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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
but... but... Christians committed attrocities too!... :rolleyes:

(700+ YEARS ago, the 9th crusade ended in 1272)

then a few of things called The Rennaissance, The Reformation, and The Industrial Revolution happened...

somebody please remind me, how many muslims have been killed in America (and the kilers been sanctioned) just for being muslims?

JUST SUCK IT, politically correct moral/social relativists :mad:
 

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performing monkey
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4,230 Posts
We're being intentionally misled by the media, by political pundits and by the Obama administration about the upheaval in the Middle East. Many, many commentators, spokespeople, and bought-and-paid-for 'experts' would like us to believe that the turmoil is an unequivocally good thing. But revolutions are always dangerous, and almost impossibly difficult to control. Think of the revolutions (and their subsequent fallout) in Russia, Cuba, China and Iran for starters.

When tremendous events move so quickly, as they have in North Africa and the Middle East over the past month, we struggle to make sense of it all. We try to give it all some meaning, we try to find historical analogies, and we try to find the right words to define, even if it's just to ourselves, what we're seeing. One of the words that journalists like CNN's Anderson Cooper and The New York Times' Tom Friedman casually toss around when trying to find motivation for Arab unrest is "democracy"--as in pro-democracy movement.

But are we seeing an Arab pro-democracy movement? I don't really know, but probably not. First, it seems that it's only Westerners who are describing the events in Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia, Morocco and Libya as a democracy movement. But when you hear animated Arabs on the street talking, they are more often expressing rage at their rulers rather than any yearning for democracy.

But even when cries for democracy do come from these popular new Arab freedom fighters, what do they really mean? Here's a very quick recap of Dr. Fears' (Professor of Classics at the university of Oklahoma) comments on NPR's Weekend Edition with Scott Simon.

Simon: Is democracy a universal human value?

Fears: No democracy is not. It is not a native value in the Middle East, it is not a native value in the historical civilization of China, it is not a native value in the historical civilization of India. It developed in Greece, and no people have ever had a true democracy who were not touched in some way by the genius of the Greeks... Many people in many places at many times have chosen the perceived security of a strong ruler--an authoritarian ruler, even a despotic ruler--over the awesome responsibility of self-government. That has historically been the choice in the Middle East, that is to say autocracy, since the birth of civilization in the Middle East, in Iraq and Egypt 5,000 years ago.

Simon: But at this point in the 21st century, what do we make of cries for democracy?

Fears: Cries for democracy are generally a subterfuge for simply a change in government... cries for democracy can simply be a desire to have a 'legitimate' form for a totalitarian government."
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The sort of authoritarian, even dictatorial regimes, that rule most of the countries in the modern Islamic Middle East, are a modern creation, the pre-modern regimes were much more open, much more tolerant. And I think that the root of these protest movements sweeping across the region is the Arab peoples' widespread sense of injustice, which seems to have been inordinately misdirected, by the various Powers That Be in the region, towards Israel as a means of offering a convenient 'other' (scapegoat) as a target.

A mad dash to overnight Western-style elections, far from representing a solution to the region's difficulties, would just be a dangerous aggravation of the problem, and I fear that the most radical of the Islamo-fascist movements are already best placed to exploit so misguided a move. A much better course seems to be to encourage the gradual development of local, self-governing institutions, in accordance with the well-documented Islamic tradition of "consultation."

Also, I don't think it was a coincidence that the current unrest erupted first in Tunisia, the one Arab country where women play a significant part in public life. The role of women in determining the future of the Arab world will be crucial, and I have found that there are worse things in life than considering the female perspective.
 
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