Cuts of beef?

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by mdprepper, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. mdprepper

    mdprepper I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...

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    I need to get more ground beef for the freezer. Maybe even some for canning (now that I know I can use my pressure canner on my stove top:D) My local grocery store has ground beef on sale for $2.49 per lb:eek: But they do have "top round London broil" on sale for $1.79 per lb. Would top round be a good choice to grind for hamburgers? Would it be a good choice for canning (in bite sized pieces) for stews?:scratch
     
  2. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    Most American butchers will label a cut of meat "London Broil"... this is incorrect as the term does not refer to a cut of meat, but actually a method of preparation and cooking. The cut of meat traditionally used is flank steak, but in recent years butchers have erroneously labeled top round roast/steak as London Broil. Because the muscle fibers run the entire length of this cut, the meat can be tough if not tenderized via pounding or massaging. Scoring, stabbing, cutting, penetrating, or otherwise mutilating the cut before sending it into the broiler results in a tougher finished product as it allows all the desirable juices to run out of the meat into the pan.

    The preparation of London broil typically involves marinating the meat for several hours followed by high heat searing in an oven broiler or outdoor grill. In both heating methods the meat is placed approximately three inches from a direct heat source and turned several times to promote even cooking and avoid burning. It is then served in thin slices, cut across the grain.

    I don't see any reason why you couldn't grind or cube & can this meat, it would definitely have a lower fat content. The canning process would act as a long term marinade so the traditional issues of the meat's "toughness" wouldn't apply.

    good luck :2thumb:
     

  3. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    As long as you're not paying for a lot of bone, you'd come out ahead.
     
  4. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    most of the meat cutters I know do a "London Broil" as a boneless cut :beercheer:
     
  5. mdprepper

    mdprepper I sold my soul to The_Blob. He had candy...

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    Yes, the ones on sale are boneless.:congrat:

    Thanks for the advice.

    We tend to use more chicken (thighs usually) then any other meat here at home. So I am not really familiar with the different cuts of beef and what they are "good" for. I buy thighs on average for .69-.89 per lb., but the cost of beef and pork just keep going up and up. The $1.79 is the lowest beef cost I've seen for awhile.
     
  6. Clarice

    Clarice Well-Known Member

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    I always buy the less expensive cuts for canning. These cuts after canning are always fork tender. We ground our own venison for canning to be used in chili or speghetti or tacos. But tonight we are canning ground beef bought on sale for $1.59#. I bought 20#, this should yeild 2 canners full or 14 qts.
     
  7. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    Clarice, London Broil is our favorite cut for canning as cubes. Since, as Blob said, it tends to be tough, it holds together well during the canning process but is tender when done.

    If you cut them in smaller cubes, they make great "meat balls" for spag just by simmering them for a short time in your sauce.
     
  8. Meerkat

    Meerkat Seeking The Truth

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    I read to get the meat up to 185 degrees before putting it into jard.Do you agree with this?
    They have london broil and round steak both on sale now.i will use quarts and only have one canner 7 qt.s at a time.
     
  9. OldCootHillbilly

    OldCootHillbilly Reverend Coot

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    Ifin yall gettin beef fer those prices yall best buy as much as ya can. We ain't had beef here under 2.89 a pound fer quite a spell. Nothin fer sales either.

    Now ifin ya wanna do pork, how much they gettin a pound fer butts? I can get the sliced ones fer 1.89 pound which be cheaper then whole butts. I know it don't make no sense, but be the way it be. Ifin ya wanna can it, I cook em (smoke em) ta 165° at a cookin temp a 225° = 250° with the 165 bein the internal temp. Let em cool overnight in the fridge, cut inta cubes an then warm up an hot pack an can as normal.

    Mighty good eatin. The lower temp fer the butts will let em hold tagether better durin the cannin process an yet keep em safe.
     
  10. Meerkat, I think 185 degrees is a bit over the top. They suggest getting pork and chicken to an internal heat of 165 degrees before serving in order to kill trichinosis and salmonella respectively. Solid cuts of beef can be eaten rare. Ground beef can too, but then you rum the risk of getting E. coli.
     
  11. Meerkat

    Meerkat Seeking The Truth

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    Thanks Blair,I read somewhere that it is advised to cook it to a certain temp before putting it in the jars now.I forgot what they said the temp was:confused:.
     
  12. Some people are pressure canning raw meats. The understanding is that the high pressure and head will kill all bacteria/viruses.
     
  13. CrackbottomLouis

    CrackbottomLouis Winston Smith Sent Me

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    Thats a good cut for jerky. Take a quarter of it and make yourself a treat. :)
     
  14. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    Meerkat, we like to lightly brown meat cubes at a fairly high heat in olive oil before putting it in the jar. It seems to enhance the flavor and it helps to prevent the meat from eroding in the jar, leaving meat sediment at the bottom. Looks a little unsavory.