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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The weeds under foot ... The dandelion is safe and easy to find. :)

There are no poisonous look-alikes... Other very similar Taraxacum species, as well as chicory and wild lettuce only resemble dandelions in the early spring.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taraxacum

From The_Blob ~

Dandelion greens... If you don't treat your lawn, this can be done easily.

From mid-April through mid-May the best for harvesting wild dandelion greens at their young and tender best. Although dandelions can be found throughout most yards, I've discovered that the best ones grow in the wildest of places, safe from the punishing foot traffic of pedestrians and the whir of the lawn mower blade.

As they pine trees bordering my property have grown they've created a fringe forest ecosystem. The soil there is particularly rich due to the accumulation and decomposition of pine needles and windswept autumn leaves. Just enough sunlight passes through for dandelions and other opportunistic plants to thrive.

My thinking is that if the land is prepared to offer up free food in the form of salad greens, mushrooms and berries, one would be silly to refuse. Embraced throughout human history and across cultures and cuisines, the dandelion has been cast as public enemy No. 1 in postwar, suburban America. An estimated 80 million pounds of pesticides are used each year on home lawns to eradicate them. Yet each year, the scrappy plant returns, thumbing its sunny yellow nose.

For me, letting dandelions grow wild and pesticide-free in my yard is not just about frugality and ecology, but also gastronomy. They also serve as a useful reminder that good foods are closer than we may think, even as close as our own back yard.
All parts of the dandelion are edible and have medicinal and culinary uses. It has long been used as a liver tonic and diuretic. In addition, the roots contain inulin and levulin, starchlike substances that may help balance blood sugar, as well as bitter taraxacin, which stimulates digestion. Dandelion roots can be harvested during any frost-free period of the year and eaten raw, steamed, or even dried, roasted and ground into a coffee substitute. The flowers are best known for their use in dandelion wine, but they also can be added to a salad, made into jellies or dipped in batter to make dandelion fritters. The leaves are rich in potassium, antioxidants, and vitamins A and C. Dandelion greens can be eaten raw, steamed, boiled, sautéed or braised. For use in salads, greens should be harvested from new plants while still small and tender, before the first flower emerges. Larger greens tend to be tougher and more bitter, and better suited for cooking.

Recipes in the link ...

http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f36/almost-unknown-edibles-1002/

What are uses for dandelion?

http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f36/what-uses-dandelion-6182/

Dandelion Wine

http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f78/dandelion-wine-10417/
 

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Dandelion blossom fritters, I make them with a simple tempura batter. The greens are great in a mixed salad. Two of my favorite ways to use them.
 

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This is why I stand on my deck, look across my yellow dotted lawn (only one on the block) and smile....that's lunch growing out there! Not only do I have dandelions, but chamomile, clover, wild strawberries, sorrel, and plantain.

Awesome post. Thanks!
 

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*Andi said:
The weeds under foot ... The dandelion is safe and easy to find. :)

There are no poisonous look-alikes... Other very similar Taraxacum species, as well as chicory and wild lettuce only resemble dandelions in the early spring.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taraxacum

From The_Blob ~

Dandelion greens... If you don't treat your lawn, this can be done easily.

From mid-April through mid-May the best for harvesting wild dandelion greens at their young and tender best. Although dandelions can be found throughout most yards, I’ve discovered that the best ones grow in the wildest of places, safe from the punishing foot traffic of pedestrians and the whir of the lawn mower blade.

As they pine trees bordering my property have grown they’ve created a fringe forest ecosystem. The soil there is particularly rich due to the accumulation and decomposition of pine needles and windswept autumn leaves. Just enough sunlight passes through for dandelions and other opportunistic plants to thrive.

My thinking is that if the land is prepared to offer up free food in the form of salad greens, mushrooms and berries, one would be silly to refuse. Embraced throughout human history and across cultures and cuisines, the dandelion has been cast as public enemy No. 1 in postwar, suburban America. An estimated 80 million pounds of pesticides are used each year on home lawns to eradicate them. Yet each year, the scrappy plant returns, thumbing its sunny yellow nose.

For me, letting dandelions grow wild and pesticide-free in my yard is not just about frugality and ecology, but also gastronomy. They also serve as a useful reminder that good foods are closer than we may think, even as close as our own back yard.
All parts of the dandelion are edible and have medicinal and culinary uses. It has long been used as a liver tonic and diuretic. In addition, the roots contain inulin and levulin, starchlike substances that may help balance blood sugar, as well as bitter taraxacin, which stimulates digestion. Dandelion roots can be harvested during any frost-free period of the year and eaten raw, steamed, or even dried, roasted and ground into a coffee substitute. The flowers are best known for their use in dandelion wine, but they also can be added to a salad, made into jellies or dipped in batter to make dandelion fritters. The leaves are rich in potassium, antioxidants, and vitamins A and C. Dandelion greens can be eaten raw, steamed, boiled, sautéed or braised. For use in salads, greens should be harvested from new plants while still small and tender, before the first flower emerges. Larger greens tend to be tougher and more bitter, and better suited for cooking.

