Corproate Preppers

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by UncleJoe, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

    6,764
    108
    Came across this article tonight and thought it was worth sharing. The full story can be read here.

    Kroger storm watchers prepare 24/7

    In a non-descript Blue Ash office building, Kroger associates work around the clock to track bad weather forming from Anchorage to Atlanta...

    They're looking for mudslides in Washington State, forest fires in California, tornados in Kansas, hurricanes in Texas, ice storms in the Southeast.

    Today, it's a snowstorm right here at home.

    At the earliest signs of any natural disaster, Kroger associates begin a detailed process of preparing stores, distribution centers, manufacturing facilities, truck fleets and store employees to make Kroger's response to a storm as unnoticeable to customers as possible.

    Sophisticated weather tracking is crucial for the nation's largest grocer. Wind, storms and wild weather can force stores to lose electricity and products to spoil. It can shut down manufacturing or distribution facilities and run trucks full of goods off the road. It can compromise people's safety. And it can cost millions of dollars in losses.

    "The bottom line is they're neighborhood grocers, and the people that surround them are counting on them to have a good, safe, adequate food supply," said Tom Jackson, president and CEO of the Ohio Grocers Association.

    Kroger's planning begins in its Systems Control Centers, the largest of which is in Blue Ash. Television screens delivering the latest weather news from around the country are paired with a huge map of the United States. Plotted on the map are each of Kroger's 2,461 stores, its 40 food processing plants and 34 distribution centers. And overlaying the map are images from the latest Doppler radar.

    Wednesday, it showed a storm cloud that could cover the region with 4-6 inches of snow Thursday.

    Planning typically begins several days before a storm, Bruni said, as Kroger merchandisers notify suppliers of the likelihood of increased orders for milk, bread, meat, eggs, rock salt, cereal and shovels.

    Locally, Kroger's division checks the status of its dry foods distribution facility in Woodlawn to be sure it's ready to serve any of the region's 110 stores, where customers will stock up before a storm. Backup resources could come from nearby centers in Louisville, Columbus or Roanoke, Va.

    Bigger orders for milk and bread are then made to Kroger's dairy and bakery near Indianapolis and for meat, frozen foods and perishable items from Shelbyville, Ind.

    At the store level, Kroger managers begin reworking schedules to staff up for the day before the storm, when customers typically flock to the grocery, said Cal Oeters, manager of the Newport Kroger.

    Dozens of staffers scheduled to work Thursday came in a day early to move rock salt, ice scrapers and windshield wiper fluid to the front of the store. They then ran all 11 checkout lanes, stocked shelves and worked the meat department throughout the day. Many of those workers will be off on Thursday when crowds will be light, Oeters said.
     
  2. bstickler92

    bstickler92 Well-Known Member

    65
    0
    i knew i liked kroger! that's where i go for all my groceries because it's a short walk from the dorms here.
     

  3. Sonnyjim

    Sonnyjim Prepping

    158
    0
    It's good that even though they're a big chain they still consider themselves small town grocers. It's a good mindset to have, as I'm sure that's where they started off back in the day.
     
  4. Clarice

    Clarice Well-Known Member

    983
    1
    I always liked Kroger's. A lot of people may think this was free advertizing for them. But I feel it is good to know they are trying to keep things going in bad times. With all the comments posted after the article I wonder what would have been said if Kroger like many other retailers didn't bother to make sure you had what you needed and just shut their doors???????
     
  5. tsrwivey

    tsrwivey Supporting Member

    3,243
    81
    That's really neat! I never really thought about exactly how a grocery store prepares for a storm.
     
  6. PamsPride

    PamsPride edirPsmaP

    1,587
    7
    We do not have any Kroger's around here! Bummer!
     
  7. efbjr

    efbjr Well-Known Member

    260
    1
    Other corporate preppers?

    I read that Walgreen's Drug had stockpiled 3 months of pharmaceuticals prior to Y2K, just in case. Don't know what they are doing now. :confused:
     
  8. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

    4,350
    22
    In the west, Kroger's is called "Smith's". Smith's is owned by the Kroger company, and they have grocery stores in other parts of the country called something other than Kroger or Smith's.

    According to Wikipedia, the Kroger company's subsidaries are:
    Baker's (Nebraska)
    Bell Markets and Cala Foods (California)
    City Market (Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, New Mexico)
    Dillons (Kansas, Missouri)
    Food 4 Less and Foods Co. (Los Angeles, California; San Diego, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Portland, Oregon; Chicago, Illinois; NW Indiana)
    including Hispanic format and Food 4 Less Carniceria
    Fred Meyer (Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington)
    Fred Meyer Marketplace (Alaska, Oregon, Washington)
    Fred Meyer Northwest Best (Oregon, Washington)
    Fred Meyer Jewelers (Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Utah, Washington, Nebraska, Oregon, Texas)
    Littman Jewelers
    Barclay Jewelers
    Fox's Jewelers
    Fry's Food and Drug (Arizona)
    Fry's Marketplace (Arizona)
    Fry's Mercado (Arizona)
    Fry's Signatures (Arizona)
    Gerbes (Missouri)
    Hilander (Illinois)
    JayC Food Stores (Indiana)
    King Soopers (Colorado, Wyoming)
    Fresh Fare by King Soopers (Colorado)
    Kroger Food and Drug (Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Texas, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana)
    Kroger Marketplace (Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Texas, and now Arkansas)
    Kroger Signature Stores (Texas, Indiana)
    Fresh Fare by Kroger (Ohio, Michigan, Georgia, Texas)
    Kwik Shop (Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska)
    Loaf 'N Jug (Colorado, Nebraska, North Dakota, Wyoming)
    Owen's Market (Indiana)
    Pay Less Food Markets (Indiana)
    Quality Food Centers (Oregon, Washington)
    QFC Fresh Fare
    Quik Stop (California, Nevada)
    Ralphs (California)
    Ralphs Marketplace
    Ralphs Fresh Fare
    Scott's Food & Pharmacy (Indiana)
    Smith's Food and Drug (Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming)
    Smith's Marketplace (Utah)
    Turkey Hill (Pennsylvania, Ohio)

    I have two kids that work for the company, and the company treats them very well. They get a fair wage and good benefits, good working conditions, and have a good corporate structure. And I don't get anything for saying that! :D
     
  9. MrSfstk8d

    MrSfstk8d Well-Known Member

    207
    0
    Worked for Kroger years ago. Pretty good place to work. It's a union shop, so that was the only down side, lol. Best freind still works there, management now. Almost 20 years, I think.
     
  10. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

    4,350
    22
    My kids work for Smith's, which like I said, is owned by Kroger. And it's not union at their store. That would be a down side, if they were. Safeway is the only union grocery store around here, that I know of.