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I’ve gone through the forums and I’ve never heard a discussion about this. Here is my question;
If the city water management were to go down, Would the waste pipes just naturally flow to wherever they go? Or is it possible they would
backup into our tubs and toilets? We have all had this happen at some point. And we’ve paid a plumber to make it go away. This is something that no-one has talked about as far as I’ve seen on any prepared sites. Has anyone thought about this or lived through a situation where this city water was shut off?
I have bought a water shut-off tool. But I think that just covers city water coming INTO your house. I don’t think there is a switch for waste water.
Sorry to be vulgar, but shit invading our houses is a health nightmare that I’m not ready for..... Yet.
This is something I need clarity on.
Anyone?
 

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We've had problems here with rusty water creeping up the drain pipes and almost making a huge mess when it rains too much and does something to the sewer drains, so you can only imagine how much worse things will be when everything shuts down. You might be able to have a valve installed on your sewer pipes to prevent backflow.
 

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Reverend Coot
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If the waste handlin process be halted, yup it gonna come back to ya. It'll come in at the lowest point first, typically a floor drain er whatever be the lowest point. Ya can get floor drain plugs what folk use fer such purpose. As fer tubs an toilets, well not much ya can do cept unhook from city sewer. I have heard they got some sort a valve what can be installed now case a floods an such, but don't know nothin bout em.

Talk with a good repuatable plumber, they may know the solution.
 

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I've gone through the forums and I've never heard a discussion about this. Here is my question;
If the city water management were to go down, Would the waste pipes just naturally flow to wherever they go? Or is it possible they would
backup into our tubs and toilets? We have all had this happen at some point. And we've paid a plumber to make it go away. This is something that no-one has talked about as far as I've seen on any prepared sites. Has anyone thought about this or lived through a situation where this city water was shut off?
I have bought a water shut-off tool. But I think that just covers city water coming INTO your house. I don't think there is a switch for waste water.
Sorry to be vulgar, but shit invading our houses is a health nightmare that I'm not ready for..... Yet.
This is something I need clarity on.
Anyone?
most modern lines have a one way ck valve in them that lets the waste go only one way
 

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I worked at a hospital in Seattle that had a sewage flood.
We called it a "Code Brown".
A 12" sewer line outside the hospital got plugged.
The raw sewage exploded up the toilets,sinks and floor drains.
There was a 6" wave of brown sludge flowing down the hall in X-Ray.
The force was strong enough that sewage hit the ceiling.
The smell made you gag and your eyes water.
The city sent a truck to vacuum up the solids and as much water as they could get and the rest of the clean up was our problem.
The city said it was an act of God so they weren't responsible.
Lawyer fought it out for months. Not sure who eventually won.
Everything in X-Ray had to be removed and cleaned.
Including the walls.
It took about 3 months as best I remember.
All workers had to wear has-mat gear and there was no air conditioning in the department.
I would quit before I ever get involved in something like that again.
I have heard stories of it happening in apartment buildings also.
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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If you are located at the "high-side" of the sewage issue, you probably will not have any flow into the lower sections of your house. If you are located at the low-side, you can have one-way valves installed that will automagically block the back-flow (known as a back-flow check valve).

Back-flow check-valves can be installed on any liquid-pipes - fresh-water pipes coming into your house and black-water pipes for the sewage leaving. What the check-valve will do for the fresh-water is if there is a pressure-drop, it will not back-flow into the water-grid sucking the life-giving water from your pipes / hot-water-heater ..
 

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Rookie Prepper
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[Temporary thread Hijack]

On a somewhat related note, especially if you have city water.

If you have your own sewer system that has a pump/ejector pump as part of the flow to get your sewage out to your leach bed, be careful when the power is out.

If you have a well and septic, no problem. If you can't pump water in, you don't have to pump it out on the sewer side. If you fire up your genset and power your well, make sure you also get power to the sewer pump.

If you have city water, you have plenty of water in but without power to your sewer pump, if you use water, it'll fill your tanks. I doubt it'll back-flow out your toilet but it'll go somewhere. If you've had a pump go out on you in the past, you already know where you're going to have issues.

[/Temporary thread Hijack]
 

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I am a little teapot
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I have a gravity flow septic system/leach bed. While public lines backing up are really not my problem, it's important to keep an eye on your septic system too because if THAT backs up you get the same problem and it really is all yours to deal with. Thankfully (knock on wood) mine's been relatively trouble free. We did have to redo the leach bed about 10 years ago ut that's pretty much been it.
 

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This is a very good thread, not all of us live in the country and depend on city services. Rev Coot is right, it a law of nature, "water seeks the lowest point". Maybe your house of someone across town. When the pumps stop, the lines will fill. So glad you posted this, I need to check on a butterfly valve or something to stop the back flow coming back into the house.
Ya know, no question is without SOME consideration and I find this question a very good one...Jack
 

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If you know where your city sewer system is located, you should be able to follow the main roads towards it. Count the lift stations if any between you and the sewer plant. The lift stations are located where the sewage has to be "lifted" to contiune "downhill". If their are more than a few, it will back up on you before too long.

The condition and age of the pipes have a good bit to do with it also.

Jimmy
 

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I have a gravity flow septic system/leach bed. While public lines backing up are really not my problem, it's important to keep an eye on your septic system too because if THAT backs up you get the same problem and it really is all yours to deal with. Thankfully (knock on wood) mine's been relatively trouble free. We did have to redo the leach bed about 10 years ago ut that's pretty much been it.
Our county allows a separate grey water leach line from the septic tank leach line, as long as your perk test is good. It makes a world of difference.

Jimmy
 

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Hmmmm ... I don't know where I live in relation to the plant here, but I'll be finding out ... Thanks for the thread! I don't know that I would have ever considered this if I had been left to my own devices ... :scratch
 
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