Recipes in the link ...

http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f36/almost-unknown-edibles-1002/

What are uses for dandelion?

http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f36/what-uses-dandelion-6182/

Dandelion Wine

http://www.preparedsociety.com/forum/f78/dandelion-wine-10417/
Thanks for the info.
 

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I tried making Dandelion Jelly this past spring. It never jelled enough so we called the liquid Syrup instead and had it on pancakes all summer and fall. Just ran out last month and can't wait until spring... I plan on making about twice as much this upcoming year.
 

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I used too kill my weed but this year I graze on them.

My new love is mushrooms. I have a laminated guide, and still follow the rule of , when in doubt, doubt its it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Basic Tea

Basic dandelion flower tea

Collect a handful of dandelion flowers

Rince

Remove petals from base of flower and place in cup/tea pot

Add boiling water and steep 3 ta 5 minutes.

Add honey to taste (if you wish)

drink :)

Basic dandelion leaf tea

Collect dandelion leaves... younger & smaller leaves are best

Rince and dry (I use my excalibur)

I store mine in a glass jar (out of sunlight)

I use 1 teaspoon per cup

steep 5 minutes and add a lemon, lime or orange slice (if you wish)

As always ... Allergies are rare but you can do a check first. When working with any new herb, I only drink 1/4 cup to see how "my body" reacts.
 

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I've found on hiking trips into the BOB that the pack horses have transplanted these dandelions by natures effect, into the back country along the trails. I know that these dandelions are safe to eat as they have not been sprayed with herbicides. Use caution in consuming any natural plants unless you have lived on that prop for at least two seasons. The Monsanto poison know as "Roundup" has a long life in soil and plants can pull this poison into the plants several years after the initial application, as well as other herbicides. Also be aware of drift from uneducated neighbors attempting to control what they see as a blight upon their properties.

Dandelions also contain some of natures healing and preventative properties. Dandelions have one of the highest concentrations of Vit C, greater than the vegetables you buy at your local grocery.

The cure for every ailment know to man has been provided by the nature, we just have to be willing to seek it.
 

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Ever since I read one of these threads last year I just started picking the flowers and eating them straight off the plant. Kinda bitter. I'll have to try that tea next year!
Maybe I'll even try the wine.
 

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Ever since I read one of these threads last year I just started picking the flowers and eating them straight off the plant. Kinda bitter. I'll have to try that tea next year!
Maybe I'll even try the wine.
Go for the syrup/jelly if you like sweet.
 

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Ever since I read one of these threads last year I just started picking the flowers and eating them straight off the plant. Kinda bitter. I'll have to try that tea next year!
Maybe I'll even try the wine.
You're the first to mention the 'bitterness factor' of dandelion (and many other wild greens). I know of only two ways to deal with this bitterness, pour off the first boiling water, or, blanch the plant during it's growing stage; OK, maybe a third way is to add enough sugar to overwhelm the bitterness.
 

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Dandelions: name for the long teeth like root, not the yellow ball flower for the lion's mane as I was lead to believe as a child.
The young greens are good with scrambled eggs. You get more C if you eat them raw.
I have lots of poke here, but Collard are so easy to grow why bother with seasonal greens.
 

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Because in a survival situation you may not have Collards to eat, and may have to rely on seasonal greens. If a person is not used to foraging or eating wild foods, there could be a mental or physical turn off that may prevent you from eating some thing that could save your life.
 

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Camo, I have done the forging thing & taught Scout how to live when lost in the woods & what not to eat.
I can carry collard seeds to plant enough green for 20 people year around in a pill bottle.
I have collards that are 4 years old & need picking now.
I have dandelions for the vitamin C, but if you prepare your garden as well as your dry goods,then the vitamins & 17 elements will be in your grown food.
I know I can not take my garden with me if I have to move, but 500 pounds of beans & rice will be hard to put in a back pack.
So we need to known the the short comings of each storage system.
By the way 90% of the wild plant will grow in the garden too.
I just do not eat poke, because it has a short season, the red/pink color means it is too old to eat & is now poison to humans, that is way I will eat collards as long as I can.
 

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I have dug up many dandelion roots for rabbits. I should be doing it and drying them for tea we have tons in our one acre plot (I just won't in the fenced area where the chickens roam :eek: ). Down the road someone had a huge hedge of old fashioned roses and each fall they have massive amounts of rose hip, huge orange ones, I was feeling too shy to stop and ask for some, should have, but will have to get my nerve up next year.

Around here, in the apex of the big leaf maple trees there is a fern that grows called "licorice fern". Thus named because if you pull it out, clean off the outer skin and chew on it, it tastes like black licorice. Used in teas are good for colds and sore throats, and some people swear for stomach upset too.

I need to make myself even more familiar with more local edible greens, some people actually will buy them from people in local farmers markets and they spend tons of money on it, if they only realized they were free. We also have a lot of mushrooms that people will pay a lot for here, but I will not do this till I can take the time with and experienced guide, it can be so dangerous if you get the wrong ones, there are look alikes and sometimes they are deadly.
 

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Dandelion is very easy, but if you eat too much of it it will hurt your stomach. my advice to you would be to get together with your local a biologist, or nature center representative who has common knowledge of the plants with in your area. Be careful when you do these wild edible searches, because without proper caution you could make yourself very ill. Be safe.
 

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