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Is putting up burglar bars tacky these days in nice residential areas? What if you wanted to protect your windows from intruder access in a less tacky way but from the inside? Does anyone know some solutions for this (remember, security alarms don't literally stop people from entering, they merely make noise)
 

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Tempered glass storm windows may be an alternative. Windows are generally used as an access point, by less experienced BG's, because regular glass is easy to break. Burgular bars simply let everyone know that you have something worth taking.

Your door is really the easiest entrance point since it is only secured at the hinges and the lock.

It really depends on what you are trying to prevent. Are you concerned about daytime burgularies, when your home is empty, or are you more concerned about a night time home invasion situation?
 

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For basement windows, glass block is hard to beat. For regular windows...good question. :confused:

(Suggestion: for valuables that can be locked up, get a safe or safes, bolt them to the inside of closet floors, and keep your stuff in them. If you're worried about home intrusion, get a Remington 870.)
 

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You first need to make sure these will stay affixed to the walls well but you could put them on the inside of the house and have a hinged lockable window gate in case you need to get out through it.
 

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First and foremost are the two things that are true.

1. A burglar WILL get into your home.
2. A burglar NEEDS A REASON to get into your home.

Since you can't stop a burglar stone dead, you have to minimize the time they will spend in your home - and that means an audible burglar alarm. No burglar, amateur or professional will spend much or any time in a home with a wailing alarm. There are two schools of thought on posting the "home protected by burglar alarm system." One says it scares the bad guys away, and another says it attracts them because you must have something to protect. Police departments ROUTINELY place any burglar alarm at the lowest priority for a response. In my city, for instance, they have published a policy that states that unverified burglar alarms (alarms without someone verifying that it's actually a good alarm, like a neighbor SEEING the bad guy) will be placed at the bottom of the list. And with calls typically stacking up all day long, it literally means they wont show up at all. Burglars KNOW THIS, and calculate their "stay time" accordingly.

The second truism can be addressed simply by NOT visibly having anything worth stealing. You should never dispose of expensive electronics shipping cartons with your normal trash. You should never be seen lugging guns in and out of your home. You should let your neighbors believe that you give all your money to your church, because the odds are that you will be burglarized by one of their teenagers. If you HAVE children, you need to carefully vet their friends - the more friends they have that come over and SEE what you have to steal, the bigger the chance that it will happen. Frankly, I leave my back door open, the burglar would already be over/through the fence - and I don't want to have pay for a repair to my door too. Once in, I have a silent alarm and a local 24 hour security company that responds to it. For invasion protection I use a 2x4 across the bottom of my front door. It fits snugly into the jamb and absolutely protects against kicking the door, you can eventually smash your way in through the door - but even if you kick out the deadbolt, the door will not move. I do not believe in a lightweight front door either - no hollow cores.

Bars advertise that you've something worth stealing, or that you are afraid of something. Neither is something I wish to be thought of me.
 

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What about tape that you could cover the windows with that makes it shatter proof and then bolt it onto the outer frame somehow... then use the two by four method with the doors?
 

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In almost all of the South Florida metro areas, the homes have burglar bars. I've always thought I'd like to have them. Check out the local library, on what types, & how they are constructed. Be sure they have a means of opening from the inside in case of fire. Most are hinged, with a foot treadle lock that is only accessible from the inside.
 

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Isn't south florida also the home of the new-improved method of burglarizing a house? Since everybody has bars, the bad guys wait until you're just about to get into your car - then essentially kidnap you at gunpoint to have you disable the alarm, etc...

I'd much rather NOT be there!
 

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Being an African, we have burglar bars on anything that opens....tacky?? You are considered "mad" if you don't have them. They have become pretty ornamental in a lot of ways and kinda don't really get seen anymore....it's a way of life
 

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Its possible to make it very difficult for an intruder but one should be ready for that time you are caught off guard. Example would be to have 2 safes in different locations in your home. If you are ever hostage you can give up the one while still saving the other safe. The bait safe does not need to be expensive just make sure its hidden well or the bad guys might not believe you.
 

