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There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.
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Since a lot of you folks have older kids you home school I was wondering what type of job preparation/research your kids do. I ask because I have been reading a lot of Machinist's fictions and the show Dirty Jobs has been on as background in the evenings after Roo goes to bed.

Are you trying to make sure your kids have a 'backup plan' aside from prepping should SHTF?
 

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Jack of all trades?
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Our oldest is 14, and he does household chores as well as different types of yard work, and helps with other repair jobs.

I suspect if TSHTF, he'll have a full time job helping all of us stay alive!!

He currently takes part-time college classes, and also whatever skills/trades he can learn from us.
 

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Time Traveler
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I had my first job around age twelve. I did chores well before that. The jobs became more complex and held more responsibility over the years.

I'm guessing that I was around eight when I started cleaning the sawdust and the display cases at my grandparents meat market. That was more in line as a chore than a job. There was certainly no pay unless you count the cheese I sliced off the wheel, the pickles I grabbed out of the wooden barrel, or the steak they put on my black eye.
 

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My son and I discussed contingency plans.

If all goes well, he attends University and earns his Bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering.

If not, he'll turn a wrench at the local garage.

Oh, and he's looking to learn blacksmithing - every boy needs a hobby, doncha know.

Edited to add: I think that's one of the benefits of homeschooling - the public schools (at least around here) try to push everyone into a "white collar" job. I've pointed out to my son that the most fulfilling work is productive work. 90% of all office jobs produce nothing, they just move paper. My son doesn't intend to use his degree to work for someone else, he just wants the knowledge so he can invent things. Working as a mechanic would provide an income, while he spent his spare time inventing Mech suits and other types of robotics :)
 

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I sold my soul to the internet
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We did not home school.
My son is a Eagle Scout, use a chainsaw, ax, garden & landscaping tools.
He works full time in a real Kitchen, not a take out the freezer & fry or cook, then wrap & wait for someone to buy it fast food place.
He has been working part-time, running his on landscaping service, well I drove him the first summer (15 yr), because he did not have SCDLicenses.
But now he pays his own car insurance, gas, oil.
He has bought his own blower, weed eater, He does my lawn for free as long as he live here & pays rent.
He also works in the garden every week, for a few hours.
I still plan to teach him to weld & mill, just because.
He will be twenty this year.
 

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My teenager and toddler forage for herbs with me and help make tinctures and herbal salves. The oldest makes her own concoctions as well, like natural deoderant and bath products, and sews cloth menstrual pads and other sewing projects. We garden, can, and cook as a family. The oldest makes better homemade soups than I do. She likes to write and play guitar, and has been pretty handy with some home remodeling projects.
As far as tv shows, we watch Undercover Boss together and talk about the various jobs. It's a good way to see into the different types of jobs out there.
 

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Forum Newbie
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We homeschooled our boys until 7th grade (10th now) and they have chores around the house and yard, but I don't push much during the school year. During summer break, they split they're time between Grammy's house, where my Sis and BIL have their own shop, and here at home where they are expected to help with the gunsmithing business. They do 'freelance' some yard work and such around the neighborhood to earn a little spending money. They'll be learning machining and welding around my shop, and I won't pressure towards white or blue collar. I spent my time in corporate America and am much happier now, doing what I like.
 

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Supporting Member
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3,312 Posts
We talk to a lot of people - strangers - all the time. Any time we see someone doing a job that seems interesting, we ask. What's it like? How did they get into it? That sort of thing. We are very respectful, and people like to talk about what they do. Heck, a couple times my middle boy got to be a stand-in 'son' for different men we know on 'take your son/daughter to work day'.

There are so many things out there that don't fit into the standard graduate-high-school-go-to-college route. Not that there's anything wrong with going to college (I've got a couple of degrees I've never used myself :rolleyes:) - but it's generally the direction kids are pushed these days, and not necessarily the right path.

But as far as a back-up plan, should the SHTF, I tend to think that teaching them how to work with their hands, teaching them how to handle good physical labor, and teaching them how to think - those are things that will help them no matter what a post SHTF world looks like (IMHO).
 

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Premium Member
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Both my girls left school at about 14.... one because of health issues, the other, well she won't tell me why even all these years later.
By this time they were both running small businesses, helping on the farm and in our horticultural business. They could both cook, sew, garden, butcher, hunt/trap, build, operate machinery etc
The oldest (one with health issues) was herd manager on a dairy farm (800) cows by the age of 16 and was studying at uni part time just for fun. The youngest got part time jobs cleaning and working in a newsagent.
The oldest now lives here on the farm and has a small business, she has been running her own household since she was 16 (on the farm she managed to begin with). The youngest has 3 months to go to finish her degree and has been running her own household since she was 17. I am more than confident that they will do well if things stay the same or mange better than most if things go pear shaped.

I put as many experiences in front of them as possible as they were growing up. I made sure they understood that there are endless ways of getting by in this world. I tried more than anything to give them the tools needed to find their own way. I also taught them to work and be responsible for themselves, IMHO this is the most valuable lesson anyone can teach their children. A love of learning doesn't hurt either :).
 
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