book: ONE SECOND AFTER

Discussion in 'Product Reviews' started by SurvivalNut, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. SurvivalNut

    SurvivalNut Retired Army

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    TITLE One Second After

    CATEGORY Fiction

    RATING (1-10) =7+
    ( I rate MALEVIL, ALAS BAYLON, WORLD MADE BY HAND and LIGHTS OUT as 10s') The Scientific basis for the plot rates a 10.

    OVERVIEW
    Modern day setting. A suspected EMP attack leaves a sleepy southern town in turmoil, grasping to survive on its own with little or no assistance from the outside world.

    SPOILERS RANTS & RAVES

    I found it hard to believe the protagonist, a retired Army Colonel (who authored a paper on EMP attacks) would struggle so hard to grasp an EMP attack has happened.

    There is a survival learning curve, those who recognize an event has happened (fire, plane crash, flood, earthquake, robbery, etc) and react rationally in accordance with those new facts of life are statistically more likely to survive. The main character in this book bases his day, or an event or a setback on the number of cigarettes he has remaining in his pocket. He is a hero who wanders lost through much of the "event" and at no time does he do anything to prepare for the survival of himself or his family. He allows the "state" to take care of him while he debates the changing of the little world about him. A luxury, in reality, that would not be available to the masses.

    The final survival statistics are shocking.

    The treatment and categorization of people who were already prepared is a warning.

    TALKING POINTS /LESSONS LEARNED

    1/ Everyone should have at least 30 days food, the means to purify water and the means to hunt and defend oneself.

    2/ Basic medical supplies and a long term prescription medical care plan (as feasible) is a necessity

    3/ Seeds for gardening are gold

    4/ An alternate safe location, under a day's walking distance is a good idea (i.e. your house burns to the ground or Cannibal Mutant Zombie Bikers invade)

    5/ Understand EMP and make a "Safe Box" containing some critical essential items (radios, 2 way commo, batteries, small solar panel etc)

    DISCLAIMER

    I am not an author, not as intelligent as most and read the book to improve my own preparation and knowledge. The book fairly improved my understanding of an EMP attack, but as an enjoyable read, it was long to point and slow to speed. I listened to the audio version, which I found somewhat annoying in dialect. The protagonist sounded like a hard *** the entire way through. Maybe flashbacks to my own Father. Didn't need that.
     
  2. Herbalpagan

    Herbalpagan Well-Known Member

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    I enjoyed the book as well. I found the most eye opening thing about the book was the (somewhat) predicatble timeline for things happening (one month some starvation, 2 weeks unhealthy heart people would die from over exertion, 3 months the prozac crowd would be nuts - times given are mine, but it's the idea I was going for)...The waves of disease, the hordes of migration, the cannibalism. The domino effect was amazing to see.

    I thought it could have been a bit faster paced as well. Over all a good book.:congrat:
     

  3. doc66

    doc66 Well-Known Member

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    I've been wanting to read this book, but not to buy it. It's been out of my local library every time I've looked. Hopefully its not as boring or longwinded as "Patriots", "Unintended Consequences" or "Enemies Foreign and Domestic".

    My favorite is still "Alas Babylon".

    Thanks for the mini review.
     
  4. Herbalpagan

    Herbalpagan Well-Known Member

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    It isn't as boring as Patriots. Although to be fair, my husband loved Patriots. If you want a great book to read while waiting for One Second After, try Lights Out by HalfFast. It's free and on line. Lights Out, Halffast
     
  5. doc66

    doc66 Well-Known Member

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    I have a copy of Lights Out and read it every now and then. Patriots couldn't decide if it wanted to be an owners manual, a bible or a story.
     
  6. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    I too bought it, I too was a bit disappointed with it, I mean the guy couldn't figure out how to keep clean, paint a barrel black add water and sun...come back in afternoon dip out warm if not hot water...add soap...scrub...crap... it did have some good points I just can't remember them..it was ok..
     
