Calorie book and a balance scale

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by SurviveNthrive, Nov 12, 2010.

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  1. SurviveNthrive

    SurviveNthrive a dude

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    I just added a few things to my need to get list.

    I've come to use the Internet for many things which is good now, but I don't have a book with calorie counts for many items. I also have battery dependent scales for lighter items in redundancy, but what about when there's no more batteries?

    For food bartering, portion control, and other essential post SHTF situations, food is going to be critical and these two items, easy to get now, might be worth having for then.
     
  2. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    The scales? ... maybe. Of course how are you going to persuade anyone the scales are accurate?

    Counting calories? ... Don't think so. Between military chow halls and camp cooks I don't know of anyone who uses calories to determine portion sizes.
     

  3. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    SurviveNthrive - you and I are very different preppers. :D (Which is not a bad thing) ... we just look at things with different eyes. (For each their own. )

    I have more than a few older cookbooks that have calorie counts but I do not see myself putting them to use.

    A battery dependent scales - Yes, I have one along with a 'balance scale" I use them for canning an my herbs and such...but I do not see them for food bartering or portion control ...

    but that is just me. :D
     
  4. SurviveNthrive

    SurviveNthrive a dude

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    In very lean times, counting calories is precisely what the sharper individuals will do, almost at a religious level.

    Now take a second to reconsider things, in a historic and pragmatic matter. This is where comprehensively thinking things through matters in preparedness. I'm writing to those who are doing preparedness in depth and wish to preserve options by having assets, not only in long term storage food items but also in means of measuring their value.

    The scales.

    The scales? ... maybe. Of course how are you going to persuade anyone the scales are accurate?

    How can a balance scale be inaccurate? It either balances or it does not, that's why they're used and trusted world wide. The weighs might be potentially off, but the scale is based on balance. There are known weight items such as coins which can be used to gauge the weights so that's not a problem.


    Counting calories? ... Don't think so. Between military chow halls and camp cooks I don't know of anyone who uses calories to determine portion sizes.

    That's because you're dealing with spoons at too low a level. There's a difference between some private or specialist spooning out portions, the Sergeant supervising them and the Senior NCO who is a trained nutritionist. I'm sure that the senior Noncoms and the OIC are very aware of portion control and calorie counts. Having periodically served, in an additional duty capacity, as an OIC for a large mess hall, the senior NCO's I dealt with understood portion control and calories.

    Post SHTF we aren't likely to have an abundance of food where it doesn't matter, we can get enough of what we need amid the excess. We'll have to be our own nutritionists making decisions on what is worth pursuing and not worth working toward and that takes knowledge.

    Effective portion control is critical to rationing. Determining how large a portion of dry cereal, salt, TVP and other items should be is important.

    I have more than a few older cookbooks that have calorie counts but I do not see myself putting them to use.

    A battery dependent scales - Yes, I have one along with a 'balance scale" I use them for canning an my herbs and such...but I do not see them for food bartering or portion control ...

    but that is just me.


    Food value includes different aspects, including beyond taste and variety, calories, nutrition and lipids.

    Now suppose you have someone wishing to trade a food item for another food item that you have in quantity. I want to make an informed decision before I do so.


    A fundamental of 'trade' is understanding the value of what you're willing to part with and the value of what you're seeking.

    Preparedness is about preserving options.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2010
  5. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    But you see ... that is where we are very different ... I don't have anything to trade ... (like I said ... I see things with different eyes)

    And to be honest ... anyone that makes it to my house 'to trade' ... well ... something is just not right. ;)
     
  6. jnrdesertrats

    jnrdesertrats Noob

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    All us paper currency weighs exactly 1 gram, assuming it is not wet or damp.

    In my youth I used this method to verify the accuracy of a persons scales.

    My understanding is that the method of weighing money was used by organized crime before counting machines as well. Of course I have not tried it with the new funny money. Even if money has no value it will still be useful as a calibration tool. Try it...
     
  7. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Scales and calorie counts after TSHTF? I don't think so, not here anyway! That's thinking too hard, and we'll have much more to do and think about than that. In this area here, people would thknk we were snobs or crooks if we were that "precise"!

    I don't even worrry about things like calorie counts. We produce nearly all our own food, so I'm pretty confident in the healthfulness of it, and portion size is mostly what we pay attention to. That's primarily to use our resources wisely.

    I suspect out in this woods, barter would consist of a handful or two of this for a handful or two of that.

