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Never Underestimate The Power Of A Pissed Off Woma
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Ok, I have a question. This is something I don't understand. Why does everyone want diesel vehicles instead of regular gas? Deisel is way higher than regular unleaded. :confused:
 

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Aesops Ant (not Aunt)
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I dont particularly want a diesel but the engines last MUCH longer... perhaps thats why many like them? You also have those that make biodiesel or would like to think they can after SHTF.
 

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Ok, I have a question. This is something I don't understand. Why does everyone want diesel vehicles instead of regular gas? Deisel is way higher than regular unleaded. :confused:
Diesel engines last longer,get better fuel mileage and diesel fuel stores easier than gasoline.
 

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Never Underestimate The Power Of A Pissed Off Woma
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I see, thanks everyone.:)
 

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Don't forget that you do get more torgue. And in 9 out 0f 10 real life situations it's torque,not horsepower that counts. PLus engines are simpler built,easier to work on.
 

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Also dont forget when the shtf diesel will be everywhere such as fire trucks , tractor trailers, farms and farm equiptment, military vehicles etc. so it will be more readily available in abandoned equiptment
 

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Diesel fuel is more expensive at the initial purchase compared to gasoline. Diesel fuel has more energy stored in it, per gallon, so you can travel further on each gallon. This basic analogy assumes all other variables remain fairly constant. Each type of fuel (gas or diesel) has a specific type of engine that is needed.

Diesel engines are built stronger and will last longer than the gasoline counterpart. However, longevity of an engine is really of secondary importance. Durability is also not that much of a factor. The primary reason, for my needs, is the relative safety of diesel fuel.

Gasoline is explosive. One little spark and “Hello Saint Peter”. Diesel fuel is much safer, has a reduced flash point and is far less flammable. Many moons ago my grandfather showed me that he could put out a lit cigarette in diesel fuel and nothing happened. Then he lit up another smoke and tossed it into a partially fill soup can of gas and……..I can still hear the noise and feel the heat.

My cars and trucks are powered with gasoline but I will not utilize gasoline on my boat. The boat is my “home away from home” and I feel safer sleeping directly over 600 gallons of diesel than I would if it were gasoline. This is even more true when then tanks have been depleted.

In a partially filled container of gasoline the gas vapors (the explosive component) take up the “air” space. The safest gas container is a full one because there is no room for vapors. Gasoline vapors can be ignited by a spark (hence the spark plug in your car). Any source of ignition around gasoline vapors is extremely dangerous.

My road vehicles are currently gasoline powered but as they age they will be replaced by diesels. The only real drawback to diesels (other than the soot, smell and noise) is trying to get them to start in cold weather. But for most people, really cold weather is not a common occurrence. Here in Michigan it is a serious factor to contend with.

My tractor is diesel and unless I plug it in during the winter it will stay right were it is until spring. I don’t use the cottage much in the wintertime anyway. Both fuels have disadvantages and advantages for each situation.
 

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Jack of all trades?
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Iused to have a 400M (6.6 liter) gas engine in my F250 pickup. The best I ever got was 13 mpg - once. I usually got around 10 or so MPG.

I swapped in a 3.9 liter turbo Cummins diesel engine from a Doritos truck. I changed NOTHING on the truck but the engine.

Here are the results:
1) Mileage went from 10 MPG to 24 mpg - if I can drive like an old grandpa and keep it down to 50 mph I can get 28 MPG - I got 30 ONCE!
2) I run 10% used motor oil (filtered down to 5 microns) mixed with the diesel fuel, so that is an instant 10% fuel savings.
3) POWER!!!!! Oh my, it CAN pull. The old 400M gas engine would pull a 5,000 lb load on the trailer, but I would have to downshift on a big hill. The diesel doesn't care, it just keeps pulling. I helped my inlaws move, we filled a huge enclosed trailer (had to be over 8,000 lbs easy) and I pulled that thing at 65 MPH down the freeway - with the gas pedal on the floor the WHOLE WAY! I still got 16 MPG!!! The gas engine would have gotten 5-6 MPG.
 

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I would prefer a diesel truck if I could afford it...my grandfather is driving a diesel around right now with almost 600K miles on it. =]
 

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Reverend Coot
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Mileage an durability.

Got a F350 4 door dually what gets much better fuel mileage en my Dodge Dakota!

Diesel averages bout 30 ta 35 cents a gallon more en regular do round these parts.
 

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Thanks, Plowgirl. Didn't know it, but I needed this info, too. DH ALWAYS talks about a diesel, and I just didn't get it. He never explained it quite like this. Ok, so I'm sold - now we need one, too! Who knew? :dunno:
 

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Jack of all trades?
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Thanks, Plowgirl. Didn't know it, but I needed this info, too. DH ALWAYS talks about a diesel, and I just didn't get it. He never explained it quite like this. Ok, so I'm sold - now we need one, too! Who knew? :dunno:
The quality has come and gone over the years.... the old 6.2 liter Chevy V8's were reliable enough, just gutless dogs. No power. the 6.5's were better, but the newer DuraMax engines are world-class. Parts (including filters) are VERY expensive, though. Buy cheap filters and you ruin it.