  7. SurvivalNut

    SurvivalNut Retired Army

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    I agree, I also remember (been a while since I listened to it) that the preppers or "those survivalist compound people" were looked at as squirrel hunting low lifes.


    The book took no appreciation of preps and still in the end the govt cavalry came riding in (late) to save everyone, delivering MRE's. And everyone lived happily ever after.

    MRE's Yum Yum. I'll roll over and do tricks for that. Yeah right........
     
  8. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    Well..... I really did like the Ham and Lima beans..AKA...Ham and MF'rs...but that was C rats...still have my first p-38..1959!!
     
  9. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    I thought it was pretty good overall. I usually read these types of books to look for holes in my preps. Despite the number of years I've been a survivalist I still have things to learn. They're kind of like eating fish. Just spit out the bones. They are good tests of our knowledge as well. Tips like painting a barrel black, etc. that we would have thought of that the author didn't. There's nothing wrong with taking the good and bad from a book and using it to evaluate our own preps.

    We bought the book and have loaned it out to others to read and perhaps open their eyes to some of the things that could be on the horizon. It does get them thinking!

    I too am tired of survivalists/preppers being treated poorly in so many books/TV shows/movies. You would think that anyone who made plans and preparations to keep ther family safe during hard times would be applauded. I think it's the welfare mentality that pervades our society (and the world) that those "with" should be responsible for those "without." Hogwash! I know too many people who could be preparing now but they're spending all of their money at Starbucks. When the hard times come and their family is in need it is not my responsibility to provide for them. (Even though they may think it is.)
     
  10. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    You beat me by 10 years, got my first and still going strong P-38 out of a C-ration in '69.:scratch
     
  11. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    Bob, would you believe that the c rats went back so far that the smokes were yellowed and when you tried to tamp them the tobacco flew out the end..the first one I got had Lucky Strikes in it..

    I won't even mention how many of the "Homies" tossed that little roll, not knowing it was their TP...hahahaha... gotta tell ya use "Squirrel shooters" were better prepared for it then them city boys...
     
  12. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    Good God are we dating ourselves or what.:eek:
     
  13. HozayBuck

    HozayBuck Well-Known Member

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    Bob, I'm so far over the hill the only date I can get is with myself....:D

    In fact I some times fear I'll never get a chance to use all this crap I have stored...is that lame or what?
     
  14. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    The wife and I just finished listening to 'One Second After', wow, how depressing. Didn't even one person have food storage, or prepared, didn't seem so. Following the time-line, 2 months into this disaster and they are already starving to death?, maybe I missed something. Good "get off your butt" and prepare book though, maybe this should be required reading for students.
     
  15. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    I read something the other day where someone quipped that the average American has more food stored for their dog than for their family.

    We have the book loaned out to our kids (it's getting passed around).
     
  16. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    I loved it!I bought it and "the road" the same day.it almost seemed to be a prequel to the road since the road never goes into what destroyed civilization.

    I recommend both and I don't just go buy books at full price.
     
  17. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    I gottcha both beat if a hand-me-down counts-- I have my dad's p38 from WWII, his dog tags and the army issue wooden handled pocket knife. He carried them all through Europe.
     
  18. horseman09

    horseman09 Well-Known Member

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    My wife and kids tell me I should have been a history teacher. Had I been a history teacher, One Second After would have been required reading, and you can bet the little darlings would not have gotten away with just Cliff Notes. I would have quizzed them chapter by chapter.:D
     
  19. SurvivalNut

    SurvivalNut Retired Army

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    I taught high school 95-99. Required reading in my class was "ANDERSONVILLE". Chapter by chapter we discussed the trials of 32,000 Union Civil War prisioners living in holes in the ground on 25 acres.

    I had visited the site in 1985. What a hell hole it would have been.

    I agree, One Second After would be an interesting study. I also have passed my audio book to all my family.
     
  20. emilysometimes

    emilysometimes Member

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    Anybody watching "The Walking Dead"? The one "prepper" on that show was one of the more hateful characters and came to a nasty end...