    However, I do respect that in other locales, people might wish to be more..."civilized" or exact.
     
  8. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Got news for you ... if you have lots of extra food stored and don't have to grow your own and if you have a large group maybe you'll spend lots of time precisely counting calories and measuring things out but if you have to grow your own you aren't going to have time or energy for such foolishness.

    Regarding scales? Not all non-electric scales are balance scales. Lots of supermarkets have spring loaded scales in the produce departmets. Many old time grocery stores had spring loaded scales on their counters. Some old scales were balance beam scales. Occasionally you'd even see balance scales with the weight on one side and the merchandise on the other. The point being that there are lots of different types of non-elelctric scales.

    Just a question here ... do you actually do anything survival related or are you just one of those who "thinks" about it?
     
  9. SurviveNthrive

    SurviveNthrive a dude

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    Got news for you ... if you have lots of extra food stored and don't have to grow your own and if you have a large group maybe you'll spend lots of time precisely counting calories and measuring things out but if you have to grow your own you aren't going to have time or energy for such foolishness.

    There are some people with the capability of discussion.
    Some issues aren't worth discussing with some people.
    It's silly to waste anything arguing with someone who can't grasp somethings as simple like the value of measurement, portion control and trade.


    Regarding scales? Not all non-electric scales are balance scales. Lots of supermarkets have spring loaded scales in the produce departmets. Many old time grocery stores had spring loaded scales on their counters. Some old scales were balance beam scales. Occasionally you'd even see balance scales with the weight on one side and the merchandise on the other. The point being that there are lots of different types of non-elelctric scales.

    Reading comprehension.

    I mentioned specifically balance scales. In normal reading, that excludes a need to bring in problems with other non-electric scales.

    But I've already excluded you as being worthy of bringing up discussion.

    Just a question here ... do you actually do anything survival related or are you just one of those who "thinks" about it?

    If you disagree, why do you bother answering my posts? I certainly would prefer to believe that you continue on your way, with your views.

    Is to 'think' a bad thing to you?

    I think it's hilarious that someone who is 'off the grid' is on the Internet.:nuts:


    Since you don't like my posts and don't agree with them, then LOGICALLY, this is the last time I'll see your response to one of them. Bye!:wave:
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  10. SurviveNthrive

    SurviveNthrive a dude

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    To me preparedness is about preserving options. A balance scale is a wonderful thing to have for many areas of preparedness, including chemistry and the mentioned barter and portion control. Right now I've some nice digital scales, but I'm seriously considering buying a precision balance scale.

    One more issue supporting addding a scale to preps:

    In many survival situations, one of the sources of dispute is fair food distribution. A scale is useful in eliminating that potential source of strife.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  11. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    I bought 2 spring loaded scales at auction this past summer. They were cheap and I've considered the possiblity that weighing things like sugar and salt, or smaller portions of grian, may be beneficial.
    It says right on the face of the scale; not legal for trade. I wouldn't trust them to be very accurate under 8oz. However, I've tested them and if they are inaccurate, it's to the same degree. If I would ever want to trade with someone based on the weight of a product, I would accept what the scale said since it would be the same inaccuracy for both parties.

    Counting calories? Never gonna happen.
     
  12. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    Thanks for all the extra info ... :D

    but once again ... we agree to disagree ... :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  13. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    For me, there is only one way that I will be "counting" calories, that is with a teaspoon or a tablespoon or a measuring cup. When mixing ingredients together to make a meal, I will either use the "looks-good-enough" method or the "precise-measurement" method. I know that when I have a pound-of-ground-meat (deer, beef, pork, chicken, etc) I can mix that up with bread-crumbs, an egg and some of my favorite spices to make burgers on the BBQ. I know that pound of meat when combined with a bun, some fresh veggies (lettuce, tomato) and maybe some condiments will leave several people full by the time they finish the simple meal.

    To me, that is the only way that the calories will count. Simply, will the person be able to eat the meal set before them and will they be able to work for 4hrs easily from the energy provided by that meal. If the answer is "YES" to both, then it means that the calories counted
     
  14. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Sorry bud. I thought this was an open forum for discussion of ideas. I was under the impression that discussion was a good thing. It might even shed some light on ideas a person has that aren't as good as they originally thought ... that is if they're teachable.

    Now, being an open forum with people reading it who may be misled by bad advice wouldn't it seem logical that discussion (especially divergent views of the OP position) could possibly give them more options to pursue or a better way to evaluate opposite views?