The older 6.9 Fords are OK, but the 7.3 liter are better. The best of that crop were the 7.3 Powerstrokes. Then came the 6.0 liter powerstroke.....JUNK. I think they worked out their problems and are now a 6.4 or something, but not sure.

Dodge really set the bar when they signed a contract with Cummins. You will be hard pressed to find a better engine for pick-up truck use. I don't like the Dodge chassis so much, but the engines are top-notch. At some point I want to build an F350 with a 5.9 Cummins from a dodge. Then I will have a decent truck with a decent engine.
 

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Reverend Coot
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7.3 fords er great, that international engine is well built, stay away from the newer fords with them variable vane turbo's, everbody round here with one them got nothin but headache.

Cummins be a excellent choice.
 

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7.3 fords er great, that international engine is well built, Cummins be a excellent choice.
Yep. We have one of each. :2thumb:

325,000mi on the '89 Ford and 245,000mi on the '94 Dodge.

Diesel's are long-lived, hard working and easy on fuel when compared to gas. As an added bonus, if there is a disruption in the fuel oil supply lines, you can fill up anywhere you can find a tank of home heating oil. However, doing that now will get you a steep fine if you're caught. There's no road tax on heating oil.
 

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Many moons ago my grandfather showed me that he could put out a lit cigarette in diesel fuel and nothing happened. Then he lit up another smoke and tossed it into a partially fill soup can of gas and……..I can still hear the noise and feel the heat.

It was the half full can of gas and a spark. A cigarette will not light gasoline it take a spark to ignite the fumes. It's the gas fume that burn not the liquid.
Joe-R
 

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I have a Dodge 3500 Cummins and can average 17 mpg , more power then I need but I do love the beast.. I will admit to the idea of selling the truck and replacing it but I've been saying that for 3 years and still haven't put the 4 sale sign up..

It's 1800 miles from here in TX to my other door in MT...with the full bulk tank
( 75 gal ) and the full factory tank I can almost make it without fueling.. with extra fuel cans in back I can make it..

Some how I also feel safer in the big dog.. and that's worth a lot..

I have a buddy who is a diesel mech in MT who works for the local ford dealer , he has two ford diesels and burn nothing but used , filtered tranny fluids and has for years.. he does keep track of his mileage and does pay the road use tax.. well..that's his story and he's sticking to it...lol ..I doubt my Cummins would run on tranny fluid...to up town...lol..as stated in a post above in a tight fix there is a lot of diesel sitting in farm equipment...
 

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I have to agree on the old fords with a 7.3 international. Had one before and it was a mother of a machine--slow but powerfull and hard to destroy. I have a mechanical 5.9 cummins now and it's a better choice in my humble opinion. Diesels are a very emotional thing with a lot of guys lol--you get addicted to the smell and to me that engine rummble is like a lullaby --makes me feel that all is well lol.
 

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Seeking The Truth
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7.3 fords er great, that international engine is well built, stay away from the newer fords with them variable vane turbo's, everbody round here with one them got nothin but headache.

Cummins be a excellent choice.
We have a 1990 7.3 in our school bus,it starts right up.Not much MPG though,about 250 per 35 gal.tank.But it a shorty so its huge and strong,no more beng pushed around on the highway like our sticks and staples.
 

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Diesels are a very emotional thing with a lot of guys lol--you get addicted to the smell and to me that engine rummble is like a lullaby --makes me feel that all is well lol.
You sound like my hubby! Wonder if "she'd" come between us - would I be jealous of a diesel?
 

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Function over Form
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There are few important facts not yet mentioned.

Diesel engines come in naturally aspirated and turbo form. Naturally aspirated means no turbo--just straight air intake like most consumer gasoline engines.

TURBO diesel gives you the high fuel efficiency/power when combined with modern overdrive transmissions. The drawbacks of most modern turbo diesels are the expensive, specialized parts and engine computers. No one knows for sure what effect EMP will actually bave on cars, but engine computers and electronic components may fail.

The older, NATURALLY ASPIRATED engines are also strong and very long lasting (compared to gas engines). They are very simple and no electronics are needed. BUT they are not hugely more fuel efficient. I owned a Ford 6.9L nat asppirated myself and it averaged 12mpg unloaded. My brother is a truck turbo diesel mechanic, and he primarily worked on ambulance fleets.

In the end, you need to consider your needs and choose accordingly. I would think most of us would run out of fuel or break critical parts far before diesel/gas became a real issue. All the above applies to generators as well.
 
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