pulled down from the bottom.
     
  12. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    WOW only 300lbs! I just reread your post. You really need to stop before you get hurt. You can break that rope if you weight much less than 300lbs. because doubling speed will increase your weight by 4X. G-force increases with speed.

    You can rappel safely with two (proper) snap links. You don't need a figure 8 unless you want to lock off the line and you don't need a rescue 8 to lock off. You can do it with a standard 8. You can lock off with snap links, but it's difficult.
     
  13. CVORNurse

    CVORNurse Well-Known Member

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    I rappelled off a tower at my college once. I was in ROTC at the time. Didn't bound down the side, kinda walked. And I jumped off the high dive board into the deep end of the pool, blindfolded, in BDUs and boots, holding a mock M16.
    But that was in my younger years. My vertigo is so acute now, that I cannot look out the window on the second floor of the hospital without getting nauseated and dizzy.


    ps, I loved ROTC. It is the first place I fired a weapon, M16. I had a burn on my neck for weeks because the cartridge ejected against my neck and went down my shirt, but I loved the experience.
     
  14. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    Sorry that was a typo it was suposed to say 846lb.
     
  15. BizzyB

    BizzyB BucketHunter

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    I admire your chutzpah for giving it a go, but I have to echo the other cautionary voices here on the thread. Rappelling is a heck of a lot of fun and is a gateway activity into climbing, which is also a heck of a lot of fun. It is a sport of mental strength and discipline, balance, grace, and faith in physics. It's a quick way to fly and a quick way to die.

    The most effective safety system you can put in play when you go up rocks or down them is a buddy who knows what he/she is doing. Your buddy is your belay, your belay is your life. Your buddy will check your knots, check your placements, give you the feedback you need to proceed safely, and above all, stand on belay. Don't continue to do this alone. Find a climbing club. Hang out with them. Learn not only what they know, but how they think. How they have each others' backs. Then find a buddy and become a team. Eventually you'll have the skills, equipment, and discipline to solo.

    Every year the American Alpine Club publishes a report called "Accidents in North American Mountaineering" which lists all the climbing and mountaineering accidents that happened in that year along with analysis of what went wrong. Anyone who trusts their life to their ropes should read it -- especially newbies. If your climbing/rappelling group hasn't heard of it, then back away and find another group.

    Also be wary of groups that are primarily gym climbers. The ultra-safe environment of an indoor climbing gym fosters cavalier and sloppy habits that don't translate well in the wild. The real world isn't lined with 3" foam to break your fall. It has sticks and stones that will break your bones.

    So, I know it sounds like I might be raining on your parade. I'm not, I'm encouraging you to do it and do it right and, by right I mean safely. :2thumb:
     
  16. nj_m715

    nj_m715 www.veggear.blogspot.com

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    Still way under what you should use. I have military rope that's rated for 4,500lbs. and it can stretch up to 30% to absorb shock before it breaks. Most civilian stuff is rate much higher. Be careful bro.
     
  17. lexsurivor

    lexsurivor Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the warnings. I should be getting some money soon for some rope rated at 8000lbs for $120.