Prepared Society Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Member
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am homeschooling my 8 yr old and we're using Saxon math right now, primarily because that's what the public school uses. We weren't sure if she would be ready to go back to public or not, so we just chose to stick with what they use. So anyway, we've decided to to keep homeschooling her and I was wondering about changing the math curriculum. Saxon worksheets are SO DULL!! I think my daughter would like something a more colorful and interesting, but I'm a little worried about changing to a new curriculum after she's had Saxon since kindergarten. Suggestions?
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
3,312 Posts
You might consider this: Mathematical Reasoning (by Critical Thinking Co.)

I'm not familiar with that particular level, but I've worked with the 4th and 5th grade levels. It's a little more 'fun' than Saxon, in that they tend to make little games out of the worksheets, such as using crossword (crossnumber?) puzzles and drills where each answer represent a letter and the student uses those letters to find the hidden answer to a riddle. It's a spiral approach like Saxon, although less obviously so. You can also read the reviews on Amazon - they helped me.

I've had the same problem as you with Saxon, and yet find I keep going back to it... :dunno: It's boring, but it's a good program, but it's boring, but it's a good program, but it's boring...
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Lol, that's what my brain is thinking too!! I think overall it's a great program but sheesh! Can't they put just a little color on the pages? Some pictures SOMETHING??? grr..
 

·
There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.
Joined
·
8,927 Posts
Not sure what your thoughts are on computer software but there are a lot of cool math based programs that look like games but are educational. These can help make math more fun and supplement the boring stuff. ;)

Number Munchers is one I remember as is Alge-Blasters.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
3,312 Posts
FWIW, I've learned to be cautious when it comes to the computer programs for math. It all depends on the kid and on the program, of course. But with my son I found that he had learned to guess rather than to do actual computational work.

Like I said, it depends on the child (mine hates math) and on the program, and also on your particular goals, but I just thought I'd throw that out there as a cautionary tale. :)
 

·
Member
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
Whatever you use, try to be positive about math with your child. The typical teacher in the public schools starts the year with "you're going to have to work hard" or "there is going to be a lot of homework" and turns off the kids day 1. Start with "math is beautiful" or "you can solve a lot of interesting problems with math" and you'll get a very different result.

BTW: math is beautiful, but the beauty is between your ears, not in the colors in a workbook.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I try to incorporate what we've learned in the book to real life. Like we will go to the grocery store and add and subtract prices or whatever. But generally the day to day is just boring for me let alone an 8 year old. I found that it's becoming as much of a drag for me to teach Saxon as it is for her to learn it. I try to make it "beautiful" but I secretly hate math myself and I suppose she picks up on that.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
Well, I try to incorporate what we've learned in the book to real life. Like we will go to the grocery store and add and subtract prices or whatever. But generally the day to day is just boring for me let alone an 8 year old. I found that it's becoming as much of a drag for me to teach Saxon as it is for her to learn it. I try to make it "beautiful" but I secretly hate math myself and I suppose she picks up on that.
You are right that she will pick up on your attitude and it isn't the attitude you want if you want her to learn. Get a tutor or whatever you need to teach her that math is indeed beautiful. There is no more pure beauty than mathematics. It is entirely conceptual. The beauty is dependent on being able to appreciate it. It is extremely hard for a child to learn something with a negative attitude. A lot of the problem with the schools is that the teachers convey a poor attitude and the kids never get past it. Unless you can do better, or get someone who can do better, why home school?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I started my youngest daughter out on Saxon in first grade. She ended up hating math and cried! We took a break for a year then went to Math-u-see. Wow! What a change! I even learned things from the way it was presented! My two eldest daughters are also using it for their kids. Even my son-in-law used the advanced curriculum as a refresher before college calculus! Lol! It is super easy to understand and fun! Remember, each child learns differently so you want to find the best curriculum that works for them. They used to have some samples to try online. Check it out for your child's sake.


