Canned Food With The Highest Calories ??

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by neil-v1, Aug 29, 2010.

  1. neil-v1

    neil-v1 Old Member

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    I started prepping after the first time I visited this site. I think this site is a very, very valuable tool for every person to use........Anyway, I am kinda kickin myself in the bum now for buying so many cans of vegetables when I could have been investing that money (as far as canned goods go) in things like corned beef hash or roast beef hash, beef stew, chili, etc. etc. Things that have a high caloric content and can really keep your butt ALIVE. I put most of my prep money in dry goods now (and of course ammo) and have done well I think. I just keep kicking myself for not knowing more so I could have spent the money more wisely. I guess I am just posting this for any new folk's here so they can learn from it. I am sure I will be very happy to have my vegies when the time comes, but I am glad I know more now so that I won't starve to death eating a majority of them.

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone has any other ideas as far as high calorie count canned goods, etc that people should look at in the early stages to add to any rice / grain stocks? I hope this post does not sound stupid? I just would much prefer to have 300 cans of beef stew in the pantry over 300 cans of green beens, etc. Hope this makes sense.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2010
  2. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    It's not too late to keep buying canned goods, and you can start getting the higher calorie things now. Sounds like you've done fine so far. Great start, great job.

    The highest calorie canned foods will be those with some fats/oils in them. Meats are a good one, as is meat stew, meat ravioli, etc. Chili with meat. Tuna in oil. Canned ham, canned chicken, etc. Check olives, they might be higher in calories too.

    The very highest in a can is Sweetened condensed milk. There's more than 1,300 calories in a can. Awfully sweet stuff, but tons of energy in that can!

    You can make a quick rice pudding by adding the stuff to cooked rice. Add a little vanilla and/or cinnamon, too, if you have it.

    Speaking of which, spices are something I have to keep reminding myself to stock up on...
     

  3. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    i would think cans of chicken breast would be a healthier product to stock than canned hash, in a survival situation, a person should always eat the best foods they can to stay in the best health.Chicken breast aren't to bad if doctored up with some mustard or warmed on a grill with bar be Q sauce. hash is 270 fat cal and 35% cholest,33% sodium.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2010
  4. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Peanut butter is an item that will give you a lot of bang (calories) for the buck. 190 calories in 2 tablespoons with 130 of those calories coming from fat. Yeah, I just went out and looked at the jar. :rolleyes: We keep a lot of PB on hand.
     
  5. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I love my PB-honey-n-Cheeze sandwiches - lots of energy packed into a simple sandwich. Add in a couple of cross-country-cookies and you have energy for a day! (You can see my recipe for cross-country-cookies here in the recipe section).
     
  6. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    *slaps forehead* Why didn't I think of peanut butter!!!

    If you can find it in glass jars and keep it in a dark place, it'll keep from getting rancid as quickly as plastic jars. Even so, I think it takes a year or two for it to go rancid in plastic jars. Harder to find in glass, but it's out there.
     
  7. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    I've read several accounts of Alaskan trappers and hunters who carry a jar of peanut butter as survival food when they're out in the woods.
    Even if you're good at "living off the land" the fat content of wild food (including game animals) is very low. You need the fat to keep warm in cold climates and PB is a concentrated dose of both calories and fat.
     
  8. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    in my personal experience, the foil-lined bulk cans of generic peanut butter keep for 10 years (tasted fine)

    quality over calorie is a debate I've seen in this thread & elsewhere and my personal opinion is that if you have the money/space get the healthiest food you can... but sometimes there is something to be said for all those extra fat calories (especially in the winter)

    my only other advice at the moment is to try to store as close to a diet of stuff that you already are eating, that way you know you won't be miserable on 'survival food'
     
  9. GroovyMike

    GroovyMike Well-Known Member

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    great advice above. they already said everything I was going to type.
     
  10. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    I love peanut butter but don't eat it anymore, but young people(GKs) may be coming to stay here if things get real tough so we store a few jars for them
    [​IMG]
     
  11. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    That looks like my stash of PB but I noticed you don't have near enough jars of real PB, y'know, the ones with the red lid. :D
     
  12. drhwest

    drhwest Junior Member

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    I think canned salmon would be good. Which leads to another question...