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A basic jack-all (Hi-lift) is one of the easiest ways to open a door that does not want to open without kicking it in. If you can take apart your walls around the doors, insert 2x4's as braces between all the vertical frame pieces to the 4th or 6th level. You will want to start the 2x4's placed between the dead-bolt and the slam-lock to be most effective. You will also want to do this to your garage. A man-door to a garage is the easiest way into the house (attached).

If you have the ability to change out the wall that your doors are in, use 2x4x.250 HSS steel to create your door frame and weld on tabs that the wood 2x4 braces can join to - and then use regular 2x4 (or 2x6) wood for the rest of the wall.

Change the outter wood panels to 3/4" plywood for the strength and only use long wood screws - no nails. If you are concerned with drive-by-shootings and the like, use multi-pane glass - outter "glass" made out of Percy's High Performance Speedglass and inner glass out of thick panes and use kevlar for insulation.
 

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I am new to this forum and really have gotten a lot out of reading the posts. I was reading this one and just thought I would chime in and give my 2 cents. I work as a professional firefighter and just wanted to remind those people who are considering bulglar bars that not only do they make it more difficult for a intruder to enter, they also slow fiefighters down when they are trying to do a search in your house. While this might be a risk worth taking, just make sure that you get bars that can be opend from the inside allowing you to exit out the window in case of fire or in the event you want to exit out the back window when someone is comming in your front door.
 

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Just wanted to add a few things my self as well.
First thing is if someone wants to get into your home they will , we human can be stubborn that way.
I also agree the window bars are tacky , and a hindrance in an emergency can make it hard to either escape or be rescued if need be.
My friend who is a licensed lock smith has told me of a plastic film like window tint that can be added to windows to make them nearly shatter proof .
I also suggest watching the show It takes a Thief on the discovery network .
It shows a lot of important things about home security.
 

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other options to bars

There is a film that can be applied to windows, kind of like putting tint on a window, but it is almost impervious to breaking. It was advertised in locksmith circles about a year ago. Think it was made by 3M. If anyone is interested, I can probably find a link. Be aware that it was not cheap, and the window frame had to be dismantled to install. If it was just put on the glass, the whole window could be pushed in, but not if the film was installed under the frame. Hope this makes sense.
 

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THINK LIKE A BURGLAR
Professional or amateur burglars will break into your home, if there is an opportunity. Be prepared and fight back.
Getting robbed is an awful feeling and makes you think that you could have done more to prevent it.
By definition, the crime of burglary is a non-confrontational property crime that occurs when we are not at home.
Living in a house takes more places and things to think about when talking security. There are lots of break-in points to consider.
• Use a secondary blocking device on all sliding glass doors
• Keep the latch mechanism in good condition and properly adjusted
• Keep sliding door rollers in good condition and properly adjusted
• Use anti-lift devices such as through-the-door pins or upper track screws
• Use highly visible alarm decals, beware of dog decals or block watch decal
• Secure all accessible windows with secondary blocking devices
• Block accessible windows open no more than 6 inches for ventilation
• Make sure someone cannot reach through an open window and unlock the door
• Make sure someone cannot reach inside the window and remove the blocking device
• Use anti-lift devices to prevent window from being lifted out
• Use crime prevention or alarm decals on ground accessible windows
• Use curtains or blinds over any windows or doors that are easy to see into
• Keep expensive equipment and items away from your windows.
• Install locks or secondary security devices on all accessible windows so they can't be opened far enough for someone to crawl through from the outside.
• Make sure garage lights can be turned on from inside the house so you never have to walk into a dark garage.•
• Use the safe everyday so it becomes routine
• Burglars often target the elderly, so be a friend and keep an eye out for local retirees.
• Fire doors are meant to let a person safely exit a building in case of fire - not to let a burglar safely enter it. Keep your hardware updated and the doors closed.
• When living with multiple people, make sure everyone understands the importance of home security. It only takes one person to leave everyone else vulnerable. But don't rely on others; keep your private possessions locked away.
• If you have had a bad experience already with a crook - learn from it - don't just think bad luck won't strike twice!
if you want to learn more visit site
GhostPrint - Secure your Valuables
so I learned all this by buying a UV marker for my child
 
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