Sent from my iPhone using Survival Forum
 

·
Member
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You are right that she will pick up on your attitude and it isn't the attitude you want if you want her to learn. Get a tutor or whatever you need to teach her that math is indeed beautiful. There is no more pure beauty than mathematics. It is entirely conceptual. The beauty is dependent on being able to appreciate it. It is extremely hard for a child to learn something with a negative attitude. A lot of the problem with the schools is that the teachers convey a poor attitude and the kids never get past it. Unless you can do better, or get someone who can do better, why home school?
There aren't a whole lot of tutors around here and I'm not wealthy enough to drive her 70 miles to a big city and pay some company like Sylvan Learning center $1200 a month in the hopes that somebody there can show her that math is beautiful. Sorry if that offends you in any way, but it's not realistic for us. She's not struggling in math at all. In fact she's doing very well. It's simply a matter of our curriculum being boring. That's why I was asking the question in the first place. Because I WANT to make math more fun and interesting for her.
As for why I homeschool in the first place, I am doing it because of exactly what you mentioned above. My daughter was struggling in reading. Was put into the reading recovery program at school and made little, if any progress. I received an e-mail from the teacher saying she had told our daughter that "her parents were very disappointed in her". I pulled her out of the program the very next day. I have spent almost an entire year trying to undo the mental damage that her teachers did while she was struggling to read. She is reading fine now, by the way. Each child learns differently and at a different pace. Some children need more time and attention on one subject or another and that is what is so beautiful about homeschool. You have the ability to take as much time on something as they need to master it before you move on. I hold this to be true for reading as well as math. Public school teachers don't have the time to do that, nor do some care about doing it.
I have also been helping my 6th grade son with his math. He has a brand new teacher, fresh out of college who is big on teaching "personal responsibility". So when my son was putting his math homework in the wrong 'in-box' for the entire first semester, she threw it away and gave him a 0% on each and every one of them. No reminders, no comments. Just a 0%. This, then translated into failing test grades because he didn't have his homework to study with. How beautiful do you think he thinks math is? Can he understand the concepts? Sure can, because I've been teaching them to him here at home every night after school. Which is better? Leave it to the "professionals" or take change of it myself, own up to the responsibility I have as a parent to teach my children, and do it myself? I believe the latter.
 

·
There is a place in Hell for me...the THRONE.
Joined
·
8,927 Posts
Sylvan and Kumon both offer learning aids that you don't have to got to their centers to get. My dad has a few of the reading packages for his adult tutoring he does and I have some of the lower math ones for Roo. I took a look at them and they offer flash cards, games and workbooks. I got mine for $8 each at Costco.

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odk...&_nkw=sylvan+learning+math&_sacat=0&_from=R40

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odk...arning+math&_nkw=kumon+learning+math&_sacat=0



There aren't a whole lot of tutors around here and I'm not wealthy enough to drive her 70 miles to a big city and pay some company like Sylvan Learning center $1200 a month in the hopes that somebody there can show her that math is beautiful. Sorry if that offends you in any way, but it's not realistic for us. She's not struggling in math at all. In fact she's doing very well. It's simply a matter of our curriculum being boring. That's why I was asking the question in the first place. Because I WANT to make math more fun and interesting for her.
As for why I homeschool in the first place, I am doing it because of exactly what you mentioned above. My daughter was struggling in reading. Was put into the reading recovery program at school and made little, if any progress. I received an e-mail from the teacher saying she had told our daughter that "her parents were very disappointed in her". I pulled her out of the program the very next day. I have spent almost an entire year trying to undo the mental damage that her teachers did while she was struggling to read. She is reading fine now, by the way. Each child learns differently and at a different pace. Some children need more time and attention on one subject or another and that is what is so beautiful about homeschool. You have the ability to take as much time on something as they need to master it before you move on. I hold this to be true for reading as well as math. Public school teachers don't have the time to do that, nor do some care about doing it.
I have also been helping my 6th grade son with his math. He has a brand new teacher, fresh out of college who is big on teaching "personal responsibility". So when my son was putting his math homework in the wrong 'in-box' for the entire first semester, she threw it away and gave him a 0% on each and every one of them. No reminders, no comments. Just a 0%. This, then translated into failing test grades because he didn't have his homework to study with. How beautiful do you think he thinks math is? Can he understand the concepts? Sure can, because I've been teaching them to him here at home every night after school. Which is better? Leave it to the "professionals" or take change of it myself, own up to the responsibility I have as a parent to teach my children, and do it myself? I believe the latter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,575 Posts
When it comes to learning programs, boring is good. It's better for them to learn with as little entertainment involved as possible. Learning can be hard work. When I was a kid we just toughed it out. That lack of entertainment was a good thing for us. Kids of all ages these days are addicted to entertainment if have a smartphone or a tablet. It makes it harder for the young to function in the real world when work is so boring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I know this is an older thread, but my older daughter loved Teaching Textbooks. It's a computer based program and is totally awesome for kids that need a little help with math. My younger daughter, who is a workbook kid, loves Christian Light Education (CLE) math.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top