Butter/Cheese & Botulisum?

Discussion in 'General Food and Foraging Discussion' started by OldCootHillbilly, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. OldCootHillbilly

    OldCootHillbilly Reverend Coot

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    I got a feller herrasin me about water bath cannin butter an cheese. Said it's not safe that you will get botulisum. I think he be blowin smoke myself, but what yall think? If it was meat er somthin like that, yeah, yer gonna pressure can it, but I don't think so on dairy?
     
  2. OldCootHillbilly

    OldCootHillbilly Reverend Coot

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    Everthing I keep readin on this subject says ta water bath can. I see no reason it needs ta be pressure canned.

    I guess some people just need something ta grump about.
     

  3. PamsPride

    PamsPride edirPsmaP

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    Tell him he has nothing to worry about because you did not plan on giving him any anyways! :D
     
  4. JayJay

    JayJay Well-Known Member

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    I boiled mine, following directions from another site...one lady said she opened a can 4 yrs. canned, and it was great--that sold me.
     
  5. iouJC

    iouJC MAGIC Bullet

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    The problem with water bath canning butter s it is not "recommended" due to the fact that it contains fat which is not neccessarily rendered safe according to govenment standards for food preservation. The choice is yours to make....do you want to be absolutely safe or do you want to enjoy the flavor and joy of real butter on your food?
    I have not yet made up my mind....thus I have not yet canned any butter.
     
  6. OldCootHillbilly

    OldCootHillbilly Reverend Coot

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    Well, guess life is full a choices. I ain't sure all the food we buy necessarily be safe, so, If I can keep things clean, store it properly I feel the risk would be minimal.

    They sell canned butter, so it must not be immposible, maybe the only difference being pressure can it rather then water bath. Everbody I've seen that cans it though does so with a water bath canner. Guess we'll keep an eye on the experiment.
     
  7. catsraven

    catsraven Meoww

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    Why would you can cheese? Cheese will keep for long time if properly stored. Around 5 years.
     
  8. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    I can cheese because it doesn't get mold on it that I have to cut off. It's an easier way for me to properly store cheese! My parents used to dip their cheese in wax and wrap it in cloth and it in a cool place. Every so often we'd cut off the mold and slice off what we needed.

    I think part of the problem some people might worry about is the density, and does enough heat get to the middle to kill anything "bad". That wouldn't be a problem with butter, but cheese is pretty dense.

    Neither butter or cheese are foods that are associated with botulism and the environment needed for it to grow. I feel safe with my home-canned butter and cheeses.

    I just did a google search on it, and it appears that while cheese SAUCES can get botulism, because of other ingredients added, cheese itself cannot support the growth of botulism, since botulism is anaerobic.

    But certainly, if you have any doubts, don't can it or eat anyone else's canned butter or cheese. There are exellent freeze-dried cheeses and butters out there, as well as commercially canned products.
     
  9. catsraven

    catsraven Meoww

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    I dont see how it would be easier but to each his or her own :)
     
  10. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    :melikey:

    I will have to remember that! lol
     
  11. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    Just a question ... is this butter/cheese that you have made or do you buy it and then can it.

    And to your question about botulisum ... I have no clue. (sorry) I do not can either.

    but like catsraven said ... to each his or her own. :)
     
  12. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    What could be hard about canning cheese? You just shove it in jars, put the lid and ring on it, and set it in a kettle, cover the jar with water and let it boil an hour. Done.

    I have a 5-gallon kettle of water boiling on the woodstove about 8 months of the year here in NW Montana. I just drop a canner rack in it and drop the jars onto it, and ignore the whole mess for at least an hour. Ues the jar lifter to fish them out and set them on a towel.

    Yup. To each his or her own! :D
     
  13. catsraven

    catsraven Meoww

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    You dont live in a house like mine ;). You have to get kitchen time or every one will get in your way :eek:. I have to fined a time when every one is gone or stay up late to do anything in the kitchen. Someone is always wanting to use the stove for something. It gets very aggravating. That is why it is easier to use wax in my house. Melt it (it only uses one small pan) and paint it on.
     
  14. JayJay

    JayJay Well-Known Member

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    I didn't can butter for a cost benefit--I canned it because when electricity is no longer available---I can have pancake, syrup I canned, with butter I canned.

    I know I can buy syrup at Save-a-Lot for $1---but it won't last like my canned syrup.


    I hope!!:2thumb:
     
  15. OldCootHillbilly

    OldCootHillbilly Reverend Coot

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    The stuff I canned was commercially produced.

    I still don't find anything what says it will support botulisum. If this was a meat product would be a no brainer, inta the pressure canner it would go.

    You can buy canned cheese an butter, I hate ta pay somebody else to do what I can at home plus the shippin. That be money that can add ta supplies. Also, ya never know where er what be in that product. At least here I have a better idear a what wen't inta the jar.
     
  16. gypsysue

    gypsysue The wanderer

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    Well, we live off-grid, so we're doing the have-it-because-there's-no-electricity thing now, by cannnig butter (and cheese).

    The only cost benefit I have is that I bought a lot of butter on a good sale ($1.50/lb.) and canned it at a cost of about 10 cents a lid. The canning process was free because I water-bathed it on the woodstove, which already had a fire in it to heat the house!

    In the long range I still saved at least .90/lb. at off-sale prices of $2.50/lb and up. That's what I do with cheese, too. I wait until the 2-lb. blocks go on sale for $4 and buy half a dozen of them, and can them.

    I have to admit, that paint-it-with-wax method sounds pretty tempting to try. I didn't remember how my Mom did that waaaaaaayyyyy back when I was a kid! :D
     
  17. Tirediron

    Tirediron RockyMountainCanadian

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    I thought that pressure canning / canners was to make up for the lower boiling point of water at higher altitudes.
     
  18. OldCootHillbilly

    OldCootHillbilly Reverend Coot

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    A pressure canner raises the temperature a what water boils at allowin a higher cannin temp then ya can get with a water bath canner.

    That be why it is used on low acid foods ta kill off the nasteys what will survive a water bath canner.
     
  19. lhalfcent

    lhalfcent Supporting Member

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    before you can butter you melt it and skim the fat off so you basically have clarified butter or ghee.
    so you don't have the issue with botulism etc.
    it does work and tastes fine. :):2thumb:
     
  20. rhrobert

    rhrobert Happy in the hills

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    You skim off all the goodness??? I can butter, I don't can ghee. My parents, and grandparents canned butter, water bath style, and ain't a one of us ever got sick.

    OldCoot, just don't share it with them that don't think it's safe...to each their own.