Do Tinfoil Hats Work?

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by 10101, Apr 18, 2009.

  1. 10101

    10101 Guest

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    Found this article, thought I would share.

    Weekend Diversion: Do Tinfoil Hats Work? : Starts With A Bang

    Do Tinfoil Hats Work?


    So I was looking around the internet the other day, and I came across this scientific study, which -- I kid you not -- is on the effects of tinfoil hats. Tinfoil hat

    [​IMG]

    Now, the whole idea is that you can shield yourself from electromagnetic radiation by protecting your head with tinfoil. And this is true. Kind of. If you cover something in tinfoil completely, the tinfoil will act like a Faraday Cage, and can block electric fields and signals from getting in.

    However, it needs to be covered from all angles in order to make it effective. In other words, a hat simply won't do. You need something closer to this:
    [​IMG]

    But what happens if you actually wear the hat? Can it shield your head from electromagnetic radiation? Or, alternatively, does it tinfoil hat antenna act like an antenna, and actually magnify the signal that you're going to receive?

    Well, this group of MIT grad students hooked up an oscilloscope and measured whether radio signals were blocked or attenuated.

    They found that, pretty much across the board, the change in signal amplitude was less than 10 deciBels, either in the positive or negative direction, for a very small overall change.

    However, there was an interesting thing that happened at just a few frequencies. In particular, at radio frequencies reserved for government use. Care to hazard a guess? Let's quote from the article:

    Using a $250,000 network analyser, we find that although on average all helmets attenuate invasive radio frequencies in either directions (either emanating from an outside source, or emanating from the cranium of the subject), certain frequencies are in fact greatly amplified. These amplified frequencies coincide with radio bands reserved for government use according to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC). Statistical evidence suggests the use of helmets may in fact enhance the government's invasive abilities. We speculate that the government may in fact have started the helmet craze for this reason.

    And they have graphs to back up their claims, too. Check out the reading from the oscilloscope:
    Oscilloscope Measurement

    [​IMG]

    I think the conclusion is pretty clear here. Listen to the music without your tinfoil hat, otherwise the government could influence what you're hearing!
     
  2. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    I remember this guy in the 90's who covered the inside of his trailer in space blankets and listened to a short wave radio all day long.he said the govornment was spying on him with "rays"and the space blankets reflected them....

    He also said he had a microchip in his head......
     

  3. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    What did people say was in their head before the microchip was invented? Did they say there were vaccume tubes in their head?
     
  4. jebrown

    jebrown jebrown

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    Before the microchip thwey were refered to as "Implants". This terminology goes back to the 1930's, maybe even before then.
    Originally the were not implanted by the government but by aliens who had whisked them up into a hovering spaceship.
     
  5. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    Foil really gets attention from the ladies.
     
  6. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    LMMFAO!!!!!!!:D
    Godz,can I use that?:D
     
  7. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    Use it. I had a tube amplifier for my guitar when I was in high school. I liked the way they glowed when it was switched on.
     
  8. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    Me too.looked trippy after a bowl full of herbs.LOL
     
  9. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    My amp exploded after the house next door was hit by lighting. There was all this feedback and it got real loud and then all the tubes exploded.

    At the place next door all their electronics were fried and every lightbulb in the house exploded.
     
  10. Nadine

    Nadine Guest

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    LOL, indeed! :D
     
  11. This is hysterical. Just like something out of Signs :)
     
  12. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    I'll have to make my own tinfoil hat soon. The block the transmissions to my microchip.
     
  13. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    You would have to take apart the front of a microwave and get the sheet of metal with all the tiny holes in it if you want to block certain microwave frequencies ... I wonder if this blocks radio ones also or those new microwave weapons?
     
  14. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    Could you make a microwave weapon out of a normal microwave? Could you just take the door off and point it at someone? It would be heavy and clumsy but I bet being cooked from the inside out would hurt a lot.
     
  15. guyfour

    guyfour Guest

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    Take out the magnetron, put a car battery in a backpack, and hook her up with some jumper cables... then make a handle and cone shaped microwave shielding :D = = Ray Gun????? lol... I have seen some video where someone hooks like 5 magnetrons or whatever they are together on youtube

    Actually I was right you can make it... I found this on youtube

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZmWu31eccY0]YouTube - Homemade Microwave Gun[/ame]
     
  16. Obsidian

    Obsidian Guest

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    aluminum foil does block radio waves

    Aluminum foil (it's not tin) does block radio waves. I don't know all the wavelengths it blocks, but we have used it at work to block ISM band transmissions.

    Lots of substances besides aluminum and tin block radio waves of various wavelengths. Certain species of pine causes some problems for ISM band too.

    ISM band radio bounces off bodies of water. No such luck w/ 2.4 GHz. And of course you know that concrete structures like bridges interfere w/ AM radio but not FM. OTOH, FM does not have nearly the range of AM.
     
  17. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

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    So wear the foil hat under a bridge with a pine tree for maximum effectiveness. Got it!