    Why does canned salmon have such a long shelf life? I've looked at several brands and they all have at least a 4 year shelf life. I even found one that had a summer expiration date for 2016. The only thing that I have noticed is that salmon has an oddly shaped can. It is somewhat conical, having a larger base and a tappered top.
     
  13. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    datrex & mainstay both make a pretty small (& tasty) 3600 (total) (k)calorie energy bar

    kind of expensive, but good for short-term BOBs
     
  14. goose

    goose Active Member

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    I think this is one of the less well-understood elements of survival prep--that you need fat in your diet.

    It's fine to stock rice, beans, wheat, stuff like that which has an extremely long shelf-life. Problem is, almost no fat. And we need fat in our diet.

    According to the McKinley Health Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign:

    WHY DO WE NEED FAT TO SURVIVE?
    Although fats have received a bad reputation for causing weight gain, some fat is essential for survival. According to the Dietary Reference Intakes published by the USDA 20% - 35% of calories should come from fat. We need this amount of fat for:

    Normal growth and development
    Energy (fat is the most concentrated source of energy)
    Absorbing certain vitamins ( like vitamins A, D, E, K, and carotenoids)
    Providing cushioning for the organs
    Maintaining cell membranes
    Providing taste, consistency, and stability to foods


    (McKinley Health Center - Macronutrients: the Importance of Carbohydrate, Protein, and Fat - University of Illinois



    Storing fats long-term is problematic, to say the least.

    One reason I stock spam--yes, spam--is due to fat content.

    I recently bought one of the processed tinned hams Aldi sells ($2.69); fat content is 60 percent! It's reasonably palatable, but the real gem is that it lasts years and has that high fat content. So I think I'll be laying in a number of those as well. I can see using it in a rice and bean dish.


    I'd love to stock Peanut Butter for all the obvious reasons--it really is a lovely food--but we don't eat a lot of it and I'm afraid it would go to waste as the PB went rancid.

    I'd love to know other long-term-storage sources of fats and oils.
     
  15. goose

    goose Active Member

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    I decided to check on this, and simply googled "why does canned salmon have such a long shelf life?"

    Here's what I found as a link:

    Gold Seal - FAQ

    It doesn't say why (though the claim is 10 years, same for canned tuna), but what it does say, among other things, is that they use tapered cans because when empty, they nest, saving space.
     
  16. lotsoflead

    lotsoflead Well-Known Member

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    we buy a couple gal of the olive oil everytime it's on sale like half price and just leave it in the cans where it's cool and dry. we vacuum pack other oils in mason jars and store it in the same place. I think we're going to pick up 15-20 cans of the solid veg shortening and melt it just enough to get it out of the cans, then pour it in plastic pails lined with mylar bags, I think having about 15 gallons of that stuff may last longer than anything. We keep about 80 pounds of butter in one of the freezers most of the time, but if we lost power for a long time butter will spoil.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  17. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    this part of the thread just reminded me of something...

    has anyone tried pressing their own vegetable oil? to me, it's one of those things I would rather stock up on than produce, but eventually it's a skill/necessity I might just have to do
     
  18. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    lotsoflead, butter can also be canned. If you lost power long-term and you have the canner and jars, can at least some of it. There are directions on another thread here, but basically you cube it into sterilized (boiled) jars, let it melt until the jar is filled (I set it in shallow water in a pan on the stove on low heat), put lids on, and water-bath it for 30 mins. to 1 hour (depends on which internet directions you read!)

    I've bought cheap shortening and cooking oil and repacked them into glass jars, vacuum sealed them, and put them in our root cellar to lengthen their shelf-life.
     
  19. sailaway

    sailaway Well-Known Member

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    Seems like we all like PB, I have alot of that. I also have alot of those small cans of Vienna Snausages, yum yum!:D
     
  20. Clarice

    Clarice Well-Known Member

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    As for peanut butter we eat it everyday, in some form or another. If I know I need extra energy in the mornings, I'll have a PBJ sandwich for breakfast. We both like PB and crackers. I make PB cookies with the crunchy.
    On another note, I have stocked my pantry with several "cans" of shortening. I do not like the cardboard cans, is there a way to repack in glass jars and reseal?