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There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.
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There seems to be a lot of talk about how our society doesn't know how to cook anymore and majority of meals are from the local drive thru. Society repeats to themselves "it is easier to go to (-insert fast food addiction here-) than cook my own food!" I know most of us here don't follow that mantra but by not teaching our kids to cook we contribute to the problem.

I want to start a collection here of recipes and teaching ideas to encourage this 'new fangled idea'!

http://www.kids-cooking-activities.com/kids-cooking-lessons.html
 

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It took me 20 years of experimentation to finally figure out the not so secret, secret ingredient to my grandma's rabbit sauce.

I never use a recipe that requires measuring. I don't even own a measuring cup or spoons, it is all by taste and feel. I remember grandma measuring by hand using the size of the pile in her palm as a guide.

I think experimentation is the key to them learning. With me being single it was either learn to cook or go hungry.... LOL
 

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What a great idea and a fantastic website you found ! Wish I lived closer to my G-grandkids to watch them learn like this. Guess their parents will have all the fun this time.


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There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What a great idea and a fantastic website you found ! Wish I lived closer to my G-grandkids to watch them learn like this. Guess their parents will have all the fun this time.
I want to incorporate cooking into my home school lesson plans as early as I can. :) Roo got a play cookset for her birthday. She LOVES it. I already have child-sized real utensils for her when she is older.

But here is an easy recipe I found. Perfect for the budding culinary...

http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/salsa-chicken-soup

Salsa Chicken Soup

Ingredients
  • ½ pound boneless skinless chicken breasts, cubed
  • 14oz. chicken broth
  • 1 ¾ cups water
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 cup corn
  • 1 cup salsa
  • cheese optional

Directions
  1. In a large saucepan, combine the chicken, broth, water and chili powder.
  2. Bring to a boil.
  3. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
  4. Add corn; return to a boil.
  5. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink and corn is tender.
  6. Add salsa and heat through.
  7. Garnish with cheese if desired.
 

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Nice idea. I’ve been lending a hand recently at my daughter’s home, and my 10 yr. old grandson (who is a true ‘foodie’) and I decided it would be fun for him to plan a meal and cook one day a week (course I am his Sous-chef). After doing his own research (gramma’s and mom’s recipe files) he’s planned his own menus and has succeeded in making three great meals for his family with a keen eye to their’s and his tastes.

His first meal was marinated steak, roast potatoes, a side of seasoned rice, and garden salad. His second menu consisted of a three cheese spinach dip appetizer served with toasted pita bread, a salsa cheese dip (he incorporated his mom’s home-made salsa), and a nacho bake made with more cheese (he loves cheese), beef, green onion, jalapeno, green/red peppers and tomato.

For his third meal (he was feeling mighty confident at this stage) he made his mom’s favorite dish - a chicken alfredo penne dish with a side of caesar salad (made own croutons) and Calabraise bread.

There’s no turning back - he’s just a whirling dervish in the kitchen now.

Because he has a real interest in cooking, and some experience, these recipes were age appropriate for him.

The alfredo recipe is the easiest - posted below:

FETTUCCINE ALFREDO (OR PENNE)
INGREDIENTS

12 oz fettuccine
3 cups broccoli
1 cup grated (fresh) Parm - we had some fresh Romao on hand so we threw some in
1 cup whipping cream
1/4 cup butter
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Pinch of nutmeg

PREP
In large pot of boiling salted water, cook pasta for 6 minutes. Add broccoli; cook until pasta is tender but firm and broccoli is tender-crisp, about 2 minutes. Drain well and return to pot.
Meanwhile, in saucepan, bring whipping cream and butter just to boil. Reduce heat and stir in Parmesan cheese, salt, pepper and nutmeg; add to pasta and toss to coat.

To add the chicken to the recipe just slice thin strips from two breasts, saute in a couple tblsp. olive oil, season lightly with garlic and add to pasta once sauce in and toss.
 

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I had each of the four kids list their top 10 favorite meals, sides included, then taught them how to make each one. We started with the easiest thing then graduated to the harder things. I brought my kids up under foot in the kitchen where the babes played with pots & spoons & the older ones stood on their step stools helping. When there were four, they took turns at being breakfast helper, lunch helper, & dinner helper. Those four are now grown but our 18 month old has sat on the countertop since he could sit independently. He helps wash fruits & veggies, plays in the soap bubbles in the sink, plays with the utensils, learns vocabulary like "hot" & "hurt", watches everything going on.
 

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Grimm we are on the same page :) My 4 yr old stepdaughter got her cooking play set at 2 yrs old. Helped me start making jelly and jam at 2 (she now knows all the steps by herself) and pulls the chair over to help me at lunch and dinner. Her bday (when she officially turns 4) is in December and my mom found a great book called "play soup" It is a cookbook with real recipes made into kid terms and pictures. She's getting an apron and chef hat too. If you get kids involved and having fun making their food, the more interested they are in eating and trying new things.
 

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That right - start young. My youngest grandaughter 18 months sits on my hip and/or the counter when prepping in the kitchen. She has her own mini rolling pin, pots, pans and other utensils as well. Cooking just comes second nature when they start young.

One of my grandaughters (five at the time) and I were making a cake batter one day, and as I was breaking eggs off of the side of the batter bowl she graciously corrected my technique and advised me that her mom showed her that the eggs should be broken on the counter to avoid getting any shells in the bowl. Lesson learned :D

Good idea to have the kids list the top 10 faves!
 

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The Future?
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Johnnycakes..:D
 

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Grimm, love that link! This is one area where I'm really behind. We'll remedy that come January (we'll be doing a unit study in school using this). I'll definitely incorporate the site you posted, too - thanks! :kiss:
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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Sometimes the simplest recipes are the best for teaching children how to measure the ingredients, mix them together and then cook them (but be careful with the heat).

Pancakes are great as they don't take long to whip up (meaning that the little ones do not get bored with it quickly) and they get to eat their masterpiece right away.

Here is a picture of my grandson (he was about 3years old in this picture) with a hand egg-beater getting set for the next step in making pancakes with "poppa" ...
 

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