    If your posts are not open to discussion you should state it up front. If you are so superior perhaps we ignorant peons should just recognize that and bow to your greater knowledge.

    Regarding being off-grid and on the internet? What's the problem there?

    And again, in my experience (which could be wrong!) people who think too hard often don't acomplish a lot. Are you actually preparing or just thinking about it? There are people on this forum who live what they post. Because of my background I've always been more impressed by people who "do" than those who just have a bunch of ideas for other people to do.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  15. SurviveNthrive

    SurviveNthrive a dude

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    Dang, ya came back!

    And again, in my experience (which could be wrong!) people who think too hard often don't acomplish a lot

    How does one 'think too hard'? Does that hurt?:D

    I had to play with that one as the concept is amusing.

    Are you actually preparing or just thinking about it? There are people on this forum who live what they post

    Why in Heavens name are you living like the collapse has already happen or we've experienced a natural disaster??? :eek:

    That's a MAJOR FAIL in life... who wants to be without electricity and plumbing, living on long-term storage foods, fearing security concerns, and wondering if their source of drinking water is assured and safe???

    I shower daily, eat salads and fresh fruit daily. I keep warm or cool in a solid dwelling. Preparedness is about preserving some quality of life. Survivalism is a practice. I don't want to live like TSHTF.

    Why in the world would anyone 'live what they post' when discussing post SHTF situations. That's horrific.

    I don't believe you really understand PREPAREDNESS. It's call PREPARED Society, not living a truly miserable existence.

    Because of my background I've always been more impressed by people who "do" than those who just have a bunch of ideas for other people to do.

    I've no doubt. That's why you can be 'off the grid' and on the Internet.


    But please, you posted you disagree but keep coming back. Some other people might be able to understand preparedness beyond what you think it to be.

    Being able to understand food values, nutrition, and calories, and having a scale to measure portions are pretty important things when one is dealing with more than one or two people.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  16. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    Now, this is all just my opinion so please dn't get your drawers in a knot over it!
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  17. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Interestingly enough, there are quite a few people on this forum who are 'off the grid' and have internet. In our case, 'off the grid' is solar and wind power, which is progressive, not primitive. Going 'off grid' doesn't mean we turned out back on civilization! Now who's being hilarious! :rolleyes:

    I also still think there are large rural areas, with which you are assumably not familiar with, that won't function on a level that will require scales and exact measures. Life in rural areas flows to a different current. Not better, not less than urban life.

    I'm sure there are people of all different opinions on the need for such things as scales and calorie counteres. I merely wanted to express what I see happening in NW Montana, our home. If you only wanted replies on your posts that agree with you, this wouldn't be a very interesting forum.

    :)
     
  18. efbjr

    efbjr Well-Known Member

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    Google: "The Complete Book of Food Counts" by Corrine Netzer.

    Available in various editions and prices on Amazon, etc. I got my copy for 25 cents at a library book sale (in new condition). Awesome book! :D
     
  19. SurviveNthrive

    SurviveNthrive a dude

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    efbjr, good book...thank you, the sort of info I'm looking for.



    Mosquito, how about this tact, accepting the fact that you've got the ultimate and enviable survivalist retreat and you're already living the mad max existence where you claim you're writing wolf tickets to the bad guys and they're scared, maybe, just maybe others aren't at the same level as you and they can benefit about thinking about things and like the rest of the ancient, contemporary and future world, they can use a scale at times because they don't have calibrated hands and like most of humanity, they might not possess an innate understanding of nutrition.

    I especially liked the critical VCR survivailst tool issue being covered.:D

    One serious prep security issue...if you're living in an area where you personally know the bad guys well enough to personally threaten them and they're not being locked up, maybe, just maybe that's an indicator that there might be more problems once things actually go bad.

    One serious prep logistic issue...you say you're already living the life. Are you drilling your own crude oil and refining your own gasoline in your personal distillery? I'm taking you at your word that you're living a post SHTF life, so you're a very unique individual. I don't think Ted Turner has that!

    If you're buying any gas, then you know and I know that erodes your credibility because you're living the post SHTF life and gasoline is one of the first things to go.

    [I like a good scrap now and then, I hope you feel the same.]
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  20. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe Well-Known Member

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    Everyone has there own way of prepping. Different ideas are always worth hearing until they turn into personal attacks. This thread is turning into a shouting match and nothing good can come from that. Let's put the head butting to rest, act like reasonable adults and agree to disagree if that's what it takes to keep the board civil.
     
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