Dealing with death

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by flowerrosy, Feb 17, 2010.

  1. flowerrosy

    flowerrosy Member

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    Unfortunately a girl I went to high school with died from H1N1 and my friend's mom died from shoveling snow after the recent blizzard. It is difficult for me to grasp, because it seems like after the disaster, everything returns to normal. Yet, we can't bring these people back.
    When I hear about people dying in disasters, most the time it is so far away and I think it's really bad, but that's life. I think when it hits home, it really shocks you. I'm not really "depressed" about it, because I didn't know them closely.
     
  2. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    You can become cold-hearted towards death (like me) or you can let every death hit you hard. No matter how much I prepare to survive whatever comes my way, a heart-attack can still take me when I am shoveling, or a big-rig could slip on some ice and turn me into a pancake during a blizzard or .... death happens and we can either choose to embrace it when it comes or we can choose to fight till the last.

    Because you are here at PS - I would imagine that you would be on the fighter side of the equation.
     

  3. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    After years of personnel tragedy I learned to not let things affect me as much. It's important to recognize it happened but to re-embrace life instead of mourning. I think in emergency situations we will have limited time for mourning. Sorry for your loss all the same.
     
  4. kyfarmer

    kyfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Many have left this world before me and many will leave after me. It is the cycle of life and life ain't fair it's a %100 fact of it. Loosing someone will affect folk's in various ways. Some want to live for ever, i,am not sure the human mind could go half that long without going insane. Death may or may not be the end of it. I do not profess to know the answer to that one. Sorry for your loss. Those who are still here must go on with life.
     
  5. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    I'm sorry for the loss of your aquaintences but as the others have said, it's gonna happen to us all some day. I had that gangrenous gall bladder taken out last fall. Minor surgery and I've been right as rain ever since. In a post SHTF world or some remote area in a third world country it'd have killed me and left my wife with a toddler. I guess I'm saying, and it seems you already are, be thankful for the time we do have with those we love because you never know when the worst will happen. It's been a long time since I've lost anyone unexpectedly but I know the feeling you're talking about. I've lost a few college friends that I didn't keep in daily touch with but it still sucked when it happened.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2010
  6. Ponce

    Ponce Well-Known Member

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    The old man in black and I are old friends.......I have been "dead" three times and three times I was given another chance........the river man wants me to do something before he takes ma across but I don't know what...... yet.
     
  7. kyfarmer

    kyfarmer Well-Known Member

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    Well it happened again yesterday evening. 33 years old i think, i know the family, drug od. He was divorced with 2 kid,s. It has taken more than a few young people here. It's like one after another. Don't think it get's any easier for any one even if it's expected. Someone from the family said they thought this would happen years ago. Kid's now have no dad that's the worse part of it.
     
  8. Jason

    Jason I am a little teapot

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    One of the upper managers at work died suddenly over the weekend. I didn't know him well personally but his death really rocked our company. He was 51 and other than being a smoker he was in perfect health. Had a massive stroke on Saturday with irreprible damage to pretty much everything in his brain above his brainstem and he died Monday afternoon. He left behind 2 teenage boys, a wife, and a group of roughly 130 employees who relied heavily on him to prepare the contracts that keep us working. We'll be fine at work-others will take over. His family will never be the same. Makes ya think.